Coronavirus (Covid-19)Koh Samui

57 year old woman tests positive for Covid on Samui

A 57 year old Frenchwoman has baffled Thai medical officials with her quarantine-defying positive test for Covid-19.

The woman had been living on Koh Samui since returning from 14 days of quarantine. Whilst her positive status had become a hot topic on Samui over the past 24 hours, it took until this afternoon for Dr Sophon Iamsirithaworn, Director of the Bureau of General Communicable Diseases, to confirm the situation at a media conference in Bangkok.

The woman, together with her husband and child, originally tested negative, twice, during her 14 day mandatory stay at an Alternative State Quarantine facility in Samut Prakan, just south of Bangkok. After that the woman showed some symptoms and tested positive, 5 days later.

At this stage the woman’s husband and child have tested negative for Covid-19 following the confirmation of her infection. She is now being treated for her symptoms at the Koh Samui Hospital whilst her husband and child are being kept under observation.

Officials are now in the process to see if the patient could have contracted the disease AFTER her quarantine.

Her family have a home on Koh Samui. They arrived in Bangkok on a Thai Airways flight from Paris on September 30. They were quarantined in Samut Prakan for the mandatory 14 days before they could return to Samui on October 15. Then she developed a fever 2 days after arriving back on the island but stayed at home for a few days before going to a private hospital for another test last Tuesday. 2 days later the positive test was announced.

Now authorities are trying to figure out if the woman was infected whilst in Thailand.

Public health officials have tracked down and tested 15 people who they believe could be at “high-risk” of infection. They’ve all been isolated until their results are confirmed. Another 42 people are “under observation” and considered at “low risk”.

SOURCE: CSSA | Bannkok Post

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7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Baffled, how about a doctor taking money under the table for a negative report…? Nothing new there .

    A doctor in Scandinavia was last week caught giving a patient a Covid negative report, days before the actual test was done, which turned out to be Covid positive. In Scandinavia…

    1. Very unlikely, although it’s perfectly possible with a test under “normal” circumstances in any country, but it would be very difficult with tests done in quarantine as the swab is taken by one team, then given to a completely different team to test with the results being given directly to the government department. It would be possible if the swabbing team were bribed to take a swab from a different person, but that’s far from as simple as just bribing a doctor.

  2. The only thing baffling about this is why the “medical officials” are so “baffled” since it’s almost certainly a failure of the quarantine system, much as happened in New Zealand and in China when quarantine measures weren’t enforced strictly enough with identical results.

    In New Zealand, one very similar case happened when strict quarantine rules weren’t fully applied and those quarantined put their own refuse, such as empty drinking water bottles, in a refuse bin in the hotel corridor. The bin had a plastic lid, and the virus was transferred to the lid by someone touching it who had recently started quarantine so was contagious but had not yet tested positive as the virus was in the early stages of incubation. It was then transferred from the lid to another person touching it who was near the end of their quarantine period, so they didn’t test positive on their final test as the virus wasn’t yet developed.

    There was another similar case also in New Zealand, where someone at the beginning of their hotel quarantine who was contagious but with the virus not yet fully developed, so at the time they tested negative, pressed a lift button, contaminating it; the virus was then passed on to the next person using the lift who was a maintenance worker at the hotel (with a nearly identical case to that in China, with someone in self-quarantine).

    The more quarantine standards are reduced, either by time or by reducing the strict controls with, for example, a “7 + 7” system with loosened restrictions for the last seven days, obviously the more likely these cases are to occur. Guests are already allowed some access to hotel facilities, gardens, and communal areas which has to be a recipe for disaster and for easy transfer of the virus, so the only surprise is that this hasn’t happened more often – the Buriram United footballer, Akbar Ismatullaev, almost certainly contracted the virus in a similar way during his quarantine.

    The cheapest price for a 14 night hotel stay with full board appears to be as little as 29,000 baht; cutting costs to that level, and lower if some have their way, is a virtual guarantee that the quarantine will be ineffective as it would be simply impossible to control and supervise guests, supply staff with clean and effective PPE, and maintain the necessary hygiene standards for that sort of price.

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7 Comments

  1. Baffled, how about a doctor taking money under the table for a negative report…? Nothing new there .

    A doctor in Scandinavia was last week caught giving a patient a Covid negative report, days before the actual test was done, which turned out to be Covid positive. In Scandinavia…

    1. Very unlikely, although it’s perfectly possible with a test under “normal” circumstances in any country, but it would be very difficult with tests done in quarantine as the swab is taken by one team, then given to a completely different team to test with the results being given directly to the government department. It would be possible if the swabbing team were bribed to take a swab from a different person, but that’s far from as simple as just bribing a doctor.

  2. The only thing baffling about this is why the “medical officials” are so “baffled” since it’s almost certainly a failure of the quarantine system, much as happened in New Zealand and in China when quarantine measures weren’t enforced strictly enough with identical results.

    In New Zealand, one very similar case happened when strict quarantine rules weren’t fully applied and those quarantined put their own refuse, such as empty drinking water bottles, in a refuse bin in the hotel corridor. The bin had a plastic lid, and the virus was transferred to the lid by someone touching it who had recently started quarantine so was contagious but had not yet tested positive as the virus was in the early stages of incubation. It was then transferred from the lid to another person touching it who was near the end of their quarantine period, so they didn’t test positive on their final test as the virus wasn’t yet developed.

    There was another similar case also in New Zealand, where someone at the beginning of their hotel quarantine who was contagious but with the virus not yet fully developed, so at the time they tested negative, pressed a lift button, contaminating it; the virus was then passed on to the next person using the lift who was a maintenance worker at the hotel (with a nearly identical case to that in China, with someone in self-quarantine).

    The more quarantine standards are reduced, either by time or by reducing the strict controls with, for example, a “7 + 7” system with loosened restrictions for the last seven days, obviously the more likely these cases are to occur. Guests are already allowed some access to hotel facilities, gardens, and communal areas which has to be a recipe for disaster and for easy transfer of the virus, so the only surprise is that this hasn’t happened more often – the Buriram United footballer, Akbar Ismatullaev, almost certainly contracted the virus in a similar way during his quarantine.

    The cheapest price for a 14 night hotel stay with full board appears to be as little as 29,000 baht; cutting costs to that level, and lower if some have their way, is a virtual guarantee that the quarantine will be ineffective as it would be simply impossible to control and supervise guests, supply staff with clean and effective PPE, and maintain the necessary hygiene standards for that sort of price.

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