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Clinical trials confirm AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine is safe and effective

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Clinical trials confirm AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine is safe and effective | The Thaiger
Photo submitted by AstraZeneca

The following is a news release from biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. Thailand secured 61 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine produced by AstraZeneca, developed in partnership with Oxford University. With European Union’s newly-imposed restrictions on Covid-19 vaccine exports, AstraZeneca will now send a batch of 150,000 doses of its vaccine to Thailand from a factory in Asia, rather than from Italy like initially planned.

The primary analysis of the Phase III clinical trials from the UK, Brazil and South Africa, published as a preprint in The Lancet confirmed COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca is safe and effective at preventing COVID-19, with no severe cases and no hospitalisations, more than 22 days after the first dose.

Results demonstrated vaccine efficacy of 76% (CI: 59% to 86%) after the first dose, with protection maintained to the second dose. With an inter-dose interval of 12 weeks or more, vaccine efficacy increased to 82% (CI: 63%, 92%).

The analysis also showed the potential for the vaccine to reduce asymptomatic transmission of the virus, based on weekly swabs obtained from volunteers in the UK trial. The data showed that PCR positive readings were reduced by 67% (CI: 49%, 78%) after a single dose, and 50% (CI: 38% to 59%) after the two dose regimen, supporting a substantial impact on transmission of the virus.

The primary analysis for efficacy was based on 17,177 participants accruing 332 symptomatic cases from the Phase III UK (COV002), Brazil (COV003) and South Africa (COV005) trials led by Oxford University and AstraZeneca, a further 201 cases than previously reported.

Sir Mene Pangalos, Executive Vice President BioPharmaceuticals R&D, said: “This primary analysis reconfirms that our vaccine prevents severe disease and keeps people out of hospital. In addition, extending the dosing interval not only boosts the vaccine’s efficacy, but also enables more people to be vaccinated upfront. Together with the new findings on reduced transmission, we believe this vaccine will have a real impact on the pandemic.”

Professor Andrew Pollard, Chief Investigator of the Oxford Vaccine Trial, and co-author of the paper, said: “These new data provide an important verification of the interim data that has helped regulators such as the MHRA in the UK and elsewhere around the world to grant the vaccine emergency use authorisation. It also helps to support the policy recommendation made by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation for a 12-week prime-boost interval, as they look for the optimal approach to roll out, and reassures us that people are protected 22 days after a single dose of the vaccine.”

Data will continue to be analysed and shared with regulators around the world to support their ongoing rolling reviews for emergency supply or conditional approval during the health crisis. AstraZeneca is also seeking Emergency Use Listing from the World Health Organization for an accelerated pathway to vaccine availability in low-income countries.

The vaccine can be stored, transported and handled at normal refrigerated conditions (two-eight degrees Celsius/36-46 degrees Fahrenheit) for at least six months and administered within existing healthcare settings.

AstraZeneca continues to engage with governments, international organisations and collaborators around the world to ensure broad and equitable access to the vaccine at no profit for the duration of the pandemic.

COV002

COV002 is a single-blinded, multi-centre, randomised, controlled Phase II/III trial assessing the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of AZD1222 in 12,390 participants in the UK. Trial participants to date are aged 18 years or over, who are healthy or have medically stable chronic diseases and are at increased risk for being exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Participants receive one or two intramuscular doses of a half dose (~2.5 x1010 viral particles) or full dose (~5×1010 viral particles) of AZD1222 or comparator, meningococcal vaccine MenACWY. Participants have blood samples drawn and clinical assessments for safety as well as immunogenicity at multiple timepoints up to one year post-vaccination. Suspected cases presenting with compatible symptoms were tested for virological confirmation by COVID-19 PCR. In addition, weekly swabbing is done for detection of infection and assessment of vaccine efficacy against infection.

COV003

COV003 is a single-blinded, multi-centre, randomised, controlled Phase III trial assessing the safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of AZD1222 in 10,300 participants in Brazil. Trial participants to date are aged 18 years or over, who are healthy or have medically stable chronic diseases and are at increased risk for being exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Participants are randomised to receive two intramuscular doses of a full dose (~5×1010 viral particles) of AZD1222 or comparator, meningococcal vaccine MenACWY as first dose and a saline placebo as second dose. Participants have blood samples drawn and clinical assessments for safety as well as immunogenicity at multiple timepoints up to one year post-vaccination. Suspected cases presenting with compatible symptoms were tested for virological confirmation by COVID-19 PCR.

COV005

COV005 is a blinded, multi-centre, randomised, controlled Phase I/II trial assessing the safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of AZD1222 in 2,070 participants in South Africa. Trial participants are aged 18-65 years, who are living with or without HIV, are randomised to receive two intramuscular doses of AZD1222 at 5-7.5 x1010 viral particles or saline placebo. Participants had blood samples drawn and clinical assessments for safety as well as immunogenicity at multiple timepoints up to one year post-vaccination. Regular COVID-19 PCR testing is performed up to one year post-vaccination.

COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca, formerly AZD1222

COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca was co-invented by the University of Oxford and its spin-out company, Vaccitech. It uses a replication-deficient chimpanzee viral vector based on a weakened version of a common cold virus (adenovirus) that causes infections in chimpanzees and contains the genetic material of the SARS-CoV-2 virus spike protein. After vaccination, the surface spike protein is produced, priming the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus if it later infects the body.

In addition to the programme led by Oxford University, AstraZeneca is conducting a large trial in the US and globally. In total, Oxford University and AstraZeneca expect to enrol up to 60,000 participants globally.

The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine has already been granted conditional marketing authorisation or emergency use in close to 50 countries, spanning four continents including in the EU, a number of Latin American countries, India, Morocco and the UK.

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39 Comments

39 Comments

  1. Avatar

    brian mc

    Friday, February 5, 2021 at 3:15 pm

    some of those confidence intervals look pretty low. it seems conflicting to state something is safe and affective when the ci is in the 50% range. it seems more like saying it works and is safe, but only in about half of cases

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      Friday, February 5, 2021 at 6:38 pm

      No, that’s not what they’re saying which is that it works more effectively at stopping serious effects.

      Personally I’d be happy if there was only a 20 or 30% chance of it stopping the mild effects as long as there was a 100% cahnce of it stopping any serious effects.

      • Avatar

        brian mc

        Friday, February 5, 2021 at 8:44 pm

        you are correct. that is not what they are saying. but its what is reflected in the analysis figures.
        the text states the tests has confirmed COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca is safe and effective at preventing COVID-19, my point is the low ci value belittles that statement. if the ci were around 90% it would be be a reasonable statement, but CI: 38% to 59% is, as commented by yourself, lille more that possibly maybe or maybe not… 50:50.
        to state safe and effective based on those ci values is quite misleading imo

        • Avatar

          Issan John

          Friday, February 5, 2021 at 9:14 pm

          I suppose it all depends on what you consider safe and effective.

          What measure would you prefer?

          For me, I don’t really care if it’s less than 50% (or even 5%) effective at stopping all the symptoms of Covid-19 as long as it’s effective at stopping the worst effects.

          Others may be more fussy and want more.

          • Avatar

            Toby Andrews

            Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 11:50 am

            They Thais are already selling a Covid vaccine to ferangs foe B3000 – B2250 to Thais.
            if I had to pay B300o for a vaccine, I would demand it was a 100 percent effective, cured hepatitis, rabies, and any ingrown toenails.

  2. Avatar

    Issan John

    Friday, February 5, 2021 at 6:56 pm

    What I’d suggest is of most significance here as there’s been no evidence either way before but a lot of “probablies” is:

    “The analysis also showed the potential for the vaccine to reduce asymptomatic transmission of the virus, based on weekly swabs obtained from volunteers in the UK trial. The data showed that PCR positive readings were reduced by 67% (CI: 49%, 78%) after a single dose, and 50% (CI: 38% to 59%) after the two dose regimen, supporting a substantial impact on transmission of the virus.”

    SO EVEN AFTER TWO DOSES, THE CHANCES OF SOMEONE VACCINATED CARRYING AND PASSING ON THE VIRUS IS STILL 50:50.

    That should put an end, once and for all, to those saying that anyone vaccinated should be allowed in without quarantine.

    • Avatar

      MichaelBKK

      Friday, February 5, 2021 at 11:23 pm

      So not much difference to the data given against the influenza jab which actually comes out lower in protection , no vaccine will ever give anybody 100% protection against any virus so if that’s what your hoping I will say RIP little Johnny from issan now …….. I really don’t understand what you want to see or hear as you just seem to share pretty meaningless stats from various media outlets that before you quote these stats maybe look into the source and have a think . Don’t worry nobody is coming to visit your village so you are safe there and I doubt you have any plans to leave there anytime soon if ever ……

    • Avatar

      EdwardV

      Friday, February 5, 2021 at 11:48 pm

      Put an end those vaccinated wanting to arrive without a quarantine? Not to really argue with you John, but you don’t need to worry about foreigners being the impetus to ending the Thai quarantine system. You need to worry about the Thai government instead. It seems to me at least they are hell bent on dropping it once they get an acceptable level of the population vaccinated. When you have Phiphat Ratchakitprakam the chief of the Ministry of Tourism and Sports talking about getting 5M tourist in 2021, and you have the JSCCIB talking about prioritizing vaccinations to tourist workers. We are not even going to bring up all the talk out of those fools at TAT. The writing is on the wall. The only question will be what percentage of the population needs to be vaccinated, and how long will it take to get there.

      • Avatar

        Issan John

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 12:13 am

        ” Put an end those vaccinated wanting to arrive without a quarantine?”

        No, Ed V, I doubt anything will put an end to that since “I’m all right, Jack” seems to be the new normal.

        “The only question will be what percentage of the population needs to be vaccinated, and how long will it take to get there.”

        I agree with you 100% there.

        Those who’ve put a number on it have generally said 70%, which seems reasonable. How long’s a piece of string?

        • Avatar

          EdwardV

          Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 12:48 am

          Granted John, granted.

          How long, wow that’s a guess in anyone’s book. I’m thinking they are going to do everything they can to save the 2021 high season, even if it means playing at the margins and prioritizing. I think all the talk about the third quarter this year is absurd. Just not going to happen. 60/40 by Nov. 1st 2021, 95% by Chinese new year 2022 is my guess.

        • Avatar

          Eugene

          Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 2:04 am

          The day before, The Lancet published the results of the third phase of clinical trials of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine. From the publication it follows that the effectiveness of the drug against the disease was 91.6% after analyzing the data of 19,866 volunteers. The indicator among the group of volunteers over 60 years old was 91.8%. At the same time, as a result of the studies, no serious side effects of the vaccine administration were revealed, the humoral immune response was developed in more than 98% of the volunteers.

        • Avatar

          Fred glue

          Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 3:58 am

          The length of a piece string is twice the length from the centre too end……

    • Avatar

      London Al

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 12:48 am

      That’s not what it says, it’s your interpretation of what it says.

      At this moment I find myself at a crossroads, do I believe the chief medical officer of England, Professor Chris Whitty CB FRCP FFPH FMedSci, educated at Pembroke College, Oxford (BA in Physiology, DSc in medical science), Wolfson College Cambridge(BM BCh in Medicine), and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine(DTM&H in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, MSc in Epidemiology), who tells us the vaccine works and is completely safe, or do I listen to someone who has zero qualifications other than a doctorate in mongering, I’ll give it some thought.

      • Avatar

        Issan John

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 2:25 am

        No, London A1, the bit in quotes is “what it says”!

        That’s why it’s in quotes 🙂

      • Avatar

        Toby Andrews

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 12:00 pm

        Yes a difficult decision A!, er, well I’d believe Professor Whitty, although some of the mongers are quite knowledgeable when I listen to them after I’ve had a few drinks.

      • Avatar

        Issan John

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 6:07 pm

        Evidently not much in the way of “thoughts”, London A1, since I’ve never disagreed with anything he’s said – anything at all, including that he “tells us the vaccine works and is completely safe”.

    • Avatar

      brian mc

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 10:11 am

      realistically, its not even 50:50.
      “and 50% (CI: 38% to 59%) after the two dose regimen” suggests 50:50, but only up to 59% ci – in other words they are (statistically) between 38% and 59% sure it will be 50:50 effective in reducing asymptomatic transmission.

      would you bet the bank on a horse that had a 38% chance of completing 50% of the race?

      if they ran the analysis with a higher confidence level im sure the figures would not look too favourable.
      the 4 different ci values suggest to me they are cherry picking to show the best figures

      statistics are pants. air travel accidents reduced by 95% is little comfort if you find yourself on one of the 5% flights plummeting to the ground!

      • Avatar

        Issan John

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 1:52 pm

        Agreed 100%, brian mc.

        As I’m oft accused of being a doomster and gloomster I was trying to look on the bright side, but even then a 50:50 chance that those who’ve been vaccinated won’t be carrying the virus so they can all be excused quarantine has to be a bit short-sighted.

  3. Avatar

    Ben

    Friday, February 5, 2021 at 7:30 pm

    This virus is novel and generally kills the weak and the old. The vaccines vary in efficacy up to 95%. The virus is not going away. The quarantines around the world will not last forever. It’ll mutate and we’ll tweet the vaccine to deal with those mutations. We’ll get to a point of being able to manage the virus. That does not mean no one will get sick or die in the future. Some will choose not to vaccinate which is their right and will assume greater risk. If they’re young and healthy they’ll likely not be negatively affected.

    Once I get vaccinated my chance of becoming seriously ill and dying from the virus is greatly diminished. If I become ill we’ll have treatments that’ll increase my chances of survival. That’s the best I can hope for and that’s what I’ll live with. I’m not going to cower in fear or criticize the vaccine because it isn’t 100% effective. I’ll resume my life under a new normal routine and get the most out of it I can. I’m not going to let the fear mongers, on either side, control me. I’m going to be considerate of my fellow man in how I conduct myself.

    That’s my practical approach for better or for worse. Good luck to the world during this 2021 transition year. I’m optimistic.

    • Avatar

      David Mann

      Friday, February 5, 2021 at 8:14 pm

      Totally correct. 100% spot on analysis. Waiting until this disappears off the face of the earth will result in quarantine lasting for the next 50-100 years. The vaccines are what they are and will probably never get any more effective. They will tweak the formula as you say to fight off the new variants. So even in 2 years or 5 years, there is still a chance that anyone vaccinated will have a 25-50% chance of carrying the virus without symptoms and passing it on. It’s at that stage that countries like Thailand will look foolish (and financially broke) if they continue with quarantine. Right now quarantine is a good idea until such time as populations are vaccinated. Once they are, quarantine needs to end and proof of vaccination take over. No reason that by Q3 this year people from many countries who have had two jabs should be made to quarantine. It literally make no sense whatsoever.

      • Avatar

        Issan John

        Friday, February 5, 2021 at 9:23 pm

        What part of …

        “The analysis also showed the potential for the vaccine to reduce asymptomatic transmission of the virus, based on weekly swabs obtained from volunteers in the UK trial. The data showed that PCR positive readings were reduced by 67% (CI: 49%, 78%) after a single dose, and 50% (CI: 38% to 59%) after the two dose regimen, supporting a substantial impact on transmission of the virus”

        … do you not understand?

        Genuine question, as you don’t seem to understand what it means – that there’s still a 50:50 chance that anyone “from many countries who have had two jabs” is as likely to carry the virus and pass it on as anyone who’s had no jabs at all.

        • Avatar

          David Mann

          Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 1:13 am

          I understood it all IJ. You need to calm down and read what people say before jumping to your angry conclusions. I agree. Let me say it again in case you missed it. I agree! That’s what I said. I said it’s still going to result in a 25-50% chance that people will carry the virus and pass it on even after vaccination.
          My point is that situation will never end. It won’t end after people have been vaccinated, this year, next year or in the next 10 years. Are you actually proposing that Thailand should keep quarantine indefinitely? That’s what you appear to be saying?
          The fact is that with only a 50% chance, the R number worldwide will fall below 1.0 and so the number of cases will drop and be much more like seasonal flu. Once people have been vaccinated then they should be allowed to travel without quarantine. That’s where the world will end up anyway. The question is, which countries are smart enough to realise that and open to people who have been fully vaccinated.

          Now, if you still don’t understand, please do come back to me and I’ll try more simple English for you.

        • Avatar

          Ben

          Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 3:23 am

          I guess I don’t understand these numbers and where you got them from. One jab positives reduced by 67% and 2 jabs by 50%. A second jab increases your chance of transmission? Math doesn’t make sense to me.

          I thought the jury was out on this and they’re studying it. IJ, give the scientists a chance to figure this out. I’m assuming they will and hopefully the vaccinated will have a vastly diminished capability of transmitting the virus to others. Give the process a chance to play out and I’m optimistic it will be all right.

          • Avatar

            Issan John

            Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 2:05 pm

            I got them from the article, Ben, which got them from Astra Zeneca’s trials, published in the Lancet.

            That was what they were “studying”, with similar results in Israel from different vaccines.

            I think that means that “the scientists” have studied it, these are the results, and rather than “the vaccinated will have a vastly diminished capability of transmitting the virus to others” as was hoped, they’ve found that at best it’s reduced by 50%.

          • Avatar

            LX

            Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 8:10 pm

            I agree with Ben that it doesn’t make sense that a second dose would increase transmission. Maybe the way to interpret the data
            is the first dose reduces transmission by 67%, and the second dose reduces transmission by an ADDITIONAL 50%. That would mean the total reduction in transmission is 67% + (50% * 33%). That adds up to about 83% reduction in transmission. If the second dose is counter-productive, why would anybody ever recommend or get it? Again, it doesn’t make sense that the second dose would increase immunity and increase transmission.

  4. Avatar

    Patrick Kelly

    Friday, February 5, 2021 at 11:06 pm

    Yep …just what I thought. Lockdown proponents want to keep the quarantine indefinitely. Good luck with that as the economy circles the drain with every month that passes. Suvarnabhumi will be a ghost town for years at this rate. The fear & cowering crowd always live life with trepidation. What a sad way to exist.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 12:17 am

      It has nothing to do with “fear and cowering” – it’s consideration for others.

      Sadly but clearly an alien concept to many here.

      • Avatar

        Toby Andrews

        Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 3:01 pm

        Yes but sadly but clearly, I am an alien in the Far East. That is why I might have alien concepts . . .

  5. Avatar

    Ian

    Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 1:00 am

    Issan john just hates us he hates farangs he’s lost all morality of who he is why does he 3xist he’s scum and we all know it like a rat in the sour pity he doesn’t stay thier he has disowned his country he deserves nothing I so wish they decline his visa watch him come running back to uk tjecland of freedom and hope

    • Avatar

      To be more precise....

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 3:46 pm

      So called ‘Issan John’ is a very old north European lady, never married, no kids, never abroad in her life. However, lots of time and with cats around in a cold dark flat, so she can always write ‘opinions’ about every single item

  6. Avatar

    Eugene

    Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 2:37 pm

    The day before, The Lancet published the results of the third phase of clinical trials of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine. From the publication it follows that the effectiveness of the drug against the disease was 91.6% after analyzing the data of 19,866 volunteers. The indicator among the group of volunteers over 60 years old was 91.8%. At the same time, as a result of the studies, no serious side effects of the vaccine administration were revealed, the humoral immune response was developed in more than 98% of the volunteers.

  7. Avatar

    Patrick

    Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 2:47 pm

    The Russian one Sputnik seems to outdo all in clinical controlled trials while the West stays away from it. Politics and money as usual.

    • Avatar

      Eugene

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 3:19 pm

      you had time to reply before the censorship deleted my message :))
      strange why Thiger is deleting information about this vaccine.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 4:31 pm

      Agreed 100%, for a change, Patrick.

      Germany’s having problems so that could be enough to change things in the EU.

  8. Avatar

    Ben

    Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 9:44 pm

    The world has shut down for a year now and many have died. Many more would have died had the shut downs not occurred.

    Countries are now looking to vaccines to protect their populations and as THE way to open back up to tourism. If the vaccines limit infectiousness then those vaccinated will be allowed to enter without quarantine immediately. Otherwise, when enough of the population is vaccinated they’ll open up to the vaccinated. This is a practical approach that’ll be accepted by the Thai population and ultimately the world. We now have a path and we’re on it whether we all agree or not.

    I’ve found whenever I have a problem to solve that doesn’t seem to have an easy answer, if I have some patience and give it some time, an answer usually emerges that wasn’t initially available. Maybe it’s ingenuity or luck or just looking at the problem a different way.

    • Avatar

      Gobsmacked_1

      Sunday, February 7, 2021 at 12:17 am

      Hi Guys, do you want to know my comment, as a professional scientist/engineer/inventor (BSc, MSc and PhD, at three different Russell Group universities) for over 40 years?

      My comment is that NONE of you guys understand how to interpret statistical data. You don’t know the definition of the statistical terms, or the equations relating the terms. You are not even on first base. I doubt if any of you have an “A” level in maths, let alone a degree in ANY science subject, including the social sciences. If you have never heard the terms “Normal Distribution, Binomial Distribution, Poission Distribution…….” then you shouldn’t be attempting to interpret the data and deducing probabilities of catching COVID-19 in different age ranges etc etc.

      You are not alone. UK governments in particular for years have had very few scientists. I was never a fan of Maggie Thatcher, but funnily enough she had an MSc in Chemistry. Her supervisor was not very impressed with her, and she then went on to become a lawyer, and then a successful politician! Come to think of it, Angela Merkel has a doctorate (PhD) in Quantum Chemistry – she is one very bright cookie!

      Ok, you have my honest opinion and you can take it or leave it. As they say in Thailand, “it’s up to you”!! Cheers, stay safe, and have a good day!

      • Avatar

        Baroness

        Sunday, February 7, 2021 at 2:17 am

        Did you mean “Poisson Distribution”?

        • Avatar

          Gobsmacked_1

          Sunday, February 7, 2021 at 4:14 pm

          Yes, well spotted, Baroness A spelling error on my part.

  9. Avatar

    Issan John

    Sunday, February 7, 2021 at 6:47 pm

    Since you ask, no, and since it’s not possible to establish distributions and probabilities from the data given here, your time at three different Russell Group universities was clearly wasted.

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Thailand News Today | Covid testing for visas, Business impact, Vaccine approval | January 19 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 month ago

Thailand News Today | Covid testing for visas, Business impact, Vaccine approval | January 19

Thailand News Today | Weekend Bangkok bombs, Thailand fires, Covid update | January 18 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 month ago

Thailand News Today | Weekend Bangkok bombs, Thailand fires, Covid update | January 18

Thailand News Today | Stray car on runway, Indonesian quake, 300 baht tourist fee | January 15 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Stray car on runway, Indonesian quake, 300 baht tourist fee | January 15

Thailand News Today | Governor off respirator, sex-trafficking arrest, condo prices falling | January 14 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Governor off respirator, sex-trafficking arrest, condo prices falling | January 14

Thailand News Today | Chinese vaccine, Thailand ‘drug hub’, Covid update | January 13 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Chinese vaccine, Thailand ‘drug hub’, Covid update | January 13

Thailand News Today | Bangkok may ease restrictions, Phuket bar curfew, Vaccine roll out | January 12 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Bangkok may ease restrictions, Phuket bar curfew, Vaccine roll out | January 12

Thailand News Today | Covid latest, Cockfights closed down, Bryde’s Whale beached | January 11 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Covid latest, Cockfights closed down, Bryde’s Whale beached | January 11

Thailand News Today | Southern floods, Face mask fines, Thai Air Asia woes | January 8 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | Southern floods, Face mask fines, Thai Air Asia woes | January 8

Thailand News Today | 305 infections, No happy ending for massages, Phuket quarantine mooted | Jan 7 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | 305 infections, No happy ending for massages, Phuket quarantine mooted | Jan 7

Thailand News Today | 10,000 schools closed, 900 new migrant infections, Gambling crackdown | January 6 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 months ago

Thailand News Today | 10,000 schools closed, 900 new migrant infections, Gambling crackdown | January 6

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