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Former Thai PM Yingluck reminds Prayut of protests calling for her resignation

Maya Taylor

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Former Thai PM Yingluck reminds Prayut of protests calling for her resignation | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Moritz Hager / Flickr
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Former PM Yingluck Shinawatra has taken to social media to remind the current Thai leader of the situation she found herself in 6 years ago, when she faced mounting calls for her resignation from Prayut Chan-o-cha and the People’s Democratic Reform Committee. The PDRC were instrumental in organising anti-government protests between 2013 and 2014, which culminated in a military coup led by the current PM. Yingluck, who, along with her brother, former PM Thaksin, lives in exile, has taken to Facebook to remind Prayut how she dissolved parliament to allow for fresh elections.

“I do not know if everyone still remembers? 6 years ago, a group of people called themselves the People’s Democratic Reform Committee and demanded my resignation. And the Army chief, Prayut Chan-o-cha, asked if I could continue leading the government. In the end, I decided to announce the dissolution of parliament to pave the way for new elections so that the people could determine the future of the country for themselves in keeping with democratic principles.”

Anti-government protests began in late 2013, when Yingluck’s Pheu Thai Party proposed an amnesty bill that was seen as paving the way for the return of her brother, who is living in exile due to corruption charges against him. The proposal led to widespread political protests, culminating in Yingluck’s removal from office in May 2014. The Royal Thai Army then declared martial law throughout the Kingdom, after which a military coup deposed Yingluck’s administration and installed army general Prayut as acting PM.

In her Facebook post, Yingluck addresses Prayut directly, pointing out that he should listen to those calling for his resignation and take action to allow the country to move on.

“Today, the same event has happened to Prayut. Students, brothers and sisters want to see the country change, and they are asking Prayut to resign and amend the constitution. I have been monitoring the situation in Thailand with concern.”

“It reminded me of a time when you asked me 6 years ago if I was okay. And I hope you remember that today and choose to make a decision quickly so that the country can calm down and move on.”

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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18 Comments

18 Comments

  1. Avatar

    patty

    October 19, 2020 at 10:56 am

    What goes around comes around

  2. Avatar

    mike

    October 19, 2020 at 11:00 am

    There are some major differences that Yingluck should point out – she was democratically elected – Prayut was not and never has been. The current protests are organic. The protests that inspired her to dissolve parliament were organised by corrupt elitists who eventually staged an illegal military coup.

    The Yingluck government was legitimate. Prayut’s is not.

    • Avatar

      preesy chepuce

      October 24, 2020 at 10:27 am

      The leader of Belarus was “democratically elected” with 80% of the vote, his government must be legitimate too, I guess…

  3. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    October 19, 2020 at 11:19 am

    Her advice is good. Prayut should go in order to start the process to allow the country to move on.

  4. Avatar

    James Scott

    October 19, 2020 at 12:52 pm

    I have said from day one Thaksin and Yingluck will be the ones that will eventually win out of this. For all their faults, both were democratically elected and both instituted programs that helped the poor. They also both understood how to run a country and how to deal with international interests unlike the idiot in power at the moment.

    Eventually, they will end up back in Thailand and one, or both, will end up back in government.

    Meanwhile Prayut — an illegal prime minister put into ‘power’ by an illegal coup and then reinstated by a rigged election — needs to go.

    The man is scum, and the faster he is kicked out of government the better for everyone in Thailand.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 19, 2020 at 4:04 pm

      I think Thaksin is very much seen as being “of his day”, and while Thailand’s first (and only) populist PM his time has past and the future probably lies with the younger generation and the likes of Thanathorn (Future Forward) rather than any politicians from the past.

    • Avatar

      preesy chepuce

      October 24, 2020 at 10:28 am

      You’re absolutely dreaming. The president of Belarus has got more chance of winning out of this.

  5. Avatar

    Agatha Beans

    October 19, 2020 at 2:03 pm

    Convicted criminal, like her brother, isn’t she?

    • Avatar

      "Convicted" by?

      October 19, 2020 at 3:21 pm

      Of course, rule of law is a basic constitutional principle and a guiding star for a current military junta. Part of which is independent judiciary, which stands ready to convict any opposition to government

    • Avatar

      Douglas Higgins

      October 20, 2020 at 8:06 am

      You say both her and her brother are convicted criminals by who. What you are forgetting is they were elected to that position to leed the country. There was those in the country who did not agree with what they were doing as supporting the farmers and poor people to free education for their children and health care. In response to this the army stage a coup and took control of the country and it was they who judged those two as criminals. Would you call that honest justice.

      • Avatar

        preesy chepuce

        October 24, 2020 at 10:24 am

        Whilst terms like “criminal” are a bit extreme. It’s amazing how quickly people go on about “democracy” and edit out any questions of how free and fair those elections were, with thugs in pickup trucks, extra-judicial killings, and big money “influence” scattering amongst the poor to “help them vote” the right way. I wouldn’t have thought many people use words like “honest” and “justice”. There are major changes needed to transform a developing country into a developed one, and no voices from the past seem likely to make those changes.

  6. Avatar

    TS

    October 19, 2020 at 3:14 pm

    Your illegal military takeover has never been recognised by most countries anyway mr dictator and Yingluck is right- There wont be the restored peace & order you say you want until you and your cronies leave the building. Free and transparent elections are what the demonstrators want; not more talk about new resolutions, conditions blah, blah. Quit stalling for time and beat it down the line.
    Thai people are smart and creative and they’re rightly sick and tired of your boots on their necks.

  7. Avatar

    Pam

    October 20, 2020 at 7:45 am

    None of your business anymore EX!

  8. Avatar

    Douglas Higgins

    October 20, 2020 at 7:51 am

    What those in control of Thailand are forgetting is that ecconomically they are crippling the country driving it further into poverty. What country will trade with them with the constant threat of unrest in that country. A number of foreign companies have moved their factories to Vietnam throwing more out of work. In the recent election votes from New Zealand were some how delayed which disqualified them from being counted leading to claims of corruption. It seems these protest will not go away until an honest general election is held. The detaining of protesters or the killing of them will only harm Thailand. Speaking to Thais on Sunday in my country they are sad to see this happening to their country and hope the government listens and holds an honest election.

  9. Avatar

    Political Observer

    October 20, 2020 at 5:43 pm

    Hopefully General Prayut will be in exile soon. Charged with conspiracy to overthrow democratically elected governments.

  10. Avatar

    Fred glue

    October 21, 2020 at 9:29 am

    General Prayut is not in charge, some one else is, Thai students know who it is. That’s why they are upset.
    School kids can run & operate any country, all old fokes saying do this do that. Look at the yanks with there
    candidates, between the two It adds up too , 150- years, 75- each. For president..
    Someone got too help these kids in Thailand. Who I don’t know, but I wish them all the best.

  11. Avatar

    John Brig

    October 21, 2020 at 12:10 pm

    555

  12. Avatar

    Don R

    October 21, 2020 at 1:54 pm

    “Democrat is two wolves and a sheep arguing over what to have for dinner.”

    Even if they were democratically elected, I fear Thaksin and Yingluck more than the junta govt. Their Duterte-style extrajudicial killings disguised as a war on drugs speak to their true nature as politicians.

    In contrast, under the junta govt, Thailand is moving quickly towards legalization of marijuana. This is the kind of major change the country needs. Let poor farmers grow something that actually makes money! Let poor street venders hawk something that actually sells!

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Protests

PM refuses to resign, citing concerns over political divide, the economy, Covid-19

Maya Taylor

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PM refuses to resign, citing concerns over political divide, the economy, Covid-19 | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Thai PBS World

“I refuse to comply with the proposals that do not represent the needs of the majority of the people.”

The Thai PM has made it clear he will not resign, saying he has no intention of “abandoning the country during a crisis”. Addressing Parliament yesterday, Prayut Chan-o-cha pointed to the current problems facing Thailand, including the political divide in society, the crisis brought on by the slowdown of the economy, and the dangers of a Covid-19 resurgence. He was responding to opposition calls for his resignation.

“You should think back to the political rallies in 2006 and 2014, when the ones in power also did not resign. I refuse to comply with the proposals that do not represent the needs of the majority of the people and will not run away from problems or abandon the country during a crisis. Ask yourself whether the victory you will gain on top of the country’s wreckage will be worth it or not, because by then we will have nothing left to change. Think about the children. Don’t use them to drive political movements.”

The PM went on to thank MPs who’d offered suggestions for a way out of the ongoing crisis, but pointed out that one of his biggest concerns about the protests is the risk of a resurgence of the Covid-19 virus. He says the country must do everything to avoid another lockdown, adding that the protests risk undermining economic confidence and are creating division in Thai society.

“The political rallies could undermine the confidence in our economy, but what worries me is that it could cause a rift in Thai society. We used to say that Thais treat each other as family members and respect one another. I don’t want to see this culture disappear because of misunderstanding between generations.”

Referring to yesterday’s incident in Parliament, in which opposition MP Visan Techatirawat cut his arm in protest at the treatment of anti-government activists, the PM claims the incident was pre-meditated in order to get media attention.

“However, I regret that it happened, as such an incident has never taken place in Parliament before.”

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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Protests

Opposition MP slashes his arm in protest at treatment of anti-government activists

Maya Taylor

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Opposition MP slashes his arm in protest at treatment of anti-government activists | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Naew Na

An opposition party MP has slashed his arm in front of officials in Parliament, in protest at the treatment of political activists. Visan Techatirawat, a partY member of the opposition Pheu Thai Party, says the gesture was his own personal protest to oppose the government’s action against peaceful protesters at a rally in the capital on October 17. Police remain accused of using high-powered water cannons laced with chemicals to disperse the gathering, although police chiefs have denied using any chemicals.

Visan slashed his left hand and arm 3 times on the second day of a parliamentary debate aimed at finding a way out of the current political impasse. He says that, while he’s been in politics since 1986, he still doesn’t know how to solve the political problems facing the country and would rather shed his own blood than have the young protesters have to shed theirs.

Opposition MP slashes his arm in protest at treatment of anti-government activists | News by The Thaiger

PHOTO: Nation Thailand

It’s understood the opposition politician used a fruit knife he’d borrowed from a maid in the parliament building. He says he did not announce his plans to anyone, including his family, before carrying out the act.

Nation Thailand reports that officials and others who witnessed the act were left shocked, with Parliament President, Chuan Leekpai, calling on first-aiders to help. Visan was subsequently taken to hospital and later apologised for the shock he caused. He says the Thai PM Prayut Chan-o-cha must listen to the protesters, rather than resorting to the use of force and standing behind the fence of legal barriers put in place by the unelected NCPO.

Since mid-July, anti-government protesters, primarily students and the younger population, have been taking to the streets with a list of demands. They include the PM’s resignation, the dissolution of parliament, and fresh elections. They are also calling for a re-write of the 2017 constitution and for reform of the monarchy.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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Bangkok

Royalists crowd Bangkok’s Lumpini Park to support Thai Monarchy

Caitlin Ashworth

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Royalists crowd Bangkok’s Lumpini Park to support Thai Monarchy | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Post Today

Bangkok’s Lumpini Park was crowded with royalists yesterday afternoon after gathering to show their support and respect for the institution of the Thai Monarchy. The gathering is in response to a series of pro-democracy protests over the past 2 weeks, specifically, and the the last 3 months more generally, calling on government reform and questioning the role of His Majesty the King’s political activities during his time in Germany.

Royalists massed to show their respect for the Thai Monarchy, all dressed in yellow, the colour that symbolises the royal institution. Some held photos of the royal family including Rama IX and Rama X. They shouted “We love the King. Long Live the King.”

The royalists also called on pro-democracy protesters to stop making remarks, they say, are offensive to the Thai Monarchy. Last month, pro-government leader Tul Sithisomwang filed police complaints against 3 pro-reform leaders for allegedly violating Thailand’s lèse majesté law, which prohibits insults or comments that defame the Thai Monarchy.

A smaller group of royalists gathered in the morning outside the United States Embassy in Bangkok and called on the American government to end a so-called hybrid war, accusing them of “interfering” with Thai politics and internal affairs.

The royalists also plan to rally outside the French Embassy and the Japanese Embassy, countries they say are also subverting the Thai Monarchy, without any specific evidence.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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