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Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west

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Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west | The Thaiger

The south of Thailand awakes this morning to a wet and windy aftermath of tropical storm Pabuk. The storm centre has crossed the Peninsula and now sits west of Phang Nga province as it weakens and continues to move westerly away from the coast.

Gale-force winds, storm surges and flash flooding are still predicted as the remnants of the weakening storm cross the Malay Peninsula.

Koh Samui, Koh Tao, Koh Phangan and the coastlines of Nakhon Si Thammarat, Surat Thani and Chumpon are still threatened by waves up to three metres high, strong winds and storm surges.

Mountainous inland areas of Nakhon Si Thammarat, Surat Thani, Phang Nga, Trang and Krabi remain at risk of flash floods and landslides.

Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west | News by The Thaiger

The Meteorological Department says the storm made landfall in Nakhon Si Thammarat’s Pak Phanang district at 4pm Friday, packing winds at speeds of up to 75 kilometres per hour. Tropical storms like Pabuk are extremely rare for this time of the year in Thailand’s south.

Warnings remain of heavy downpours and strong winds on Saturday for Phetchaburi, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Chumphon, Surat Thani, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Phatthalung, Ranong, Phang Nga, Phuket, Krabi, Trang and Satun.

Thon Thamrongnawasawat of Kasetsart University’s Faculty of Fisheries says that, even though the Gulf is calming now that Pabuk has moved on, strong winds and high waves continue to batter the eastern coasts of Koh Samui, Koh Tao and Koh Pha-ngan in Surat Thani and the coast of Nakhon Si Thammarat.

Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west | News by The Thaiger Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west | News by The Thaiger

Anond Snidvongs, director of Geo Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency, said it detected six metre high waves off the eastern coast of Koh Samui late Friday afternoon.

“Due to its slow movement of the storm, rain will continue over large parts of the South, so people should be aware of forest runoffs and flash floods.”

As Pabuk move west into the Andaman today, Thon predicts rough conditions, but he said the waves would not be as high as they were in the Gulf during the storm. Nevertheless, he advises fishermen and tourists to avoid going out to sea because it was still too dangerous.

Pattani on the southern border suffered less than expected, though there was at least one casualty after a fishing vessel sank in rough seas.

Pabuk: Now sits over Andaman Sea, moving west | News by The Thaiger



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Krabi

Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi

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Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | The Thaiger

A 20 kilogram, 5 metre king cobra has been caught by a skilled rescue worker with his bare hands in Krabi.

Ao Nang rescue workers were notified that a king cobra was hiding near a local house in Krabi City. It took about 10 minutes for rescue workers to find the king cobra.

37 year old Sutee Naewhart, who found the cobra used his bare hand to pull the king cobra out of its hiding place by its tail.

At first it shook off his captor and tried to get away but Khun Sutee took a second go and within 20 minutes had the cobra in hand – his bare hands.

Khun Sutee says, “It not difficult to catch a snake with bare hands but we need to think about safety first. I caught this snake with my bare hands as I don’t want to hurt it with a snake snare. I have had lots of practice to catch snakes. With no experience you can die by snake bite.”

A 20 kilogram, 6 metre king cobra was caught in Trang by rescue workers the day before.

Watch that video HERE.

Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | News by The Thaiger Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | News by The Thaiger Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | News by The Thaiger Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | News by The Thaiger Five metre king cobra caught with bare hands in Krabi | News by The Thaiger

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Krabi

Eight days in southern Thailand

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Eight days in southern Thailand | The Thaiger

mtv.co.uk have visited Thailand recently and come up with their own short, cool, stays in the southern region. If you have a spare eight days, here is their guide for a quick southern beach holiday.

Phuket: 2 nights

How to get there

It’s time to switch it up and head to the Southern region of Thailand. The easiest way is to fly direct to Phuket, an hour from Bangkok, to hours from Chiang Mai, an hour from Kuala Lumpur and 90 minutes from Singapore. Book in advance with any of the many budget airlines that have direct local flights into Phuket – Air Asia, Nok Airways, Jetstar, Lion Air, Bangkok Air, Thai Smile. Many airlines fly direct to Phuket from overseas airports. There is also daily bus services travelling to the island and a train from Bangkok, but you’ll need to get off at Surat Thani and take a three hour bus to Phuket.

What to do

Phuket is often seen simply as a gateway to the islands in the Andaman – but with over 30 beaches of its own, it’s a great destination in its own right too. Visit Patong and Patong Beach for a raucous night out on Bangla Road (think neon lights, rowdy bars, and crowded streets: see The Hangover 2 for reference).

For those who prefer a quieter holiday, Phuket old town has many excellent restaurants, quirky shops, cafés and art shops with lots of local history, while a day trip to the Similan Islands is an absolute MUST – you’ll feel like you’ve walked into a legit screensaver. Phang Nga Bay and the floating Muslim village of Koh Panyee are also highlights of the region. On the island there are temples, Big Buddha, international stage shows, ladyboy shows (family friendly) and lots of markets and shopping opportunities.

Eight days in southern Thailand | News by The Thaiger

Koh Phi Phi: 3-4 nights

How to get there

A 90-minute ferry or 45-minute speedboat ride is all takes to get from Phuket to Koh Phi Phi, which is actually two islands: the larger Phi Phi Don is all about beach bars (featuring fire throwing shows), busy township with touristy shops and hedonistic vibes. In contrast the smaller Phi-Phi Leh is undeveloped, with coral reefs, towering cliffs, and lush greenery. It’s hotel-free too – and can only be visited for the day. Remember, for now, Maya Bay remains closed to tourists and can only be viewed in a drive-by with local tour boats.

What to do

Get. Beachy. Phi-Phi’s gorgeous white sands, vivid turquoise water and awesome rock formations make for a tropical paradise – perfect for lazy days sunbathing, snorkelling, and generally riding that relaxi-taxi all the way to stress-free town.

Eight days in southern Thailand | News by The Thaiger

Krabi: 1 night

How to get there

Another short ferry ride (between 1-3 hours) will take you back to the mainland, and deposit you in the hectic heart of Krabi, backpacker central. Ao Nang, the main beach town in the area, is renowned for bar crawls, clubs, and that fresher’s week feel, so stay for one night of fun and then move on, heading across to the East Coast.

What to do

Party, honey. Alternatively, take it easy and enjoy a dip in the shockingly clear waters of Thung Teo Forest National Park’s Emerald Pool, after working up a sweat exploring forest trails and waterfalls. Oh, and while you’re on the ‘natural pool’ flex, the mineral-infused Klong Thom Hot Springs are an hour’s drive from central Krabi. If climbing 1237 steps to Buddhist nirvanas your thing, then a visit to Wat Tham Suea or Tiger Cave Temple will provide you with a lot of exercise (take GOOD walking shoes) and an astonishing view when you reach the top.

Eight days in southern Thailand | News by The Thaiger

Koh Lanta: 2 nights

How to get there

Ferries between Koh Phi Phi and Koh Lanta take 1 hour, and cost 400 baht, approx.

What to do

After some potentially wild nights on Phi Phi, Koh Lanta will feel like a haven, with its long, quiet beaches, relaxing reggae bars (grab a bean bag chair for a front seat to spectacular sunsets), and almost empty roads – perfect for exploring by scooter. Head to Koh Lanta’s National Park (there’s a small entry fee, but it’s worth it) to hike trails, do some monkey spotting, and visit two idyllic beaches.

Eight days in southern Thailand | News by The Thaiger

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Himalayan griffon vulture found in a Krabi rubber plantation after storm

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Himalayan griffon vulture found in a Krabi rubber plantation after storm | The Thaiger

PHOTOS: DNP

A large but weak Himalayan griffon vulture has been found in a Krabi rubber plantation after poor weather on Monday. It’s believed to have come from Tibet.

The head of Phang Nga Breeding Centre, Teetat Damudom says, “The Himalayan griffon vulture was brought to us on Monday. The vulture was been found by locals at a rubber plantation in Khao Phanom, Krabi.”

“The vulture – measured wingtip to wingtip – is about two metres wide. It is weak from a lack of food and water.”

“We believed that the vulture might have been trying to avoid tropical storm ‘Pabuk’ and was lost. It might have originally flown from Tibet.”

Himalayan griffon vulture found in a Krabi rubber plantation after storm | News by The Thaiger Himalayan griffon vulture found in a Krabi rubber plantation after storm | News by The Thaiger Himalayan griffon vulture found in a Krabi rubber plantation after storm | News by The Thaiger

 

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