Connect with us

Southeast Asia

With a ‘whoosh’ his village was gone – Tsunami Update

The Thaiger

Published 

 on 

With a ‘whoosh’ his village was gone – Tsunami Update | The Thaiger
  • follow us in feedly

Asep Sunaria says he heard a loud “whoosh” just moments before a wall of water pushed him off his motorbike. The surging waters swallowed up his house and the village he called home until the Saturday night calamity.

new.yahoo.com reports that rescuers hunted for survivors of the volcano-triggered tsunami that killed at least 281 people along Indonesia’s coast. At the same time, 42-year-old Sunaria was trying to come to grips with a disaster that struck without warning.

“The water came from over there with a sound like the wind — ‘whoosh’,” he recounted to AFP.

“I was shocked. I didn’t expect it at all — there was no warning … At first I thought it was just a tidal wave but the water rose so high.”

He and his family sprinted from Sukarame village to higher ground, leaving them with only the clothes on their back.

Some villagers perished when the powerful tsunami struck on Saturday night, sweeping over popular beaches of southern Sumatra and the western tip of Java and inundating tourist hotels and coastal settlements.

Meanwhile, the spokesman for the National Disaster Management Agency, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, told a news conference that another tsunami is a possibility because of the continued volcanic eruptions of Anak Krakatau.

Read the rest of the article HERE.

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.



Find more SE Asian News courtesy of The Thaiger.

Broke? Find employment in Southeast Asia with JobCute Thailand. Rich? Invest in real estate across Asia with FazWaz Property Group. Even book medical procedures worldwide with MyMediTravel, all powered by DB Ventures.

If you have story ideas, a restaurant to review, an event to cover or an issue to discuss, contact The Thaiger editorial staff.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Crime

Thai Doctor faces charges in “wombs-for-hire” scandal

Jack Burton

Published

on

Thai Doctor faces charges in “wombs-for-hire” scandal | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Chiang Rai Times

A Thai doctor faces charges of human trafficking and involvement in a Chinese-funded cross-border surrogacy service, using Thai women to carry babies for Chinese couples. Police say that the doctor, whose name is being withheld, previously worked at a state hospital in the Victory Monument area of Bangkok and allegedly provided “assisted-reproductive services” to surrogate Thai mothers, usually at clinics in Laos. The surrogate mothers then returned to Thailand until their third trimester, when they were sent to China to deliver the children.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the closure of all borders, the surrogate mothers are now reportedly having to give birth in Thailand, instead of in China.

4 other doctors at state hospitals will also be invited to provide information to anti-human trafficking police about the racket. A woman, suspected of being a broker who allegedly handles financial transactions for the racket, was arrested in Bangkok on Monday. She was later released on 200,000 baht bail.

In February, police raided a house in Bangkok’s Lat Phrao area and found seven Thai women, all of them pregnant, and a 20 day old baby under the care of a woman, who claimed to have been paid 14,000 baht to look after the babies in the house.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Continue Reading

Thai Life

Burma or Myanmar? Myanmarese or Burmese?

The Thaiger

Published

on

Burma or Myanmar? Myanmarese or Burmese? | The Thaiger

We refer to Myanmar a lot in our news because it’s a bordering foreign country to Thailand and many people from Myanmar work in and around Thailand.

But is it Myanmar or Burma, and are the people that live there Myanmarese or Burmese?

As you’ll read across the media there is no precise answer to the question with foreign powers still referring to the country with its two names although, officially, since 1989, the ruling party changed the country’s name to Myanmar. But even in Myanmar locals continue to use both names.

“The ruling military junta changed its name from Burma to Myanmar in 1989, a year after thousands were killed in the suppression of a popular uprising. Rangoon also became Yangon.”

At The Thaiger we’ve decided to refer to the country as ‘Myanmar’ and the people as ‘Burmese’. Reading ‘a man from Myanmar’ is a lot more cumbersome than ‘a Burmese man’. But for the country we’re following the trend of most regional media using the official name Myanmar. Even the people living there continue to refer to themselves as Burmese.

Other publications have taken different decisions and that’s fine too. Here’s some information from The Culture Trip which provides a bit of background as to why our neighbouring country to the west lives on with two names and plenty of confusion.

Inside Asia Tours also has their own take on the name situation.

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Continue Reading

Thailand

Central Thailand prepares for return of thousands of Burmese workers

Maya Taylor

Published

on

Central Thailand prepares for return of thousands of Burmese workers | The Thaiger
PHOTO: AFP/The Asean Post

The central province of Samut Sakhon is preparing for the return of over 5,000 migrant labourers from Myanmar over the next month. The workers had returned to their home country to obtain the required paperwork and officials now say their employers must take responsibility for their quarantine.

Employers are being asked to arrange accommodation to house the workers for the 14 day mandatory quarantine period, with Samut Sakhon governor Veerasak Vijitsaengsri expressing his confidence that the actions of employers and officials will mean there will be no further spreading of the Covid-19 virus among the migrant community.

Officials will no doubt be looking at the recent experience in Singapore, where the virus was thought to be under control until an outbreak in more than 20,000 of its migrant workers caused an unexpected “second wave”, with the city state regularly reporting over 1,000 new cases a day at one point. The country now has over 32,000 cases after having a total of exactly 1,000 cases on April 1.

Nation Thailand reports that around 600 companies based in Samut Sakhon will re-hire 5,400 workers from Myanmar after both the Thai and Myanmar governments signed a memorandum of understanding. These companies are now responsible for ensuring their employees fulfill the mandatory quarantine requirements.

Officials state that each worker should be provided with a room and private bathroom if possible, but where two workers must share a room, there must be at least one metre distance between the beds. Regular temperature checks are mandatory, as is the provision of hand sanitiser and face masks for all workers.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Continue Reading

Trending