Coronavirus (Covid-19)Thailand

9 new Covid-19 cases detected in quarantine, all asymptomatic

PHOTO: Travel Daily Media

9 new Covid-19 cases were detected in quarantine in the past 24 hours. All were reported as asymptomatic and from those travelling back from India, Japan, South Sudan and the United Arab Emirates, according to the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration. Thailand now reports a total of 3,652 confirmed Covid-19 cases with 59 deaths. 3,457 people have recovered and 136 people are being treated in hospitals. Here’s some more details about the cases announced today…

  • 3 army engineers from South Sudan, ages 27, 35 and 36, tested positive for Covid-19. They arrived on Monday and were quarantined in Chon Buri when they tested positive for the virus. They were admitted to the Phramongkutklao Hospital in Bangkok.
  • 3 people travelling from the United Arab Emirates tested positive for Covid-19. 2 were Thai women, a 26 year old flight attendant and a 39 year old masseuse, who returned to Thailand last Friday and tested positive for the virus 3 days after their arrival. They were quarantined and treated in Chon Buri. The other case from the UAE is a 31 year old American boxing coach who arrived last Friday and tested positive for the virus 3 days later. He was quarantined and treated in Bangkok.
  • 2 people travelling from India tested positive for Covid-19. The Indian women, 25 and 55 years old, have family in Thailand. They arrived on September 30 and tested positive 12 days later. They were quarantined and treated in Bangkok.
  • A 50 year old Thai woman travelling from Japan tested positive for Covid-19. She arrived on October 7 and tested positive 3 days later. She was quarantined and treated in Chon Buri.

9 new Covid-19 cases detected in quarantine, all asymptomatic | News by Thaiger

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. you, specifically you in thailand reading this must, now be locked up for 2 weeks – no questions, no choice – you are a danger to society.

    Why? What!?

    You are infected and must be locked in quarantine immediately!

    But I’m not sick! I’m fine…

    NO, you are infected and asymptomatic, and are dangerous. GET IN THE VAN NOW!

    Same logic as what’s used on the ‘returnees’. Same ‘proofs’.

    This is NOT about a virus, this is about power and control.

  2. THAI ARE MILITARY COUNTRY ONLY
    IF NOT SINTOMS
    IT S MEAN NOT DANGEROUS
    DOCTORS IN THAILAND AND ALSO IN THE WORLD NEED BACK TO SCHOOL
    NO ONE HAVE KNOWLEDGE ………TERRIBLE
    DOCTOR JOE.
    IF NEED CONSULTING I WILL BE HAPPY TO GIVE IT

  3. … umm … yes, it’s about “control” – controlling the spread of the virus so Thailand doesn’t end up in the same state as the West where it’s out of control … despite the controls.

    … and if you haven’t got it yet, 80% of Covid-19 cases are asymptomatic so while they’re not “sick”, they’re infected and contagious.

    It’s not about “power and control” but about protecting people.

    Alternatively, of course, the government could use it’s “power and control” in a Western way, and close the bars, restaurants, schools, unis, gyms, dentists, etc, etc, and ban weddings, wakes, etc, etc … now I wonder which most people would prefer …

  4. I wonder if the number of virus cases found each day in Thai quarantine would go down if Thai returnees had a Covid19 test before flying? As it stands today all they require is a ‘fit to fly certificate’ which is obtained by a video call to Thai embassy in the relative country. A fit to fly certificate does not include a Covid 19 test. By contrast all westerners flying these days must have a Covid19 test, a fit to fly certificate from a recognised body, plus a COE and health insurance. Considering the vast number of Covid 19 virus cases in all countries, the chances of sitting next to an infected passenger, regardless of nationality, is quite high.

    1. I agree with you on all counts, JM, as although I’m in favour of strict border controls they need to be consistent, universal and simple and that’s where Thailand fails on all counts.

      I’m not sure that a pre-flight test for anyone serves much purpose, though, as they’re next to meaningless.

      At best, 3 to 7% are going to be wrong so that’s some 20 to 40 people per flight; at worst, they can’t be verified so anyone with PhotoShop and a printer could happily produce their own.

      Similarly health insurance, which is why only a limited number of providers are accepted so the insurance can be easily verified.

      There’s just too much scope for DIY.

      As you so rightly say, though, “considering the vast number of Covid 19 virus cases in all countries, the chances of sitting next to an infected passenger, regardless of nationality, is quite high.”

      Considerably higher, though, are the chances not just of sitting next to one but of using the same toilet, touching the same luggage bins, armrests, seat backs, handrails in departure areas, etc.

      1. I certainly agree with the requirement for a negative virus test prior to boarding a plane to Thailand. Unfortunately all that does is prove that you weren’t a carrier of the virus 76 hours prior to departure. You can certainly be exposed to a carrier between the test and the arrival in Thailand. There is no sure fire way of preventing exposure during this time frame. The Thai people who don’t depend on tourism for a living are against allowing tourists back. However, with the economy collapsing as it is without tourism, to me the question is, do you allow foreigners back in or do you let the country go bankrupt and let those who depend on tourism starve. It’s not an easy question to answer, I realize. The way I look at it is, every time I get in a car and travel anywhere, I take a chance of being killed in an accident. However that is a chance I have to take in order to make a living for my family and loved ones. Nothing in life is guaranteed except death at some point. So in summation, I say Thailand has to take the chances in order to survive.

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Caitlin Ashworth

Caitlin Ashworth is a writer from the United States who has lived in Thailand since 2018. She graduated from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and media studies in 2016. She was a reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette In Massachusetts. She also interned at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida.

8 Comments

  1. you, specifically you in thailand reading this must, now be locked up for 2 weeks – no questions, no choice – you are a danger to society.

    Why? What!?

    You are infected and must be locked in quarantine immediately!

    But I’m not sick! I’m fine…

    NO, you are infected and asymptomatic, and are dangerous. GET IN THE VAN NOW!

    Same logic as what’s used on the ‘returnees’. Same ‘proofs’.

    This is NOT about a virus, this is about power and control.

  2. THAI ARE MILITARY COUNTRY ONLY
    IF NOT SINTOMS
    IT S MEAN NOT DANGEROUS
    DOCTORS IN THAILAND AND ALSO IN THE WORLD NEED BACK TO SCHOOL
    NO ONE HAVE KNOWLEDGE ………TERRIBLE
    DOCTOR JOE.
    IF NEED CONSULTING I WILL BE HAPPY TO GIVE IT

  3. … umm … yes, it’s about “control” – controlling the spread of the virus so Thailand doesn’t end up in the same state as the West where it’s out of control … despite the controls.

    … and if you haven’t got it yet, 80% of Covid-19 cases are asymptomatic so while they’re not “sick”, they’re infected and contagious.

    It’s not about “power and control” but about protecting people.

    Alternatively, of course, the government could use it’s “power and control” in a Western way, and close the bars, restaurants, schools, unis, gyms, dentists, etc, etc, and ban weddings, wakes, etc, etc … now I wonder which most people would prefer …

  4. I wonder if the number of virus cases found each day in Thai quarantine would go down if Thai returnees had a Covid19 test before flying? As it stands today all they require is a ‘fit to fly certificate’ which is obtained by a video call to Thai embassy in the relative country. A fit to fly certificate does not include a Covid 19 test. By contrast all westerners flying these days must have a Covid19 test, a fit to fly certificate from a recognised body, plus a COE and health insurance. Considering the vast number of Covid 19 virus cases in all countries, the chances of sitting next to an infected passenger, regardless of nationality, is quite high.

    1. I agree with you on all counts, JM, as although I’m in favour of strict border controls they need to be consistent, universal and simple and that’s where Thailand fails on all counts.

      I’m not sure that a pre-flight test for anyone serves much purpose, though, as they’re next to meaningless.

      At best, 3 to 7% are going to be wrong so that’s some 20 to 40 people per flight; at worst, they can’t be verified so anyone with PhotoShop and a printer could happily produce their own.

      Similarly health insurance, which is why only a limited number of providers are accepted so the insurance can be easily verified.

      There’s just too much scope for DIY.

      As you so rightly say, though, “considering the vast number of Covid 19 virus cases in all countries, the chances of sitting next to an infected passenger, regardless of nationality, is quite high.”

      Considerably higher, though, are the chances not just of sitting next to one but of using the same toilet, touching the same luggage bins, armrests, seat backs, handrails in departure areas, etc.

      1. I certainly agree with the requirement for a negative virus test prior to boarding a plane to Thailand. Unfortunately all that does is prove that you weren’t a carrier of the virus 76 hours prior to departure. You can certainly be exposed to a carrier between the test and the arrival in Thailand. There is no sure fire way of preventing exposure during this time frame. The Thai people who don’t depend on tourism for a living are against allowing tourists back. However, with the economy collapsing as it is without tourism, to me the question is, do you allow foreigners back in or do you let the country go bankrupt and let those who depend on tourism starve. It’s not an easy question to answer, I realize. The way I look at it is, every time I get in a car and travel anywhere, I take a chance of being killed in an accident. However that is a chance I have to take in order to make a living for my family and loved ones. Nothing in life is guaranteed except death at some point. So in summation, I say Thailand has to take the chances in order to survive.

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