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Hong Kong residents protesters of new national security law arrested

Anukul

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Hong Kong residents protesters of new national security law arrested | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Al Jezeera
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Hong Kong residents protesting China’s new national security law found themselves arrested for unlawful assembly after fights broke out. Yesterday’s protest was largely supposed to be silent but ended with armed riot police arresting 53 people and using pepper spray on parts of the crowd after chanting and slogans were shouted towards them.

Such arrests may be an indication of the future protest landscape in Hong Kong, according to critics of the new law which the government says only targets those with extremist views. However, many people aren’t buying the law’s reasoning as they say it could further erode Hong Kong’s autonomy which was promised by the mainland when Britain handed the territory back in 1997.

“The governments wants to shut us up and to kick us out,” according to 44 year old protester Roy Chan.

“We must stand up and strike down all those people who deprive Hong Kong people’s freedom.”

Hong Kong residents protesters of new national security law arrested | News by The Thaiger

The protesters were charged with unlawful assembly as police refused to allow the annual march that is normally held on July 1 to mark the 1997 handover of Hong Kong. The reasoning for the refusal was due to the ban on large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic, but critics say the real reason is due to the recent law causing many to call out the government for potentially squashing their freedoms.

The law, according to Chinese officials, is supposed to only target a small group of people who display separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference in Hong Kong.

Chinese state media reported that lawmakers almost “overwhelmingly supported the draft”. The Chinese government has “unshakable determination to push ahead with enactment of the security bill and safeguard national sovereignty and interest,” state broadcaster CCTV reported, citing a government spokesperson.

The news comes after a vlogger had to delete the video of a local artist mocking the national anthem over fears that the documentary would not be allowed to air in Hong Kong. The decision not to air the material in the documentary came after China imposed a law that banned using the national anthem in a derogatory way, or in other words, mocking or changing the words in the song.

Read more: Hong Kong documentary sees scene removed after new law

SOURCE: Reuters
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My name is Anukul, I a writer for the Thaiger, I specialise in translation articles and social media, and assisting with our video production. I previously worked at Phuket Gazette and attended BIS international school in Phuket.

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Facebook blocks Hong Kong’s user data requests after China’s new security law

The Thaiger

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Facebook blocks Hong Kong’s user data requests after China’s new security law | The Thaiger

Facebook is blocking requests from Hong Kong to receive user data after China’s passing of a new national security law that reportedly aims to crack down on government critics. WhatsApp and Twitter are also included in the blocking of data requests with Facebook spokesperson Andy Stone saying it is stopping the review of such requests until it evaluates the new law and consults with international human rights experts.

“We believe freedom of expression is a fundamental human right and support the right of people to express themselves without fear for their safety or other repercussions.”

The new national security law was revealed at the end of June and has already had a muting effect on the city that has long been a haven for free speech and internet access from China’s mainland. Facebook reportedly works with law enforcement communities to promote safety, on and offline, but it reviews every request by law enforcement agencies to make sure they are legitimate.

Facebook and Twitter are accessible in Hong Kong, as part of the decrease in oversight under the “one country, two systems” commitments by Beijing. However, human rights advocates have criticised the new national security law, partly because China did not release a draft for the public to review before it took effect.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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Hong Kong

HK man arrested for allegedly stabbing officer in security law protests

Jack Burton

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HK man arrested for allegedly stabbing officer in security law protests | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Hong Kong police turned out in force to quash protests of China's new security law - The Thaiger

Police in Hong Kong arrested a man aboard a flight to London this morning on suspicion of stabbing a police officer during protests of the Chinese territory’s new security law. About 370 people were arrested during and after yesterday’s protests against the new laws, imposed by China to curb activities surrounding the anti-government protests that have racked Hong Kong for over a year. 10 of them were arrested for allegedly violating the new law, some of whom were in possession of material advocating Hong Kong’s independence.

The law, which took effect Tuesday, outlaws secessionist, subversive and terrorist acts, and “collusion with foreign forces” intervening in the city’s affairs. It has brought concern from the Special Administrative Region’s former colonial ruler Britain and other governments. Critics say it effectively ends the “one country, two systems” framework, under which the city was promised a high degree of autonomy when it reverted to Chinese rule in June 1997.

Police yesterday posted a photo on Twitter of a police officer bleeding from his arm, claiming that he was stabbed while making arrests during the protests and that the suspects fled.

The 24 year old suspect, surnamed Wong, was arrested on a London-bound Cathay Pacific flight, according to a police officer who spoke anonymously as he was not authorised to speak publicly. He said Wong bought the ticket yesterday and boarded the flight with no check-in luggage. He did not respond to air crew who called him by name, and was not in his designated seat. Police identified him after a sweep of the plane. Local media report that a relative tipped police off to his travel plans.

In a related development, Britain announced yesterday that it is extending residency rights for up to 3 million Hong Kong citizens eligible for the British National Overseas passport, saying that it will “uphold its historic duty to the former British colony”. Those eligible will be allowed to live and work in the UK for 5 years, before applying for settled status and subsequently for citizenship. China today threatened “counter measures”.

Australian PM Scott Morrison said today his government is considering a similar move, and Taiwan has opened an office to help Hong Kongers relocate to Taiwan for work and other purposes.

SOURCE: AP

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Australia and UK may offer a safe haven to Hong Kong citizens

Anukul

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Australia and UK may offer a safe haven to Hong Kong citizens | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Law.com

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison says Australia is “actively considering” providing a safe haven for Hong Kong citizens to migrate to the country after controversial national security laws enforced by China have come into effect.

Yesterday, hundreds of people were arrested after protesters took to the streets to protest the new laws introduced by China to suppress dissidents.

When asked if he was upset by the crackdown on demonstrators in Hong Kong and whether Australia should offer a safe haven for local residents, Morrison said, “The answer to both questions is yes and yes.”

Also in the UK, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that he would give qualified people in Hong Kong a path to citizenship that would enable them to settle in the United Kingdom.

SOURCE: ABC News

 

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