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Investigations begin into the sinking of Chao Phraya dinner cruise boat

The Thaiger

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Investigations begin into the sinking of Chao Phraya dinner cruise boat | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Nation Thailand
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75 passengers, crew and staff were rescued last evening after a triple-deck timber dinner cruise vessel capsized in Bangkok’s Chao Phraya River. Both Thais and foreigners were aboard the boat.

An investigation has begun into the incident. The vessel, called High Season, operating as a ferry and restaurant, listed to the right, capsized and then sank in the Chao Phraya River. No deaths or injuries were reported. The vessel is registered by High Season Resort Company, located in Trat province. The boat’s owners are being questioned to find the cause of the accident.

The ship had travelled from the Ramada Plaza hotel in the Charoen Krung area near the Sathorn Pier and was near the Marine Department offices when it started to list to starboard (right), according to the vessel operator Tassanai Kampangjeen. The vessel limped on to the Suan Somdej Pier near the Phra Pok Klao River to offload passengers before the High Season sank.
Jakkri Sriraksa, a staff from Khlong San Rescue Volunteer Foundation, told officials that the boat had picked up Thai and foreign tourists from a pier.

“The operator noticed that the ship was tilting to the right side, probably caused by a leak. They radioed the nearest pier for emergency embarking and safely evacuated all 75 passengers and staff on the shore.”

Officials have contacted the Marine Department to salvage the vessel from the Chao Phraya. There are no reports of the accident causing an damage to public property.

There was another vessel capsizing and sinking on Saturday night, about 2 nautical miles short of Don Sak pier in Surat Thani, whilst returning from Koh Samui. Bad weather and high seas up to 3 metres, caused the car ferry, Raja 4, to capsize and sink. The boat was carrying garbage trucks and a passenger vehicle. 3 people are still missing, feared drowned. 12 of the 16 passengers on board were employees of the Raja Ferry Company. The body of the captain of the ferry was found floating about 2 nautical miles from the scene of the incident yesterday afternoon.

Investigations begin into the sinking of Chao Phraya dinner cruise boat | News by The Thaiger

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    August 3, 2020 at 11:58 am

    What another boat sinks!
    A life jacket would sink in Thailand if the Thais had made it.

  2. Avatar

    James Pate

    August 3, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    It would be emergency DISembarking, not embarking. Also, the boat was evacuated, not the passengers. Evacuating a person means that you gave him an enema.

    • Avatar

      Peter the Troll

      August 5, 2020 at 12:09 pm

      “Evacuating a person means that you gave him an enema.” This is just ridiculous.

  3. Avatar

    rinky stingpiece

    August 3, 2020 at 12:47 pm

    Saying it was “probably caused by a leak” might be wishful thinking or a distraction from poor maintenance and poor loading.
    At least this time they managed to get everybody off before anything worse happened.

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Crime

Sarasas school teacher charged with assault for allegedly abusing students

Caitlin Ashworth

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Sarasas school teacher charged with assault for allegedly abusing students | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Prachachat

The Nonthaburi teacher, who allegedly beat and mistreated kindergarten students, faces charges of physical assault and violating the Child Protection Act. The charges follow reports of abuse after classroom surveillance camera footage from the Sarasas Witaed Ratchaphruek School spread on the internet. Videos show a teacher, identified as Ornuma “Khru Jum” Plodprong, pushing a child to the ground, dragging another across the room and repeatedly hitting the kindergarten students.

Your comments…

• School administrators must be investigated.

• About time. This kind of abuse is the norm in Thai schools and it’s about time they did something about it.

• How about the other 3 adults who were in that room when it happens . NONE of them went forward to help that poor kid.

• Many expat teachers I came across when my daughter was still at school were ‘illegal’ & while they should accept blame, the schools which charge for expensive expat teaching should be held accountable.

Police say more charges for violating the Teachers Act could follow. They say 8 parents are also planning on pressing separate charges. Following the reports of alleged abuse, the Office of the Private Education Commission, or OPEC, set up a committee to investigate all of the 42 Sarasas private schools around Thailand.

Khru Jum, along with staff who allegedly witnessed the abuse, were fired. OPEC teamed up with the Department of Mental Health to send psychiatrists to the school to evaluate children.

Other video footage from the Sarasas school in Nonthaburi, a suburb in Bangkok, shows a male teacher grabbing a student by the arm. The teacher was identified as a 25 year old Filipino man named Marvin.

The video has sparked an online backlash and immigration officials went to the teacher’s house to check his paperwork and also checked more than 70 other foreign teachers at the school. Immigration officials have now reported that the Filipino teacher is not legal to teach in Thailand, is only on a tourist visa and down’t have a work permit.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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Bangkok

7-Eleven delivery worker saves customer’s life

Caitlin Ashworth

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7-Eleven delivery worker saves customer’s life | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Komchadluek

7-Eleven employee reportedly saved a customer’s life who collapsed on the floor at the while taking a delivery in Bangkok’s Nong Khaem district. Wipassri Wanwichai had an asthma attack at the door and dropped to the ground, hyperventilating. The 7-Eleven delivery person Sumonsri “Tae” Pengthab called the emergency line and started giving her CPR.

“It would have been my last breath if it wasn’t for Tae. I am thankful and can say I have a good experience with 7-Eleven.”

Wipassri was taken to the hospital. The story was shared over the internet and the 2 later sat down for an interview. Tae said “clients are not gods, clients are family.”

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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Bangkok

When did Bangkok have its ‘good old days’?

The Thaiger

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When did Bangkok have its ‘good old days’? | The Thaiger
PHOTOS: packthailand.com

When did Bangkok have its golden era? Of course it depends on when you were visiting, how long you were here, where you stayed, and what you were doing at the time. But the city has certainly had some ‘eras’ in the past that people nostalgically and whimsically recall as ‘special’. Here’s a few of the responses about when Bangkok really hit its straps, when we asked people on The Thaiger Facebook page.

Everyone falls into the trap of remembering the ‘good old days’, but was there a time when Bangkok really did have a golden era?

Denny says that it was definitely in the 1970s when he first came to Bangkok with his wife. He said his friends thought it was a ‘very exotic’ choice at the time. Denny, from Massachusetts in the US, returned in the 1990s to live in the Big Mango but says it had lost a certain visceral appeal and was beginning to be ‘moulded’ as a tourist destination.

“Whilst I stood out in the 1970s no one really took much notice of me. By the 1990s some of the ‘ugly tourists’ had already made a reputation and we didn’t feel quite as welcome as we used to. Whilst in the 1970s there were still plenty of bicycles’d been completely replaced by the 1990s by the ubiquitous ‘motorcy’.

‘Simone’ said… “Late 80’s and the beginning of the 90’s, when the highest building was the Dusit Thani and the first disco was The Palace. You could just put a Motorola phone on a table at The Bubble and all girls were yours while the DJ was playing ‘One night in Bangkok’. You can write a book about those times.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

Another writer ‘Retire’ thought the golden era was a few decades earlier.

“I think Bangkok really came to life in the 60s when it started developing it’s own pop culture style in clothing, furniture, music and cinema. It sort of regressed into a bad version of everything western later or. But there was a bright, glimmering decade when Bangkok was the hip Asian city.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

‘Helmer’ and his wife were posted to Thailand as for a large foreign company in the late 50s.

“When I first visited Thailand in the late 1950s I would stand out and people would stop me in the street to take a photo with me. It was very ‘Thai’ then and very few people had any English skills at all. It was a very difficult place to live as a foreigner at that stage and things slowly improved during the 60s until we had to leave in 1969. There was no high-rise in those days and shopping was all at local markets. The only cars driving around those days were all imported and they had just started filling in the old klongs to make new roads.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

‘Malcolm’ thought the best places in Bangkok were out of the city.

“I think the late 80s in the tourist areas, then people discovered the real Thailand outside of these areas, some places are improving to this day but still not too touristy best to keep them a secret!”

‘Ray’ forecast posts from expats who would hang around the bar-girl scene at the time…

“Stand by for claims that “Thailand was so much better” when a bar girl would gush with gratitude and do cartwheels after receiving a 10 baht tip for fetching beers all afternoon and wiping down your fat, pock-marked back with an ice-cold towel.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

‘Glenda’ puts the golden era firmly in the 1970s.

“The 70’s, when we were posted there was magic. No big skyscrapers, one department store on Silom road and good shopping at small family shops. A couple of supermarkets and a great day out at what was then the weekend markets. We still visit but not what it used to be.”

‘Alicia’ first came to Bangkok in the early 2000s and recalls it as being an optimistic time for the city.

“They’d just opened the Skytrain (BTS) and the city was in its early phase of changing from ‘just another Asian city’ into a modern metropolis. I was teaching at the time, King Bhumibol was still making appearances at functions and the tourists were really starting to arrive in the millions, rather than in the thousands. Businesses seemed to be booming around that time and everything seemed happy and prosperous. It was the best five years of my life. Returning in 2017 it was a completely different city and appeared to carry the burden of a big city.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

‘Gordon’ was much more philosophical about the question…

“The “Golden Era” is relative to the age, gender, race, sexual orientation, income, social status, nationality and experience of the individual person. Hence, the Golden Era simultaneously occurs at all times past and present, and at no time ever.”

When did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The ThaigerWhen did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The ThaigerWhen did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The ThaigerWhen did Bangkok have its 'good old days'? | News by The Thaiger

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