ProtestsThailand

Anti-government activists reject idea of a “reconciliation committee”

PHOTO: Nation Thailand

Thailand’s pro-democracy activists have rejected the government’s suggestion of a reconciliation committee, saying it is merely aimed at keeping PM Prayut Chan-o-cha in power. The Khana Ratsadon 2563 (People’s Movement) group say the ongoing political conflict cannot be resolved as long as the current PM remains in power. They claim his position is illegitimate and has been from the start, as they double down on calls for his resignation. They have also repeated their other demands, namely for a re-write of the constitution and reform of the revered Monarchy.

Natchanon Phairot agrees, saying his group, the United Front of Thammasat and Demonstration, also rejects the idea of a reconciliation panel, adding that anti-government activists will not surrender. He says the PM’s resignation would be a good starting point for re-drafting the constitution.

(The Thai prime minister, under the 2017 Charter, could be nominated by a joint sitting of the parliament – elected MPs and the hand-picked Senate IF one party didn’t win over 50% of the vote. In the case of the March 2019 election no party was able to get over the 50% mark for votes so the PM was selected by the joint sitting, virtually guaranteeing General Prayut’s appointment. Prayut Chan-o-cha didn’t stand for election as an MP and was not elected to the position of prime minister by Thai voters)

Adding to the calls for the PM’s resignation, protest leader Jatupat Boonpattarasaksa says if the current administration retains its grip on power, attempts to end the political unrest will get nowhere. He points out that the more protesters feel their demands are being ignored, the more the protests will grow.

“We want changes and we will stick to a non-violent approach. We don’t know when the government will step down, but we’ll continue our fight.”

Meanwhile, the Bangkok Post reports that Sutin Klungsang from the opposition Pheu Thai Party, has changed his stance on the proposed reconciliation panel, saying that if the government initiates an attempt at unity, his party would be willing to participate. He is calling on officials to work more closely with civil groups, in order to reach a resolution. He wouldn’t be drawn on the protesters’ 3 key demands, but says that all issues, including controversial subjects (code for ‘reform of the Monarchy’), should be up for discussion.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Refusing to take part doesn’t do them much credit either locally or internationally – they could still keep up the protests while at least participating.

    Demanding that the government agree to all their demands first, before they’ll even discuss anything, really isn’t either realistic or a good basis to start negotiations from and they’re very unlikely to get any more active and broader based support as a result. Their protest is starting to look increasingly insular and isolated, which is largely their own fault.

  2. Their protests are starting to look increasingly more effective and likely to change things. which is largely their own fault.
    READ the article. T
    he present P.M. was not elected to the position of Prime minister by Thai voters.
    He did not even stand for election as an M.P.
    He corrupted his way in with the help of his pals.

    1. Ummm …. I have “READ the article”.

      Maybe you missed the last para, as there weren’t enough pictures:

      “the Bangkok Post reports that Sutin Klungsang from the opposition Pheu Thai Party, has changed his stance on the proposed reconciliation panel, saying that if the government initiates an attempt at unity, his party would be willing to participate. He is calling on officials to work more closely with civil groups, in order to reach a resolution. He wouldn’t be drawn on the protesters’ 3 key demands, but says that all issues, including controversial subjects (code for ‘reform of the Monarchy’), should be up for discussion.”

      Without appealing to more people it’s going to remain a student protest movement without the broad base of support it needs to effect change – if Pheu Thai desert them, as appears to be the case, then they’re unlikely to get that support. It really isn’t hard to understand – it’s classic ‘divide and rule’ which the students are falling for.

      “The present P.M. was not elected to the position of Prime minister by Thai voters.” etc …

      Yes, but that’s the constitution as it stands now; the only way to change it is to change the constitution. Similarly, Trump wasn’t elected to the position of President by American voters, as he lost the popular vote by 3 million votes, and neither had he previously been an ‘MP’.

      I’m not being an apologist for the PM or aanyone else, but just pointing that the students are far from being as effective as they could be and they’re losing support outside their student base, and that the West isn’t eaxctly a great role model.

      So how are things with protests in your part of the world? Allowed to carry on without undue human rights abuses? Free and fair elections? Nobody corrupting their way in with the help of their pals? Oh …..

  3. Same excuse to justify the corrupt Thai.
    Trump did the same.
    This is not valid and stop using this. We are discussing the corrupt Thai.
    What next? Are you going to quote north Korea abuse of democracy and therefore justify the scum politicians that operate in Thailand.
    And now you try to involve the Cambodian administration.
    The dictators in Cambodia rules with a light hand.
    Very few restrictions. None that effect the dirty ferang.
    I would have no objection if the Thai government acted the same.
    In fact I have met many ferangs here that live without a passport or visas.
    Thailand is ruled by corrupt dictators and tyrants, and just because it happens elsewhere will not make it right.
    Do not lie and write: I am not being an apologist for the PM and aanyone else.
    That is exactly what you are doing – and learn to spell.
    “The west is not eaxctly a great role model.” Which part of the west do you refer to?
    What all of the west?
    You really are writing rubbish. Are you drunk. And learn to spell!

  4. Sorry to remind you, but you’re the one who suggested Thais were looking at the US with “envy”!

    … and it’s no surprise to see that you’re so happy about things in Cambodia from a strictly farang perspective, while you couldn’t care less about the locals who are carted in to PP by the truckload every day from shanty towns to slave away in garment factories, while their country is sold around them by HS and his family (45% is foreign owned or leased).

    … which part of the West? At the moment, with a handful of exceptions, you can take your pick.

    Spelling? Aaah, the spelling / grammar police, the last refuge of the debate failure. Actually typos, rather obviously – big fingers, small phone.

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6 Comments

  1. Refusing to take part doesn’t do them much credit either locally or internationally – they could still keep up the protests while at least participating.

    Demanding that the government agree to all their demands first, before they’ll even discuss anything, really isn’t either realistic or a good basis to start negotiations from and they’re very unlikely to get any more active and broader based support as a result. Their protest is starting to look increasingly insular and isolated, which is largely their own fault.

  2. Their protests are starting to look increasingly more effective and likely to change things. which is largely their own fault.
    READ the article. T
    he present P.M. was not elected to the position of Prime minister by Thai voters.
    He did not even stand for election as an M.P.
    He corrupted his way in with the help of his pals.

    1. Ummm …. I have “READ the article”.

      Maybe you missed the last para, as there weren’t enough pictures:

      “the Bangkok Post reports that Sutin Klungsang from the opposition Pheu Thai Party, has changed his stance on the proposed reconciliation panel, saying that if the government initiates an attempt at unity, his party would be willing to participate. He is calling on officials to work more closely with civil groups, in order to reach a resolution. He wouldn’t be drawn on the protesters’ 3 key demands, but says that all issues, including controversial subjects (code for ‘reform of the Monarchy’), should be up for discussion.”

      Without appealing to more people it’s going to remain a student protest movement without the broad base of support it needs to effect change – if Pheu Thai desert them, as appears to be the case, then they’re unlikely to get that support. It really isn’t hard to understand – it’s classic ‘divide and rule’ which the students are falling for.

      “The present P.M. was not elected to the position of Prime minister by Thai voters.” etc …

      Yes, but that’s the constitution as it stands now; the only way to change it is to change the constitution. Similarly, Trump wasn’t elected to the position of President by American voters, as he lost the popular vote by 3 million votes, and neither had he previously been an ‘MP’.

      I’m not being an apologist for the PM or aanyone else, but just pointing that the students are far from being as effective as they could be and they’re losing support outside their student base, and that the West isn’t eaxctly a great role model.

      So how are things with protests in your part of the world? Allowed to carry on without undue human rights abuses? Free and fair elections? Nobody corrupting their way in with the help of their pals? Oh …..

  3. Same excuse to justify the corrupt Thai.
    Trump did the same.
    This is not valid and stop using this. We are discussing the corrupt Thai.
    What next? Are you going to quote north Korea abuse of democracy and therefore justify the scum politicians that operate in Thailand.
    And now you try to involve the Cambodian administration.
    The dictators in Cambodia rules with a light hand.
    Very few restrictions. None that effect the dirty ferang.
    I would have no objection if the Thai government acted the same.
    In fact I have met many ferangs here that live without a passport or visas.
    Thailand is ruled by corrupt dictators and tyrants, and just because it happens elsewhere will not make it right.
    Do not lie and write: I am not being an apologist for the PM and aanyone else.
    That is exactly what you are doing – and learn to spell.
    “The west is not eaxctly a great role model.” Which part of the west do you refer to?
    What all of the west?
    You really are writing rubbish. Are you drunk. And learn to spell!

  4. Sorry to remind you, but you’re the one who suggested Thais were looking at the US with “envy”!

    … and it’s no surprise to see that you’re so happy about things in Cambodia from a strictly farang perspective, while you couldn’t care less about the locals who are carted in to PP by the truckload every day from shanty towns to slave away in garment factories, while their country is sold around them by HS and his family (45% is foreign owned or leased).

    … which part of the West? At the moment, with a handful of exceptions, you can take your pick.

    Spelling? Aaah, the spelling / grammar police, the last refuge of the debate failure. Actually typos, rather obviously – big fingers, small phone.

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