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Human Rights Watch condemns latest Bangkok protest arrests

Jack Burton

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Human Rights Watch condemns latest Bangkok protest arrests | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Yahoo News Australia
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New York-based watchdog Human Rights Watch is strongly condemning the arrests of 7 pro-democracy campaigners and 2 anti-establishment rap performers in Thailand. In a strongly worded statement ,calling for their immediate release, Human Rights Watch says the arrests violate pledges made by the Thai government to respect human rights at a time of swelling protests against its rule. According to Brad Adams, the group’s Asia director…

“The Thai government’s repeated promises to listen to dissenting voices have proven meaningless as the crackdown on pro-democracy activists continues unabated. The authorities should right their wrong and immediately drop the charges and release Anon Nampa and other detained activists.”

The arrests were carried out last night and this morning. Anon, an outspoken attorney who’s led Thai Lawyers for Human Rights and was previously arrested after he broached the topic of reforming Thailand’s revered Monarchy, was taken into custody in front of the Bangkok Criminal Court, where he was meeting clients for an unrelated court hearing. Police have also arrested Baramee Chairat, Korakot Saengyenphan, Suwanna Tanlek, Todsaporn Sinsomboon, Thanee Sasom, Nathawut Somboonsup, and rappers Thanayuth “Book” Na Ayutthaya and Dechatorn Bamroongmuang, in relation to alleged transgressions to do with anti-government and pro-democracy sentiment.

Dechatorn has used the stage as a weapon against the regime ever since Thai hip-hop group Rap Against Dictatorship released the popular anti-government track What My F**king Country’s Got in 2018. He performed at Sunday’s mass rally at the Democracy Monument, which drew up to 10,000, alongside Thanayuth, a teen rapper from Bangkok’s Khlong Toei slum known as “ElevenFinger.” All those arrested were named in a recently leaked police list of 31 activists targeted for arrest.

Most of them are activists with the affiliated network of pro-democracy groups calling for the military-backed government of PM Prayut Chan-o-cha to step down. Baramee is a member of the Assembly of the Poor, Suwanna a member of the June 24 for Democracy Movement, and Korakot belongs to the Democracy Restoration Group. They face charges including sedition and are being held at Bangkok’s Samranrat Police Station.

Deputy PM Prawit Wongsuwan, a powerful retired general who now heads up the ruling Palang Pracharat party, declined to comment on the arrests, saying only that the police are doing their duty.

“The police are doing their jobs, following the law. If the law isn’t enforced, how can we live? It’s up to the police.”

Asked to comment on whether his government should provide a forum for youth protesters to express their opinions to stave off future conflict, “I don’t know” was Prawit’s only comment. He said he isn’t concerned about high school students nationwide throwing in their support by campaigning against the current regime.

SOURCE: Coconuts Bangkok

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1 Comment

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    Toby Andrews

    August 21, 2020 at 1:20 pm

    Well peaceful protests are not changing the government, despite all the supposed willingness to consider the protesters’ wants, plus the peaceful protesters are being arrested!
    It is time to not be peaceful . . .

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Jack Burton is an American writer, broadcaster, linguist and journalist who has lived in Asia since 1987. A native of the state of Georgia, he attended the The University of Georgia's Henry Grady School of Journalism, which hands out journalism's prestigious Peabody Awards. His works have appeared in The China Post, The South China Morning Post, The International Herald Tribune and many magazines throughout Asia and the world. He is fluent in Mandarin and has appeared on television and radio for decades in Taiwan, Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau.

Thailand

100,000 iLaw bill signatures to be verified, official tells staff to ‘hurry up’

Caitlin Ashworth

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100,000 iLaw bill signatures to be verified, official tells staff to ‘hurry up’ | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Line Today

The parliament president says he told staff to “hurry up” the process for verifying more than 100,000 signatures supporting a new constitution amendment bill proposed by a nonprofit organisation and backed by pro-democracy activists. Activists hope the process speeds up so the bill can be scheduled on the agenda for the next parliamentary session.

The draft, proposed by Internet Law Reform Dialogue, or iLaw, was sent to parliament last week along with signatures from more than 100,000 supporters. Parliament president Chuan Leekpai says staff are working on getting all of the signatures verified and even asked staff to “hurry up.” He says they have 45 days to verify the signatures. 50,000 valid signatures are required to have the draft considered by parliament.

The activists have been demanding a rewrite of the 2017 constitution for months.One of the proposed changes would require senators and local administrators. Currently, Thailand’s Senate is hand-picked by the ruling party.

Those opposing changes to the constitution also spoke up last week. A Thai Pakdee royalist group filed a petition with 130,000 signatures saying they are against changes.

Verifying the names is a lengthy process and Chuan doesn’t know exactly how long it will take. Half of the names on the iLaw bill have received initial verification, according to parliament advisor Sukit Atthopakorn.

After initial verification, the approved names are then forwarded to the Department of Provincial Administration to make sure they are eligible voters. The last step would calling each person to confirm they signed their name in support of the bill.

6 other amendment bills introduced by other political parties are already being discussed and a committee has been step up to review the bills, according to Democrat Party spokesperson Rames Ratanachaweng. He says those discussions won’t affect the iLaw bill.

SOURCES: Bangkok Post| Nation Thailand

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Politics

PM dismisses rumours of alliance with opposition to form new government

Maya Taylor

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PM dismisses rumours of alliance with opposition to form new government | The Thaiger
PHOTO: www.thailandnews.co

Thai PM Prayuth Chan-o-cha has rubbished rumours that the ruling coalition parties plan to join forces with the opposition Pheu Thai party to form a new government. While the PM initially didn’t respond to the question, instead bidding reporters a good day and walking away, he did mumble that he had enough of a headache with just one party.

Thai PBS World reports that Deputy PM, Prawit Wongsuwan, also dismissed the question, accusing the media of being behind the speculation, as he pointed a finger at reporters gathered at Government House.

“You go and ask the one who spread the rumour.”

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Anupong Paochinda has dismissed rumours he’s planning to set up a political party with the PM and interior Permanent Secretary, Chatchai Promlert. Anupong says he’s no political expert and has never considered creating a political party.

Since July, anti-government protests have been taking place around the country, with activists calling for the PM’s resignation, the dissolution of Parliament, and for fresh elections to be held.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

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Thailand

Majority in survey say now is the time to share ideas to solve conflicts

The Thaiger & The Nation

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Majority in survey say now is the time to share ideas to solve conflicts | The Thaiger

A majority of those surveyed in a recent Suan Dusit Rajabhat University poll say now is the time to work together to solve the conflicts that are plaguing the country. The poll, known as the Suan Dusit Poll, was conducted online from September 23-25, asked for opinions on the long-standing conflicts in Thailand.

1,263 online netizens responded with a large majority-almost 92% saying now is the time for all who are concerned to come together to brainstorm ideas on how to resolve the conflicts. The rest of the respondents, around 8%, said other things. Each respondent was given more than one allowed answer when asked for suggestions of how to fix the issues with almost 89% saying the government should be open to all opinions. Almost 88% said there should not be any violence, 82% said no double-standards, 74% said forums should be held nationwide to allow opinions, and 69% wanted the parties involved in the conflicts to take a step backward.

However, the question of who should lead the country in resolving these issues was split closely between pollsters wanting core members and representatives of different groups, the prime minister, and the people. Only around 13% pointed towards the government sector as taking the lead and lastly, around 9% pointing to the students and youth.

A majority of respondents, about 75%, agree that the brainstorming would be successful with almost 25% saying it would be unlikely to be successful. Such a poll comes after major anti-government student protests at Bangkok’s Thammasat University have rocked the nation, with some saying, for the first time, the rallies have thwarted the Lese Majeste laws in place that have historically put a muzzle on free speech and criticisms of the monarchy and King. Such protests have led to the arrestsof those leading the movement especially after a plaque was placedat the Grand Palace declaring that “Thailand belongs to the people.”

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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