Chiang MaiProtests

University student carves “112” into chest after being charged with violating lèse-majesté law

Stock photo via Thai PBS World

A Chiang Mai University student now has the numbers of “112” carved across his chest after using a razor blade on himself in defiance of the Section 112 of the Criminal Code, also known as the lèse-majesté law. The student took to cutting himself after arriving at the police station to face charges of violating the law. He was also charged with breaching the National Flag Act.

The 23 year old student and his colleague, are facing charges brought by political activist Srisuwan Janya after the duo allegedly placed an altered Thai national flag, featuring critical words against the monarchy, at an exhibition site at the university. Police tried to prevent him from harming himself further, as Vitthaya claimed it was an act of freedom of expression, but he was taken to the police station for first-aid treatment. The other student told reporters that he did not amend the Thai flag as police alleged, citing again, that it was a work of art. Both students are now released, but must come back to report themselves on May 31.

Thasanai Sethaseree, a university lecturer at the Faculty of Fine Arts, says the use of the Thai national flag in a work of art does not constitute a violation of the Thai National Flag Act. However, the lecturer didn’t comment on whether the words adorning the flag would constitute a violation of the lèse-majesté law, or Section 112 of the Criminal Code of Thailand.

Last Thursday, jailed student activist leader Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul was granted bail of 200,000 baht after repeated denials of bail requests over the last 2 months. Rung was detained on charges using Thailand’s strict lèse-majesté laws that carry a 15-year maximum sentence for insulting the royal monarchy and has been held without bail since March 8.

She joined her fellow activist leader Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak on March 30 in his hunger strike to protest the bail denials. Penguin was recently hospitalised over health concerns due to his hunger strike that began March 16.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

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Ann Carter

Ann Carter is an award-winning journalist from the United States with over 12 years experience in print and broadcast news. Her work has been featured in America, China and Thailand as she has worked internationally at major news stations as a writer and producer. Carter graduated from the Walter Williams Missouri School of Journalism in the USA.

5 Comments

  1. ‘ Vitthaya claimed it was an act of freedom of expression, but he was taken to the police station for first-aid treatment. ‘

    Hardly ‘carved’ if all it required was a first-aid kit. Pathetic.

  2. Protesting students are the shining beacons of decency binding the truth across the oceans of enlightened consciousness.
    A constant light upon the sewerage Thailand has become.
    The military leaders are traitors to the legacy of Aduljadee and anyone quietly supporting these thugs will suffer and perish.
    This is not fiction, look at the disgust:
    Polluted land, polluted oceans, polluted foods, it’s a hazard. A diminished vile population, voided of spirit, even the Buddha left, only minions now. But you like it that way, otherwise the uprising would have succeeded by now!
    And thinking that tourists will be streaming back, aahaha, what dumb cursed folks you are!
    You’ve become trash, expect trash tourism.
    Even people of China have standards now,
    even Russians cant handle the filth.
    In the end not many easy zips left, as the trampled flower has wilted and no fruit can enchants ever more.

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