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15,000+ Covid-19 patients in Japan on waiting list for hospitals and health care accommodations

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15,000+ Covid-19 patients in Japan on waiting list for hospitals and health care accommodations | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Kyodo News

Thousands of people in Japan who are infected with Covid-19 are on the waiting list for hospitals or other accommodations for those with the virus due to the rising number of cases. Kyoto News conducted a survey and reports at least 15,058 are on the waiting list for proper treatment and accommodation.

The number of new infections in Japan has been growing sharply since last November. Last Tuesday, Japan saw a rapid increase of new infections, including Tokyo. According to the WHO’s report as of yesterday, Japan recorded 4,587 new cases, 360,661 confirmed cases and 5,019 deaths.

In Japan, local public health officials are in charge of arranging hospital stays and treatment for people infected with the virus as well as the appropriate accommodation for people with mild symptoms. The process of making those arrangements is taking longer, and the newly infected people are forced to stay home because of bed shortages. Some are reported dead in their houses.

A survey by Kyodo News found Tokyo had the most infected people waiting to be hospitalised or accommodated at other facilities, jumping 4.8 times from 1,563 as of December 19 to 7,539. Every prefecture has reported a similar rise.

On January 7, Japanese PM Yoshihide Suga declared a state of emergency for 11 prefectures out of a total of 47 prefectures until February 7. Under the state of emergency, people are asked to stay home and restaurants are urged to shorten their opening hours.

SOURCE: Kyodo News

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13 Comments

13 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Issan John

    Monday, January 25, 2021 at 8:38 pm

    Sadly, I can recall some here saying three months ago how Thailand should follow Japan’s example and also start lifing travel and quarantine restrictions.

    • Avatar

      dispensed

      Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 10:04 am

      Japan allowed international travel? You don’t have to quarantine to go to Japan?

      That’s all news to me.

  2. Avatar

    Ben

    Monday, January 25, 2021 at 9:16 pm

    This is happening in California too. People sick with COVID are evaluated as they come into the hospital. Many are sent home to die. Those that can be saved are admitted and many are on hospital beds in the hallway because there are no rooms to put them in.

    I personally know a few people that refused to wear masks, got sick with COVID and showed up at the hospital and was sent home and died there. They were surprised there was no room for them. A shame because they still had a lot of life left to live but now they’re gone.

    Thailand is lucky they don’t have to go through this. Those that think Thailand should open up to tourists without quarantine to save their tourism sector don’t realize not many would come and they’d very badly hurt the rest of their economy along with their hospital capacity and a lot of death. Or even worse they don’t care.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 12:07 am

      It’s a tragedy.

      It’s not just the deaths directly from Covid, which at least in the UK are now widely recognised as having been under-reported, but the otherwise avoidable deaths and suffering because hospitals couldn’t treat or test those with cancer or other illnesses whose lives could have been saved.

    • Avatar

      dispensed

      Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 10:03 am

      That’s not what’s happening. Read the article.

      These are mild or asymptomatic cases. In non-thinking Asian countries, asymptomatic people are forced to go to the hospital for 2 weeks. That’s why the hospitals are full… full of people who aren’t sick.

  3. Avatar

    P D N

    Monday, January 25, 2021 at 10:23 pm

    If it really is that bad in Japan I would think their government would have done a lot more to contain and reduce it than shorten restaurants opening hours. They only have to look overseas to see that it won’t work, and also see what’s heading their way.

  4. Avatar

    Tony Jah

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 3:36 am

    I wonder if it’s illegal immigrants in Japan causing the sharp rise

  5. Avatar

    Tokyo is it

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 5:15 am

    There are many examples that can be followed, some may work out and some may not. Hindsight is marvellous but pointing out something only to try and put down others is neither helpful nor required. Japan will be fine, the people all follow the rules with great respect and dignity. However much we follow the social distancing, mask wearing and washing hands, in winters any respiratory illness will find a way of flourishing a lot more so than in warmer months. Come March their situation will be under greater control. Their country has dealt with the situation a lot better than many other countries.

  6. Avatar

    Tofu Man

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 5:47 am

    Some governments, rather than its public citizens, have a lot to answer for with their decisions in handling the situation which has caused tens of thousands of needless deaths. But i guess being in such power means no liability.

  7. Avatar

    Pihop

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 5:58 am

    Good morning english breakfast do anyone know if i can travel to view some land in Chiang Mai or is illegal? I from Petchaburi.

  8. Avatar

    Issan John

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 1:06 pm

    The effect on those needing hospital treatment that’s not related to Covid is as bad, if not worse, in the UK.

    In November last year 192,162 people in England (each part of the NHS in the UK is independent) had been waiting over a year for hospital treatment; the year before, pre-Covid, it was only 1,398.

    That’s well over one hundred times as bad.

    That’s not the old and infirm, but people with “normal” issues – hip and knee operations, transplants and cancer.

    It’s not just about those dying from Covid – it affects everyone, directly and indirectly.

  9. Avatar

    Jason

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 6:23 pm

    All the more reason to lockdown, even if for a short burst (3 days) to assess the situation. Although I reluctantly say that a 14 to 21 day full lockdown is what will break the cycle. At the moment,I think that full lockdowns are the best way to break the cycle and allow the hospitals to manage coping. Once vaccines are rolled out, in a planned way that protects the most vulnerable,we will see a change…but for now extreme caution….

  10. Avatar

    Tokyo is it

    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 9:28 pm

    Exactly, the indirect deaths due to bad decisions made for the handling of the pandemic. These deaths will be in the millions worldwide. Nothing to do with a very minor amount of people not following not putting on face masks.

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World

Is this the next big change in pop music? The winners of the IFPI Global Recording Artist of the Year Award, BTS

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Is this the next big change in pop music? The winners of the IFPI Global Recording Artist of the Year Award, BTS | The Thaiger

2020 IFPI Global Recording Artist of the Year Award. In the past 8 years the IFPI Global Recording Artist of the Year Award has been given to Ed Sheeran, Adele, One Direction, and Taylor Swift and Drake. BTS are backed up by ARMY, their huge fanbase.

The power of ARMY. The IFPI represents the recorded music industry worldwide. It’s not a Grammy or a popularity vote. The award is calculated according to an artist’s or group’s worldwide performance across digital and physical music formats during the past year. Everything from streams to vinyl, CDs and downloads…. and covers their entire body of work. The award was announced last week at the culmination of the IFPI Global Artist Chart, which counted down the top 10 best-selling artists of the past year.

And it’s certainly been a great year for music… not so much for going to live concerts but we’ve certainly had a lot more time to listen to our favourite artists and stream their clips on YouTube.

The group that won this year, based on their pure sales, actually came second in 2018 and 7th in 2019, so it isn’t some statistical blip on the music radar.

The win also represents somewhat of a quantum shift in world music… the sort of thing that only happens once in a generation. Rather than the popular cross-over style shift represented by the George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue in 1924, the brith of rock with Bill Haley in 1955 or the rise of British pop in the 1960s, personified by The Beatles, this year’s IFPI signals another generational milestone in tastes, method, world reach and engagement with fans.

In all the right-hand turns of the popular music genre, there has usually been a technological breakthrough that has accompanied them, or at least been a key aspect of their success.

In the case of the the Great American Songbook, the foundations of the pop music genre, it was the recorded record and the start of radio-as-entertainment in the 1920s that provided a method to reach a huge audience with the new sounds and tunes for the first time.

Then it was the 7” single that made music cheaper and easier to play, that revolutionised the radio music formats of the 1960s and provided the perfect vehicle of the British pop revolution to spread around the world.

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Myanmar

38 people die “bloodiest day” since Myanmar coup – United Nations

Caitlin Ashworth

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38 people die “bloodiest day” since Myanmar coup – United Nations | The Thaiger
Anti-coup protest in Myanmar on February 14 / Photo by Htin Linn Aye via Wikimedia Commons

38 people died during Myanmar’s anti-coup protests yesterday in what the United Nations is calling the “bloodiest day” in the country since the February 1 military takeover. UN special envoy for Myanmar Christine Schraner Burgener said the death toll is “shocking” and that the situation in the Southeast Asian country could lead to a “real war.”

Since last month’s coup, more than 50 people have died while many others have been wounded in protests against military rule. Witnesses say police and soldiers have opened fire with little warning. In a virtual briefing, the UN envoy said experts believe the Burmese police are using 9mm sub-machine guns to fire shots at civilians.

“I saw today very disturbing video clips. One was police beating a volunteer medical crew. They were not armed… Another video clip showed a protester was taken away from police and they shot him from very near, maybe one metre. He didn’t resist his arrest and it seems he died on the street.”

Burmese troops seized power of the civilian government last month, citing what they say was a fraudulent election, although the election commission said the vote was fair. A number of civilian politicians were arrested including democratic leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who had won the November election for state counsellor in a landslide.

Christine says more than 1,200 people are now under detention and many do not know where their loved ones are.

SOURCE: UN News | Aljazeera

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World

Muay Thai added to European Games 2023

Caitlin Ashworth

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Muay Thai added to European Games 2023 | The Thaiger
Stock photo via Wikimedia

Thailand’s national sport Muay Thai has been added to the European Games 2023, set to be held in Poland. While Asia has been leading the sport for decades, many recent Muay Thai champions are from Europe, according to Sakchye Tapsuwan, president of the International Federation of Muaythai Associations, the governing body for the sport.

“Europe has grown in strength, evidenced at the last two World Championships, where the overall winners were teams from Europe.”

Held by the European Olympic Commission, the European Games is considered a staging post to the Olympics. Thousands of elite athletes from 50 participating nations have the opportunity to compete in one of the 15 sports. Now Muay Thai, an ancient martial art dating back 1,000 years with ties to centuries-old traditions, is included on the list.

The format of the European Games is in line with the Olympic Movement standards for gender equality. The categories are equal for men and women with 7 male and female divisions and 2 coed teams. Creating equal opportunities for men and women fighters is a “vision” both the federation and the European Olympic Committee share, according to director of the federation, Charissa Tynan.

“For IFMA, gender equality is not about ticking the box, it is about ensuring that women and men have the same opportunities to shine together on one stage as one family.”

SOURCES: IFMA | EOC

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