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So who are these Thai students, and what are the protests about?

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What’s behind all the protests in Thailand right now? What are the protesters demanding? Who are they?

Since August, an organic, mostly young Thais, political movement has been building. It’s different from every other protest movement in the past. The people attending the rallies don’t really align themselves, or identify with, the past political factions. They’re not red shirts or yellow shirts. They are new and claim they’re seeking key changes to Thailand’s political system and the role and powers of the Head of State.

What are their demands?

In a 10 point manifesto read out for the first time on August 10, they demanded the standing down of the Thai PM Prayut Chan-o-cha, the dissolution of the Thai parliament, a new constitution to replace the 2017 Thai Charter, police to stop “harassing” them, and curbs on the powers of the Thai monarch. They claim the election was “fudged” (our interpretation of their words) and that the selection of the Thai PM by the Thai parliament was invalid.

Are their demands realistic?

It is unlikely that the current government would entertain any of the demands as it would result in their loss of “power”.

Who are the protesters?

They are mostly students with an average age well under 25 years old. The two largest groups call themselves the Free Youth Movement and the United Front of Thammasat and Demonstration.

Beyond that, it’s sort of complicated. There are other splinter groups pushing this and that issue including LGBT and women’s rights groups. But they are all united in the main thrust of central demands. The current protest phenomenon has also reached into secondary school classes with the Bad Student movement, which has seen the defiant raising of the 3 finger salute by previously compliant Thai school students during the morning assembly, flag raising and singing of the national anthem.

As a new generation of Thais, they also have little fear in raising “uncomfortable” issues that limited the previous generations of Thais. They’re the first protest movement to publicly utter the “unutterable” and openly criticise the role of the Thai monarch

What are their tactics?

So far the protesters have remained peaceful during the rallies, except for a few minor scuffles with police. Their main advantage is their youth, their weaponising of social media, their consistent, and relentless, demands and their resolve. In the latest round of cat-and-mouse protest games with police, the protesters have shown that are able to keep one step ahead of officials and can switch their tactics and locations in moments.

There’s also lots of them and have no problems in attracting rally crowds of 30,000+

How has the Prayut government responded?

The Thai PM had made it clear that he wanted to avoid violence at all costs in the past few months of student protests. But when a royal motorcade headed into a throng of protesters on Wednesday, the situation changed quickly and a State of Emergency was enacted less than 12 hours later.

How, or why, the motorcade was allowed to take a route straight into the path of an announced protest is up for debate, but the royalist prime minister saw the “interaction” as a bridge too far.

The government imposed a State of Emergency that bans gatherings of more than 5 people anywhere in Bangkok. It also forbids publication of posts, news or online information “that could harm national security”. It also allows police to arrest anyone linked to the protests and secure “any area” it deems necessary. That State of Emergency will last until November 14, unless the proclamation is extended.

Does it have anything to do with the Covid-19 pandemic?

No. The changes demanded by the protesters have been welling up for many years, long before the Covid-19 pandemic happened.

What reforms to the Thai monarchy are the protesters seeking?

Protesters are demanding a reverse in HM the King’s revised constitutional powers, which were put in place in 2017.

The activists say that the newly acquired powers are a wind back of the changes from Siam to Thailand in 1932 when the absolute powers of the monarch were removed by a new constitutional monarchy enshrining representative democracy (the country was formerly renamed on June 23, 1939). The protesters claim the monarchy is now “too close” to the Thai army and argue that this relationship is undermining Thailand’s democracy.

The protesters want HM the King to relinquish the additional controls he reclaimed over the palace fortune estimated to be in the vicinity of 30 billion dollars. He also took direct control over 3 battalions of the Thai army.

They’re also angry because HM the King endorsed PM Prayut and the Palang Pracharat party’s election and stitched-together coalition after the March 24, 2019 election. Opposition figures claim the election was “fudged” by using legal over-reach to cancel the votes of opposition MPs and disband parties.

Finally, protesters say that the Thai King spends most of the year in Bavaria in Germany, and point to his alleged extravagant lifestyle.

What’s the lèse majesté laws?

The lèse majesté laws are a draconian set of laws that prevent criticising or insulting the Thai monarch or royal family. Infringing the laws can result in a 15 year prison sentence. The monarchy is protected by Section 112 of the Thai Penal Code.

Has the palace or monarch made any comment about the current situation?

No

How do the lèse majesté laws work in practice?

In June, PM Prayut announced that the lèse majesté law would no longer be applied on the express wishes of His Majesty. But there has never been an official comment relating to this from the Palace.

But the police have still arrested and charged Thais for anti-monarchy or anti-King comments on social media by applying the Computer Crimes Act and laws relating to Sedition.

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24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Soots

    October 18, 2020 at 3:50 pm

    You forgot to ask; Who is funding the protests?

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 19, 2020 at 11:45 am

      The student protests?

      There’s no evidence of any “funding”.

      The counter-protests?

      Well, a glance at their transport is a bit of a clue!

  2. Avatar

    Grim Thinker

    October 18, 2020 at 4:05 pm

    In the year 2020 – everything is related to the covid 19 economic lockdown. It is a hostage type situation and young peoples dreams of travelling, working, creating buisnesses and saving are calously put on indefinate hiatus. The psychological effect alone is massive.

    • Avatar

      Don R

      October 18, 2020 at 4:54 pm

      It’s an interesting paradox because, while the young are more likely to suffer from the restrictions and less likely to die from the virus, polling shows that young people are actually more supportive of the restrictions. IMO this is insanity. These young people ought to realize that they’re literally fighting for their lives. Gen Y is an unwitting test subject in an experiment to see how many decades you can strip out of a person’s most productive years of life before you effectively kill them.

      On the other hand, those most at risk from the virus (elderly) tend to be less supportive of restrictions and less fearful.

      Nonetheless, most of our policy makers today (the people actually pushing the restrictions) are over 60, I dare say out-of-touch, high-income professionals who lived through (and squandered) the most prosperous era in history. I wouldn’t expect these people to have a capacity for empathy for the disadvantaged because they’ve never known what it’s like to truly sacrifice or face adversity.

      Prior to covid, young people in the US had amassed 1/5th the wealth their parents had at the same point in life. They’re shaping up to be a the new Lost Generation.

    • Avatar

      Johannes

      October 18, 2020 at 5:15 pm

      Agreed. As soon as the governments realize this, travel and international tourism and business will be reopened hopefully.

      In the end, ppl today all over the world has it easier than ever in history to create their own dreams in to reality.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 18, 2020 at 5:37 pm

      On your planet, possibly.

      Here, the protests have nothing, absolutely nothing, to do with Covid-19 or any “covid-19 economic lockdown” – possibly because there isn’t one in Thailand.

    • Avatar

      Packer

      October 18, 2020 at 7:49 pm

      How convenient – and how false and misleading – to blame the pandemic.

      From Brexit to Trump;
      from Xi’s indefinite rule (from 2018) to an unusual Thai election;
      from climate change to overpopulation;
      from fake news to questionable AI’s; the list goes on and on.

      All of them before 2020.

      There were many divisions and growing tenses well before the pandemic.

    • Avatar

      Erin

      October 18, 2020 at 8:24 pm

      Agree with Grim Thinker. While the protests may not be about Covid-19, they most certainly seem to be fueled by the psychological effects of Covid-19 and the economic shutdown. After months of protests and unrest in the U.S., it is interesting to read about Thailand having similar patterns of public outcry (albeit a different cause and less violence). Great article. Thanks for explaining this further for those not currently in Thailand.

  3. Avatar

    Jim

    October 18, 2020 at 4:39 pm

    Not a single mention of the water guns used Friday night. What kind of paper is this? I will unsubscribe if I don’t see fair reporting.

  4. Avatar

    BC

    October 18, 2020 at 5:52 pm

    Good to see a clear, well-written article. Nicely done 👍

  5. Avatar

    Issan John

    October 18, 2020 at 6:44 pm

    I get this strange feeling of deja vu …..

    Like its partner Opinion piece, I have to say that I think this is an excellent and well researched article.

    Where I disagree, though, is with the idea that “It’s different from every protest movement in the past.”

    They very much DO align themselves and identify with past political factions, and what’s more they say so, and their actions and politics are a direct and deliberate reflection of the 1932 coup and the then People’s Party, and their “Declaration” deliberately and pointedly echoes it: “Let all people know that our country belongs to the people – not to the king, as has been deceitfully claimed.”

    That wasn’t new, as many appear to think – that was lifted directly from the People’s party declaration in 1932, which is a part of Thai history:

    “All the people,

    When this king succeeded his elder brother, people at first hoped that his government would bring peace and security, but matters have not turned out as they hoped. The king maintains his power above the law as before. He appoints court relatives and toadies without merit or knowledge to important positions, without listening to the voice of the people. He allows officials to use the power of their office dishonestly, to take bribes in public construction and procurement, and seek profit from changes in the prices of money, which squanders the wealth of the country. He elevates those of royal blood to have more privileged rights than the people. He governs without principle. The country’s affairs are left to the mercy of fate, as can be seen from the depression of the economy and the hardships of making a living – something the people know all about already.

    The government of the king above the law is unable to bring about recovery. This inability to find solutions is because the government of the king has not governed the country for the people, as other governments have done. The government of the king has treated the people as slaves (or as they called them, peasants and serfs), as animals not as human beings. Therefore, instead of helping the people, it plants rice on the backs of the people. It can be seen that from the taxes that are squeezed from the people that the King is deducting many million of Baht per year for his own expenses, while the people must sweat blood in order to find just a little money. At the time for paying government tax or personal tax, if they have no money the government seizes their property or forces them into public works, while those of royal blood are sleeping and eating happily. No country in the world gave its royalty so much money as this, except the Tsar and the German Kaiser, whose nations have already overthrown their thrones.

    The King’s government has governed by deceiving and not being straightforward with the people. For example, by saying the King’s government would improve livelihood in this way and that, but time has passed, people have waited, and nothing has happened, nothing has been done seriously. Furthermore the people who should be shown gratitude for paying the taxes that royalty eats have been told they cannot yet have a voice in politics because they are ignorant. Such words from government are unacceptable. If the people are ignorant, the King is ignorant too, as we are all from the same nation. That people do not know what royalty knows is because royalty blocks them from full education in fear that if the people have education they will know the evil of royalty and not allow them to plant rice on their backs.

    Let all people know that our country belongs to the people – not to the king, as has been deceitfully claimed. It was the ancestors of the people who returned the independence of
    the country from the hands of the enemy. Those of royal blood just reap where they have not sown and sweep up wealth and property worth many hundred millions. Where did all these monies come from? From the method of farming rice on the backs of the people.

    The country is facing hardship. Farmers and soldier’s parents have to give up their paddy fields because cultivating brings no benefit. The government does not help. Everywhere the government lays off workers. Students who have completed their studies and soldiers released from the reserves have no employment, and go hungry according to fate. These things are the result of the government of the king above the law that oppresses minor civil servants, ordinary soldiers and clerks. They are not given pensions when discharged from service. In truth the monies that have been amassed by the government should used to run the country by providing work. This would be a fitting way to pay back the people who have been paying taxes for a long time to make royalty rich. But those of royal blood do nothing, just go on sucking blood. Whatever money they have they deposit overseas and prepare to flee leaving the people hungry while the country decays. All this is certainly evil.

    Therefore the people, government officials, soldiers, and citizens who know about these evil actions of the government have joined together to establish the People’s Party and have already seized power from the government of the king. The People’s Party sees that to correct this evil it must establish government by assembly, so that many minds can debate and contribute, which is better than just one mind. As for the Head of State of the country, the People’s Party has no wish to snatch the throne. Hence it invites this king to retain the position. But he must be under the law of the constitution for governing the country, and cannot do anything independently without the approval of the assembly of people’s representatives.

    The People’s Party has already informed the king of this view and at the present time is waiting for a response. If the king replies with a refusal or does not reply within the time set, for the selfish reason that his power will be reduced, it will be regarded as treason to the nation, and it will be necessary for the country to have a republican form of government, that is, the Head of State will be an ordinary person appointed by Parliament to hold the position for a fixed term. By this method the people can hope to be looked after in the best way, everyone will have employment because our country is a country of natural abundance. When we have seized the money which those of royal blood have amassed from planting rice on the backs of the people, and use these many hundreds of millions for nurturing the country, the country will certainly flourish. The People’s Party will govern and implement projects based on knowledge, not act like a blind man as the government of the king above the law has done. The People’s Party will:

    1. maintain securely the independence of the country in all forms including political, judicial, and economic etc.;

    2. maintain public safety within the country and greatly reduce crime;

    3. improve the economic well-being of the people by the new government finding employment for all, and drawing up a national economic plan, not leaving the people to go hungry;

    4. provide the people with equal rights (so that those of royal blood do not have more rights than the people as at present);

    5. provide the people with liberty and freedom, as far as this does not conflict with the above four principles;

    6. provide the people with full education.

    All the people should be ready to help the People’s Party successfully to carry out its work which will be for eternity. The People’s Party asks everyone who did not participate in seizing power from the government of the king above the law to remain peaceful and keep working for their living. Do not do anything to obstruct the People’s Party. By doing thus, the people will help the country, the people, and their own children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. The country will have complete independence. People will have safety. Everyone must have employment and need not starve. Everyone will have equal rights and freedom from being peasants, serfs and slaves of royalty. The time has ended when those of royal blood can plant rice on the backs of the people. The things which everyone desires, the greatest happiness and progress which can be called si-ariya, will arise for everyone.

    People’s Party
    June 24, 1932”

    That isn’t “new”, nor is it revolutionary – it was read out and leafleted in June 1932, by the Army, prior to the end of Thailand’s absolute monarchy and the beginning of democracy, then re-read and re-leafleted 88 years later in June by the United Front of Thammasat and Demonstration who have led the demonstrations for the last six months.

    It’s part of Thailand’s history, and openly available in Thailand and at times re-published in the media even though it’s apparently not in many of the approved history books.

  6. Avatar

    Kenneth P Paukner

    October 18, 2020 at 8:02 pm

    I saw a lot about what they would like to be done away with, but what do they intend to replace it with? We see a lot of this in the US do away with some thing and nothing about the replacement till it is in place and it turns out to be an absolute dumpster fire. Groups like this are always very short on details about what they would like to see the future look like, one of our own congress women “we must pass the bill before you can know what is in it” that worked out so well.

  7. Avatar

    Pat Kelly

    October 18, 2020 at 8:58 pm

    The Thai Government is telling these kids….u have no future . They want zero Covid in the country & will keep the borders locked to keep it that way. No way to run a government in 2020.

  8. Avatar

    Alan

    October 18, 2020 at 9:05 pm

    The youth of Thailand are to be respected for standing up for a country that is their future and they think it. Ab better and not controlled by a few old men propped up politicians who threw their lot in with them for a position in a failed gov

  9. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    October 18, 2020 at 9:27 pm

    Er Well read previous posts and you might find out.
    I, and others do not care to repeat ourselves.

  10. Avatar

    John Barrymore

    October 18, 2020 at 10:26 pm

    Notice the word manifesto. The language is typical of leftist revolutions. These demands are idiotic and purely polemical. The source is Western money where they have control of big tech, media, the schools, the film industry and much of the government. These powerful leftist groups send organizers around the world to foment discontent and anarchy. The goal is to bring down free enterprise and democracy and replace it with totalitarianism.

    • The Thaiger & The Nation

      The Thaiger & The Nation

      October 19, 2020 at 9:12 am

      The English word ‘manifesto’ was The Thaiger’s best guess at a translation. Air Asia publish their daily ‘manifesto’ for flights. I think you’re reading too much into the use of the word. We have seen no evidence of ‘leftist’ foreign groups tinkering with this student movement. We are well connected with the issue and would be pointing out any ‘interference’ if we saw it.

      • Avatar

        John

        October 19, 2020 at 11:05 am

        The 3 finger salute is from the movie the Hunger Games…
        And the director was the father of the supposed shooter “Elliot Rodgers”.
        Possibly the worst False Flag actor of all times.

        According to Bristol University researchers acting under FOIA requests a certain agency had its hand in over 800 Hollywood movies….

      • Avatar

        matt

        October 19, 2020 at 11:15 am

        ignore him. he’s likely a US QAnon idiot posting in places to foment troubles and spread his moronic “conservative” drivel.

  11. Avatar

    chris

    October 19, 2020 at 9:55 am

    It all seems suspicious to me. I know Thailand isn’t the most democratic place on earth but i also think it’s in other countries interests to destabilize Thailand so they can get their ‘meat hooks’ into the running of the country.

  12. Avatar

    Issan John

    October 19, 2020 at 1:08 pm

    So any protests against a military regime, anywhere, aren’t about “democracy” but are due to “other countries” trying to gain influence?

    Seriously?

  13. Avatar

    Mallory

    October 27, 2020 at 3:02 am

    Ahead of the cards are given you need to location a bet which establishes how much anyone
    stand to win or eliminate regardless of result.

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Protests

Some Thai students decide to boycott their graduation

The Thaiger

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Some Thai students decide to boycott their graduation | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Thai PBS World

Their Majesties the King and Queen of Thailand will attend Thammasat University’s graduation ceremonies tonight and tomorrow evening. But there’s been a growing contingent of graduates who are boycotting the ceremony as a personal protest in relation to current rallies around Thailand about government and constitutional reform.

The night, the biggest night of a student’s schooling, is a special event for many Thai students when a member of the Royal Family frequently attend the ceremonies to confer the degrees in a parade of passing students.

The protests, that started back in July by a core of university students, openly mentioning the reform of the Thai Monarchy for the first time, have now morphed into a common thread of discussion in social media. The role of the Thai Monarch, in the past a taboo topic for polite conversation in Thailand, is now being subjected to frequent media coverage and discussion.

Usually a night to remember for many students, it’s not completely uncommon for graduating students to miss the commencement ceremony. The highly choreographed graduation ceremonies are voluntary although the chance to accept their certificate from a member of the Royal Family, including the photo that would take pride of place in homes around Thailand, is usually not passed up.

Now a rump of students, not only at Thammasat, are taking the opportunity for a significant personal protest, and deciding to forgo the ceremonies and make their own symbolic statement about the current protest issues. In most cases the events involve an entire day of rehearsals, culminating in mere seconds as they receive their rolled-up certificate in a regimented, solemn and formal ceremony. There can also be quite a lot of costs involved with the hiring of graduation garments with strict dress codes surpassing the wardrobes of many of the young students.

One post itemised the costs including up to 500 baht for a new skirt, a 1,000 baht for hair and grooming, including a hair cut and dyeing their hair back to black if they’d decided to go ‘colour’ during their studies, and a pair of shoes for up to 1,000 baht. Then there’s make-up fees, a photographer (some graduation photos can be ‘event’ in themselves), both adding another 6,000-10,000 baht to the costs.

Some protesters earlier this month announced on social media posts that they were missing their graduation describing it as a “superfluous and onerous event”. Although plenty of graduates have missed the ceremonies in the past for various reasons, now they’re posting about their boycott, complete with explanations calling for reforms for the role of Thailand’s Head of State.

Some graduates have also taken to social media explaining why they will be attending the graduation ceremonies, in most cases saying they will attend for the benefit of their parents.

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Protests

Court rejects bid to arrest activists who led march on German Embassy

Maya Taylor

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Court rejects bid to arrest activists who led march on German Embassy | The Thaiger
Monday's gathering at the German Embassy in Bangkok - PHOTO: เยาวชนปลดแอก - Free YOUTH

A bid to apprehend 5 anti-government activists, who led a march to the Germany Embassy on Monday from the Sam Yan intersection, has failed, after a court in Bangkok rejected a police application for arrest warrants. The Bangkok South Criminal Court has turned down an application from Pitak Suthikul, acting superintendent of Thungmahamek police in Bangkok.

Pitak had requested arrest warrants for Passarawalee Thanakijwibulpol, Korakot Sangyenpan, Chanin Wongsri, Cholathit Chotsawas, and Benja Apan, who would have faced charges of sedition and other offences, if taken into custody. However, the court told officials to instead issue a summons, given that the protesters are students who only gathered for a short time and are unlikely to flee.

On Monday, protesters marched to the German Embassy to submit a petition calling on the country’s government to investigate whether Thailand’s Head of State conducted official business while in Germany. The German government has responded to confirm there has been no violation of the country’s ban on conducting foreign politics on German soil.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Tests show Samui woman did not contract virus at quarantine hotel

Maya Taylor

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Tests show Samui woman did not contract virus at quarantine hotel | The Thaiger
PHOTO: WHO/Ploy Phutpheng

Tests carried out by the Disease Control Department show that the woman who tested positive for Covid-19 after being discharged from quarantine and travelling to Koh Samui, did not become infected at the quarantine facility. Dr Sopon Iamsirithaworn says the results do not match those of 2 other guests who tested positive at the hotel in Samut Prakan, just outside Bangkok.

Tests show that the woman, who has dual Thai/French citizenship, contracted the infection 17 days earlier. However, Sopon says that while officials are still unsure as to where she became infected, the existing guidelines for quarantine facilities need to be reviewed.

“Though we haven’t found the source of her infection, we still have to revise our guidelines for alternative state quarantine sites and cut down the risk of spreading the virus.”

A national quarantine policy, currently at draft stage, sets out strict safety and hygiene standards for all quarantine facilities to adhere to. The guidelines cover everything from screening for suspected cases, data collection and reporting, as well as the provision of services and overall management of the venues. Health officials are also proposing cutting quarantine to 10 days and using movement tracing for an additional 4 days after guests are discharged.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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