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Foreigners arrested over eco-vandalism off Koh Phangan

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PHOTO: Supapong Chaolan

A Hungarian and Dutch man have been arrested for picking up sea animals and taking photos with them whilst diving off Koh Phangan in the Gulf of Thailand. They then posted them on social media, probably oblivious to their potentially criminal act. Police described the two as “long-stayers on Koh Phangan”. Their selfies sparked plenty of outrage from Thai netizens who take this type of eco-vandalism very seriously.

“We tracked down the suspects and identified them as Attila Ott, a Hungarian, and Francesco Simonetti, from The Netherlands. Ott is a diving instructor and owner of Pink Panther Scuba Dive Club on Koh Pha Ngan, while Simonetti is a chef at Il Barracuda Restaurant & BBQ, also on Koh Pha Ngan.”

“Salad Beach is a protected area, which makes their actions punishable by a maximum fine of 100,000 baht or 1-year imprisonment, or both.”

Police charged the 2 men with “intruding in an area designated for environmental protection”.

In the video (below), the duo are seen “tickling” marine life with their selfie stick and taking photos with them.

Department of Marine and Coastal Resources director-general Sophon Thongdee reported the pair’s misdemeanours to the media yesterday. The two had confessed to taking photos and video with sea animals at Salad Beach on Koh Phangan and then posting them on the internet. But officials were sufficiently unhappy with the duo’s antics they decided to throw the book at them.

They investigated the suspects’ travel history and fined Simonetti for failing to notify immigration officials within 24 hours after changing his address.

“Meanwhile, Kritiyaporn Khamsing, Ott’s wife, was also fined for failing to notify immigration officials in 24 hours after taking in an immigrant who was allowed to stay in Thailand temporarily.”

“If you find any offenders of marine and coastal resources, please contact call centre 1310 immediately.”

เหมาะสมหรือไม่..!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ดำน้ำแล้วไปจับสิ่งมีชีวิตใต้ทะเลมาถ่ายรูปแบบนี้…

Posted by สิทธิโรจน์ แก้วหนองเสม็ด on Sunday, August 30, 2020

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

 

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Avatar

    sam thompson

    Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 8:09 am

    If the guy owns and runs a ‘Scuba Dive Club’ then he should or would understand the rules and the consequences of his stupid actions and would not be ‘oblivious to their potentially criminal act’

  2. Avatar

    Preesy Chepuce

    Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 9:43 am

    This kind of hostility towards farang is incredibly stupid and short-sighted given how desperately Thailand needs tourism and farang knowledge transfer.
    Fining for the address issues just looks like a shakedown for cash.
    The smart response would be to put them on marine ecology training courses and litter picking duties on the beach to make amends and publicise that, but instead they have the bad publicity of saying don’t come on a diving holiday to Thailand. Not gonna get any tourism recovery with actions like this against farang. They probably genuinely didn’t have a clue that what they were doing was a problem.

    • Avatar

      Alan

      Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 10:48 am

      Foreigners have no business messing with Thai life, when the countries they come from have been negligent toward their own eco system, I mean the whole European Union. The key word is respect. Give them the maximum penalty. They give foreign tourists a bad name.

      • Avatar

        rinky stingpiece

        Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 2:41 pm

        What a plonker you are. Are you pretending to be a farang?! lol
        They didn’t “mess with Thai life”, they swam into an MPA and fondled a few creatures without realising it. The EU has far stronger marine protection than Thailand, but as you’re not an expert in that area, you wouldn’t know.
        If plonkers treat tourists so harshly, they will give Thailand a bad name… as you say, the key word is respect… respect farang, they are the customers, actions like this are bad publicity for Thailand tourism, the correct response is education and engaging people in looking after the marine environment. The DCMR understands this, which is why they actively recruit farangs to be marine rangers.

      • Avatar

        Steven Turner

        Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 3:42 pm

        yes lets give them 10 years hard labour and there familys for touching marine life hahah Alan you are a plonker

    • Avatar

      David

      Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 3:43 pm

      Typical farang action no care for anything in Thai national park is a diving instructor so he knows what he is doing So he set this example when he takes groups on diving tours . He should be ban from Thailand for 3 years and have his divers certification cancelled for the same period. Throw the book at him and you farang sympathisers with this type of behaviour need a wake up call also. Farang should be setting an example that’s why Thai don’t respect us because of morons like this. He will just pay his way out and continue his shit attitude

      • Avatar

        Jim

        Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 9:37 pm

        Was this google-translated from your language, “David”?

  3. Avatar

    Jim

    Thursday, September 3, 2020 at 1:26 pm

    When I come across a spiteful and brainless chav like you, Alan, I begin to understand why Thailand wants to get rid of farangs.

  4. Avatar

    TS

    Friday, September 4, 2020 at 6:48 pm

    Shocking crime of extreme animal cruelty. Actually picking up and snapping a pic of the rare endangered sea slug, prolly giving it momentary flash blindness. Thank gawd they posted this on facebook or we’d never know. For this, they’ll be fined heavily, lose their jobs, deported and blacklisted.

  5. Avatar

    Christopher Williams

    Friday, September 4, 2020 at 8:45 pm

    Alan without knowing the full story you’d have them locked up and the key thrown away. Most reasoning persons would wait for the court outcome.

  6. Avatar

    Michael Lewis

    Sunday, September 6, 2020 at 7:52 pm

    A common sea cucumber, you can find hundreds of these under the sand along Jomthien beach any day you choose and you can pick all of them up for free without worrying if someone is about to lock you up and relieve you of your successful business.

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Environment

It’s cicada season and America is preparing for billions to emerge after 17 years of hiding

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Stock photo via Pixabay

Americans are preparing for billions of cicadas to emerge after spending 17 years underground. Some are thinking it’s their worst nightmare to see and hear the insects as they will undoubtedly swarm their yards and porches. Their semi-hard skin, that is shed, will also be a sight to see, if there are, indeed, billions coming out.

In Thailand, and most other countries, cicada season is just about here, with the deafening noises sure to grace the outdoor air. But Thai people are more accustomed to seeing Cicadas in food form. As it is a delicacy in the northeastern or Isaan areas of the country, the females are more prized as they are considered to have more meat. Cicadas are also used in traditional Chinese medicine formulations.

The arrival of the swaths of cicadas in the US is being called Brood X, as it features billions of cicada nymphs that will burst from the soil, shed their skin, mate, lay eggs and then die. And, the noise of the male cicadas trying to find a female to “make eggs with”, will be deafening. The last time Americans had to deal with a cicada invasion, was during George W Bush’s time as president.

For those interested in the arrival of cicadas, or who may want to eat them, there are websites and social media groups being dedicated to their arrival, which could be any day now. One person says just watching them morph into their adult form in under 1 hour is fascinating.

Another, who is more interested in using them for cooking, says there are websites that feature the insects in recipes. From mixing them with mushrooms or chocolate, or even frying them, it’s sure spark anyone’s curiosity as they sit inside, hearing and seeing billions of cicadas invade their lawns. Ranging from cicadas with mushrooms or with chocolate, there is something for everyone’s palate. Or at least, for those happy to eat bugs.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

 

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Thailand

Covid-19 outbreak contributes to elephant population decline in Southern Thailand

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The following was submitted by the Southern Thailand Elephant Foundation.

There has been a significant decline in the elephant population of Southern Thailand as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. In Phang Nga Province, which normally has more domesticated elephants than any other Southern Thailand province, the elephant population has dropped by a third of its normal number.

This fall in elephant numbers is linked directly to the Covid-19 pandemic and the decimation of Thailand’s tourist industry (even now there is a Covid emergency decree in place in Thailand). Without tourists to visit the elephant parks and sanctuaries that abounded in the region, there is no income and therefore no money to buy food for the elephants.

The realisation that the Covid-19 lockdown would affect the tourist industry for the long term meant that many mahouts had little choice but to return to their homes and families, many of which are in the north of Thailand. Of course, they took their elephants with them, and so, at least for now, Southern Thailand has been depleted of its elephant population.

Some owners transported their elephants to Surin, a major elephant centre in northern Thailand, from where some government support is being provided during the pandemic. But this is a journey of more than 1,200 kilometres and many owners cannot afford the cost of a truck ride for their elephant over such a distance.

Most of the elephant parks and camps in Southern Thailand are now closed, and some will never reopen. Only a few parks or sanctuaries are still operating, and these are managing to care for their elephants only as a result of their own fund-raising efforts. Some of these parks have even taken in other elephants from owners who were struggling to feed them. Adult elephants drink around 100-200 litres of water a day and consume 200-300 kilograms of vegetation, costing more than 400 baht a day to feed.

When the lockdown first came to Thailand, many elephant parks in the region had closed almost overnight and simply told the elephant owners to remove their animals. But these owners were mostly mahouts who had one or two elephants contracted to a tourist park.

Without any income from the park, the mahouts were left struggling to feed their elephants and they had no money to send back to their families. Aware of the impending crisis as the parks closed their doors, the Southern Thailand Elephant Foundation stepped in to provide food for the elephants in need.

Our ‘Feed the Starving Elephants’ campaign, which ran from April to July last year, raised more than 1.7 million baht and our volunteers on the ground in Southern Thailand delivered over 700 truckloads of food. As the drift north began last summer, and the number of elephants in the region declined, the foundation was able to wind down its campaign.

When tourists eventually return to Southern Thailand in significant numbers, hopefully, the elephants will return too. For so many people, the chance to get up close, stroke, and feed these magnificent creatures is the highlight of their holiday.

 

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Environment

Mekong unseasonal water levels endanger nesting birds in Thailand

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An egg from a flooded nest in 2018 (Image: Bueng Kan Rak Nok)

The following story was written by Tyler Roney for Third Pole, a “multilingual platform dedicated to promoting information and discussion about the Himalayan watershed and the rivers that originate there.”

Just 50 metres from the Mekong, in the shadow of a discarded plastic cup, a lone chick sits camouflaged on the sand. It is a newly hatched small pratincole in Bueng Kan province, northeast Thailand.

“I recorded 15 nests on the beach, smaller numbers compared with previous years,” says Ratchaneekorn Buaroey, a member of the Bueng Kan Rak Nok conservation group, who recorded the chick in February​. “I have serious concerns about the declining of (small pratincoles and little ringed plovers) because the nesting ground is impacted by the Mekong mainstream dams.”

Small pratincoles (Glareola lactea) mate for life and, like other vulnerable birds on the Mekong, lay their eggs in the sands of the October-May dry season. But in recent years, hydropower dams have contributed to unseasonable water levels.

Ratchaneekorn and her husband, Noppadol​ Buaroey, have been monitoring the birdlife of Bueng Kan for 12 years, noting the eggs of beach-nesting birds on the banks of the Mekong. This year, Ratchaneekorn says, the waters have been so low that this area of the bank has not flooded. In contrast, in 2018 nests holding 21 bird eggs were flooded, more than half the active eggs Bueng Kan Rak Nok recorded here.

Unnatural Mekong

“These birds require several months of low water to incubate their eggs and rear their chicks. With the unseasonal water levels, the nests are unpredictably flooded,” says Ayuwat Jearwattanakanok from the Bird Conservation Society of Thailand. “The river needs to be dry during the right season and flooded during the right season. Otherwise, species that have relied on such seasonal rhythms for centuries will gradually go extinct.”

There are 12 operational mainstream Mekong dams upstream of Bueng Kan, 11 in China, and one in Laos, and more mainstream dams are in various stages of planning and development in Laos.

“Sudden releases of water from Chinese dams during the dry season have rendered the Mekong almost unrecognisable from the river it once was,” says Phil Round, regional representative of the Wetland Trust and research associate at Michigan State University Museum. “Many eggs and small, still flightless young are washed out and destroyed.”

The 2021 dry season has been unpredictable, largely driven by the maintenance and testing of China’s Jinghong dam site close to the Thai and Laos borders.

According to data from the Stimson Center, a Washington DC-based think tank, levels below the Jinghong have been spiking up and down since December, the result of hydropeaking operations. This is when, because of demand peaking during the day, the turbines are shut off overnight with water release restricted until demand spikes the next day. Brian Eyler of the Stimson Center says the Jinghong hydropower plant is responding to local energy demand in Yunnan’s Xishuangbanna prefecture.

The principal affected species along Thai stretches of the Mekong are small pratincoles, of which there may be fewer than 1,000 pairs, and river lapwings, with perhaps fewer than 100 pairs, Round says, adding that the little ringed plover and red-wattled lapwing are similarly affected.

“We actually need some properly structured studies of the impact of dams on birds so as to have a more precise idea of what is taking place,” Round says. “I am not aware that anybody is looking properly to assess the damage.”

The economic impacts of upstream dams – the salinisation of the delta or the decline of Tonle Sap’s fisheries – are having drastic consequences for people along the Mekong, but large areas of the region lack reliable bird surveying, particularly in Cambodia.

One of the rarest Mekong birds is the river tern (Sterna aurantia), which has decreased in number by 80% in Cambodia in the past 20 years, according to the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). In February, WWF announced that the Mekong population of the river tern had doubled in five years despite disruptions to the river, aided by local conservation efforts. Despite this, river terns, as well as black-bellied terns, have already disappeared from the Thai and Laos stretches of the Mekong.

“There are some stretches of the lower and mid-Mekong that are not so well surveyed for birds in Cambodia’s northeast provinces and southern Lao People’s Democratic Republic, but likely of importance based on recent data,” says Dr Ding Li Yong, Flyways Coordinator for Asia at BirdLife International, adding that human encroachment has already endangered many species. “There are now very few stretches of undisturbed parts of the Mekong where these riparian birds occur in any number.”

Thailand and Cambodia are home to the Mekong’s only endemic bird species: the Mekong wagtail, which was not confirmed as a species until 2001. The Oriental Bird Club lists the Mekong wagtail’s chief threat as the construction of dams.

Data and the Golden Triangle

The Golden Triangle at Chiang Saen, where Thailand’s border meets with Myanmar and Laos, sits downstream of 11 of China’s hydropower dams on the Lancang (China’s section of the Mekong). The area is also upstream of the Thai-built Xayaburi dam. In northern Laos there are plans for dams at Pak Beng, Pak Lay, Luang Prabang, Sanakham, and Pak Chom – all with varying levels of Chinese involvement in development and construction.

Mekong unseasonal water levels endanger nesting birds in Thailand | News by Thaiger

“The stretch between Chiang Saen and Chiang Khong, in particular, has changed drastically. The water level is unnaturally high during the dry season, reducing the exposed sandbars which used to be filled with small pratincoles and other birds,” says Ayuwat.

For Thailand’s conservationists, Chiang Saen’s section of the river has long been a point of contention with China, exacerbated by long-term plans to blast stretches of the river to increase navigability.

Chiang Saen is also the location of the Mekong’s uppermost near-real-time monitoring station outside of China, the vanguard for determining the water levels from China’s upstream dams. The Stimson Center’s Mekong Dam Monitor uses a combination of satellite data, and water and weather monitoring.

Prediction of little value

“The Mekong Dam Monitor is capable of issuing alerts for sudden releases or restrictions from the Jinghong dam 48 hours prior to the effects of those releases or restrictions hitting Chiang Saen and Chiang Khong,” says Brian Eyler.

Combined with China’s Lancang-Mekong data portal, predictions for sudden rises or falls downstream are accurate within a few centimetres. However, prediction is so far of little value to bird conservationists.

“[Predictive data] wouldn’t be helpful if we can’t negotiate with those who are in control of the water flow. The key to reducing environmental impacts on both birds and other animals is to let the Mekong river run naturally,” says Ayuwat. Birds like the small pratincole lay eggs that hatch in around two to three weeks and remain flightless for weeks after, so any water on the banks during that time will destroy the nests.

Birdwatchers congregate in Chiang Saen at Nong Bong Kai Non-Hunting Area in the winter months to see harriers roost. Eight kilometres away stands the gaudy Kings Romans Casino in Laos, a monument to Chinese financial and cultural influence in the country. Dams financed by China face little resistance in Laos, and Thailand and other riparian countries contend via the Mekong River Commission (MRC), an entirely advisory body.

“The government should create platforms for downstream civil societies to participate or negotiate with China,” says Teerapong Pomun, director of the Mekong Community Institute (MCI) and Living River Siam Association (LRSA). “We cannot let just the government or MRC do it because they have limitations and agendas. Civil society is an important factor to balance the power and fill the gaps.”

One of the most pressing dams for Thai conservationists is Sanakham in Laos, just two kilometres from the border with Thailand. Laos plans to sell the power generated to Thailand, so the Kingdom finds itself in an uncommon position of being able to stop its construction by refusing to sign a power purchase agreement.

Two hundred kilometres away from where the Sanakham dam is planned, Ratchaneekorn and Noppadol Buaroey count little ringed plovers and small pratincoles by marking their nests and noting their eggs. “I have been monitoring the Mekong’s birds for 12 years,” says Ratchaneekorn. “And I’ll continue to work to raise awareness of the ecological impacts from the Mekong mainstream hydropower dams.”

 

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