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72% think the Thai government are “stalling”, 60% say leave the Monarchy alone

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72% think the Thai government are “stalling”, 60% say leave the Monarchy alone | The Thaiger
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72.4% of people polled in a recent Suan Dusit Poll say that the government should “immediately seek negotiations with the protesters and not to buy time.” The private survey was conducted by the Suan Dusit Rajabhat University. The poll was conducted between October 19 – 22 in the wake of the central city rallies, the hosing down of the protesters at Pathumwan intersection and imposing of a State of Emergency.

5,738 people were surveyed around Thailand about the ongoing political impasse, the demands of the protesters and the response from the Thai government.

Why have the numbers of political rallies have increased?

(Respondents were allowed to give more than one answer, percentages rounded off to the nearest .1 of a percent)

• The protesters are not satisfied with the prime minister’s handling of the country’s administration (66.2%)

• They protesters want democracy and an end to dictatorial power (49.9%)

• The two sides in conflict are fighting for political power (48.4%)

• The people want to see quick amendment to the constitution (47.1%)

• The government has performed poorly (44.2%)

What do you want to tell the government in the wake of political protests?

• The government should immediately seek negotiations with the protesters and not to buy time (72.4%)

• It should not use violence with the protesters (61.7%)

• It should listen to the voice of the people and the protesters (60.4%)

• The protests are in line with democratic principles (57.4%)

• The protesters are exercising their rights and freedom (53.1%)

At the same time, 73% of respondents wanted the protesters not to become a tool of any political groups and 66% were concerned that the protesters be careful about Covid-19. 64% hoped the protesters would not resort to violence. 60.4% of respondents said they didn’t want protesters to “infringe on the Monarchy”.

Amongst the protesters list of 10 key demands, questioning the role of the Thai monarchy is the most controversial and shaping up to become the most polarising issue as the impasse continues.

How would you end the political rallies?

• the two sides must not use violence 61.4%

• the government must show sincerity in solving the protesters’ problems 57.9%

• both sides should seek truce via negotiations 56.6%;

• the two sides must listen to one another’s opinions 49.6%

• the two sides must be flexible and take a step backward 44.1%

2 more protests have already been scheduled in central Bangkok, 1 today and the other tomorrow. A joint sitting of the Thai Parliament is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday this week.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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14 Comments

14 Comments

  1. Avatar

    J. Wheeler

    October 25, 2020 at 1:31 pm

    A request for information regarding Suan Dusit and Nida polls.
    In a past life, I was involved in public opinion studies, I’ve looked numerous places trying to find the methodology used by these polls. Is it telephone interviews, internet interviews or in-person. How is the initial sample chosen: Is it random sampling, is a list used, or do people respond online? How do people qualify to participate? What is the sample size?
    Without knowing this information I am not comfortable accepting the results of these surveys.
    Is there a place I can go on the internet to have my questions answered.

    I’m not suggesting there are problems with these polls and their methodologies–I just cannot judge based on the lack of detail provided.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 25, 2020 at 2:52 pm

      Randomly selected direct telephone interviews, with between 1,500 and 5,000 usually polled, so all those polled are positively identified and on record.

      Hardly condusive to an accurate poll anywhere when giving the “wrong” answer could land those polled in jail.

      • Avatar

        preesy chepuce

        October 25, 2020 at 10:06 pm

        Most wise businesses conduct private but accurate polling to try and get the truth about why their brand isn’t performing in the marketplace as well as would be liked. This does not appear to be an approach that the CCP took in HK, and the consequences seem likely to be economic decline of HK as a “cost of doing business”, mainly because if HK is compromised by a political entity, it can’t be relied upon to make business decisions for business reasons, the same applies to Huawei. Although every situation is unique, there are trends, patterns, and tendencies across situations that should be acknowledged. There is always a pragmatic, practicable, non-polarising solution available if both sides trust each other to keep their word in any agreements formed. Let’s hope for a good faith negotiation.

    • Avatar

      James Cooks

      October 25, 2020 at 9:45 pm

      Agree

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 26, 2020 at 3:36 am

      Also bear in mind that what a poll is reported as saying, particularly in an attention-grabbing headline, may well be very different from what the poll actually says and the question actually asked.

  2. Avatar

    Issan John

    October 25, 2020 at 1:51 pm

    Sorry, Thaiger, but according to the poll 60% did NOT say “leave the monarchy alone” – your headline is very misleading.

    That is NOT what they said.

    What those polled were asked, according to you and your source the Bangkok Post, was if they “… want the protesters to avoid infringing on the monarchy (60.41%)”.

    So 60% said they want THE PROTESTERS to leave the monarchy alone.

    That’s far from the same thing as “wanting the monarchy left alone”.

    Many of those 60% (it’s impossible to say how many) may “want the monarchy left alone” BY THE PROTESTERS because they want the protesters to concentrate on Prayut and the government, and they see the monarchy as a separate issue which detracts from that.

    As Suan Dusit polls are not taken anonymously and those polled can be positively identified, many of that 60% may also have been unwilling to identify themselves as breaking the law and potentially face up to 15 years in jail for lese majeste; that 40% were willing to do so may be a surprise to some.

    • Avatar

      Toby Andrews

      October 27, 2020 at 6:19 pm

      It seems to me it is perfectly obvious that the headline Leave the Monarchy alone, was referring to the protesters. Who else?
      And avoid infringing, is leave the monarchy alone, but not as direct.
      Hardly worth objecting to . . .
      Beside this is a headline. Headlines are often shortened to attract attention.
      Your post is just pointless nit picking.

  3. Avatar

    EdwardV

    October 26, 2020 at 8:28 am

    If you assume the poll is accurate, it’s saying a lot and a little at the same time. That 72% thinks the government is stalling doesn’t mean much since a blind man can see that. At the same time that 60% want the monarchy left alone says a lot considering it’s one of the main points of the protesters. Question is does that keep the protesters from reaching critical mass with their current model?

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      October 26, 2020 at 9:30 am

      “At the same time that 60% want the monarchy left alone says a lot considering it’s one of the main points of the protesters”

      60% DIDN’T say they “want the monarchy left alone” – that wasn’t the question asked.

      What they actually said if you read the article and either the source or the poll in detail is that they think THE PROTESTERS should leave the monarchy alone, which is very different.

      It may be that 60% “want the monarchy left alone”, or it may be that 60% “want the protesters to leave the monarchy alone” because they think the protesters should be concentrating on Prayut and a revised electoral system and constitution, with any changes to the monarchy as a separate issue.

      It’s impossible to tell, as the poll phrased the question so badly.

      • Avatar

        EdwardV

        October 26, 2020 at 9:53 am

        A distinction without a difference. The point you make, which by your own admission isn’t know either way, doesn’t invalidate or answer my question. I was genuinely interested before, now not so much. Oh well …

        • Avatar

          Issan John

          October 26, 2020 at 10:57 am

          That’s the problem – the poll doesn’t answer your question, it just confuses it.

          Similarly, does it mean that 40% DON’T “want the monarchy left alone” even though they could be breaking the law by saying so?

          Who knows?

          • Avatar

            EdwardV

            October 26, 2020 at 12:02 pm

            I wasn’t asking for someone to state fact, but opinion. There are some here who are much more knowledgeable about the facts on the ground than me reading about it. If 60% disapprove of the protesters wanting to change the monarchy, will that hinder their support of the protesters? After all it’s not like it’s a minor point in their demands. Like I said … oh well.

  4. Avatar

    Issan John

    October 26, 2020 at 5:03 pm

    Edward, I agree with you! In my view it was a very badly phrased question, ambiguous, and inviting misinterpretation.

    Deliberately so? Who knows?!

  5. Avatar

    Richard

    October 27, 2020 at 9:33 am

    The same pollsters used in Thailand that says crazy Joe is winning

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