Connect with us

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

South Australia heads into major lockdown to control Covid cluster

The Thaiger

Published 

 on 

South Australia heads into major lockdown to control Covid cluster | The Thaiger
PHOTO: A Kangaroo decides to enjoy the quiet streets of Adelaide
  • follow us in feedly

The Australian state of Victoria, with its capital Melbourne, locked down for nearly 3 months, eventually cutting new cases down to zero. Now the next-door state of South Australia, with its capital Adelaide, has begun one of the world’s toughest lockdowns. Even outdoor exercise, dog-walking and basic errands are banned. The state of 1.7 million will now aim to contain the cluster of Covid-19 infections. South Australia is 5 times the land mass of the UK.

Travellers described the situation as “crazy” and “incredible” as there were scenes of banked-up traffic between Adelaide and Broken Hill last night night as South Australians, or out-of-state travellers, raced to get into New South Wales before midnight. Roads to Victoria were also packed as of late yesterday afternoon.

Australia’s leaders are showing little patience with any outbreaks and have shown resolve to lockdown cities or entire state to contain the country’s Covid-19 cases. Nationally, Australia has had a total of 27,777 cases since the start of the pandemic. Just yesterday the US reported 173,632 new cases and an additional 1,956 deaths from Covid-19. The UK reported 19,609 new cases yesterday.

For the next 6 days…

• Mask-wearing is mandatory

• Only one person from a household will be allowed to leave home each day (only for essential reasons)

• Schools, universities, cafes and restaurants are closed

• Weddings and funerals are banned

23 people in Adelaide have become infected after a cleaner at a quarantine hotel for arriving from overseas, became exposed to the virus. The state’s health authorities maintain the “circuit breaker” measures are necessary “to avoid a wider outbreak”.

South Australia heads into major lockdown to control Covid cluster | News by The Thaiger

Speaking to the media, the State Premier Steven Marshall commented that “the strain of the virus that is circulating is nasty with all of those infected mostly asymptomatic”.

“It was highly likely to be transmitted from surfaces and that the incubation period was as low as 24 hours. It’s a real worry, especially because people who become infected are not showing the typical symptoms that we are used to.”

The local cluster, and the more severe outbreak in neighbouring Victoria, indicates the federal and state governments will maintain ongoing vigilance to control the virus. Australia has mostly been spared the scale of infections and deaths experienced in the US, Europe and South America.

“Victoria is proof that hard lockdowns do work. The state, which saw a daily peak of around 700 infections in August, has now gone 20 days without new cases.”

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Bob

    November 19, 2020 at 12:09 pm

    The lockdown only hurts the economy and does nothing to save lives. Covid is real and very treatable and not very deadly. Losing your job, home and family is the result of this insane lockdown.

    • Avatar

      David Barker

      November 20, 2020 at 1:58 am

      Australia should keep its borders shut forever.Once opened someone will bring something in.
      What a country

  2. Avatar

    Ameila Leary

    November 19, 2020 at 12:48 pm

    Australian authorities are demonstrating their country’s well-assorted preparation to deal with coronavirus infections and assist people with the least number of infections in their country. Where the other nations are rushing for their economies and caring about their people least, Australia reveals how much they care for their well-being’s and also seeks ways to boost their economy.

    • Avatar

      Thomas Gotschalk

      November 19, 2020 at 1:12 pm

      Hahaha… Great sarcasm. Premium trolling.:-)

    • Avatar

      Andrew

      November 19, 2020 at 1:21 pm

      Even dead bodies will have to rot for at least a week longer and ‘guests’ at Pepper’s hotel will stay there for 4 weeks, the first and longest quarantine in the world. Just crazy.

  3. Avatar

    Matk

    November 19, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    Well i can tell you as a South Australian here that this outbreak started from an Australian returning from the UK and being quarrantined in a city hotel.
    People here are angry and furious that this has happened after so many govt claims that all will be ok. Next door in Victoria the state was locked down for 3 months because the same thing happened. Massive damage to the economy and peoples income and mental health. Its a huge country and returning Australians need to be quarrantined well away from other people and not in city hotels.

  4. Avatar

    Andrew

    November 19, 2020 at 4:26 pm

    Even dead bodies will have to rot for at least a week longer and ‘guests’ at Peppers hotel will stay there for 4 weeks, the first and longest quarantine in the world. Just crazy.

  5. Avatar

    Don R

    November 19, 2020 at 8:56 pm

    And they’ll be back on lockdown again and again and again and again because… covid is here to stay! Experts told us this in February. Nothing you could do now will eradicate it, so time to put on the big boy pants and accept the small risk.

    More people are dying from the response than the virus, and in a few years it won’t even be close.
    It’ll easily be 10 deaths for every 1 covid death. In other words, if you push covid hysteria, you’re responsible for killing people. That’s berry berry sad.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



Find more SE Asian News courtesy of The Thaiger.

Broke? Find employment in Southeast Asia with JobCute Thailand. Rich? Invest in real estate across Asia with FazWaz Property Group. Even book medical procedures worldwide with MyMediTravel, all powered by DB Ventures.

If you have story ideas, a restaurant to review, an event to cover or an issue to discuss, contact The Thaiger editorial staff.

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

19 new Covid-19 cases detected in quarantine

Caitlin Ashworth

Published

on

19 new Covid-19 cases detected in quarantine | The Thaiger

19 new Covid-19 cases were detected in quarantine, according to the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration. Thailand’s total number of confirmed Covid-19 cases is raised to 3,961 with 3,790 recoveries and 60 deaths. 111 people are currently receiving medical treatment for the coronavirus.

  • 4 Thai nationals travelling from Saudi Arabia, including a 40 year old teacher and 3 students ages 5, 10 and 12, tested positive for Covid-19.
  • 3 people travelling from the United States, including a 61 year old American and 2 Thais, ages 30 and 75, tested positive for Covid-19.
  • 2 Indian nationals, ages 32 and 40, travelling from India tested positive for Covid-19.
  • 2 Thai nationals, ages 26 and 52, travelling from Germany tested positive for Covid-19.
  • 2 Thai nationals, ages 30 and 37, travelling from the Republic of Georgia tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 27 year old Thai national travelling from the United Kingdom tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 30 year old Thai national travelling from Luxembourg tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 31 year old Thai national travelling from Sweden tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 42 year old Italian national travelling from Italy tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 69 year old Omani national travelling from Oman tested positive for Covid-19.
  • A 41 year old Thai national travelling from Poland tested positive for Covid-19.

19 new Covid-19 cases detected in quarantine | News by The Thaiger

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Questions raised over AstraZeneca “dosing mistake” in vaccine trials

The Thaiger

Published

on

Questions raised over AstraZeneca “dosing mistake” in vaccine trials | The Thaiger

British-Swedish pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced this week that their experimental coronavirus vaccine candidate is, on average, 70% effective. But since Monday’s announcement vaccine experts from around the world have questioned the methodology of the trials and transparency of the announced Phase 3 trial results.

The questions and uncertainty of the AstraZeneca vaccine trials will set back the timing for the vaccine to be authorised other parts of the world. Scientists are curious why the company has pooled results from different trials, saying that this “deviates from standard reporting on clinical trials”.

AstraZeneca announced last Monday that the participants in the UK had been given 2 different courses of the candidate vaccine.

The drugmaker, who co-developed the vaccine with the University of Oxford, didn’t explain why they used 2 different dosing regimens, or why the size of one group was significantly smaller than the other.

• In one group, 2,741 participants received a half-dose of the vaccine followed by a full dose at least 30 days later. This group was 90% protected against Covid-19.

• In the second group, 8,895 participants received a full dose followed by another full dose a month later. This group was only 62% protected.

The 2 trials, when averaged, according to AstraZeneca, gives their vaccine its reported 70% effectiveness. But epidemiologists say that the small number of people in the low dose group make it difficult to know if the effectiveness “was a statistical quirk”.

David Salisbury, from the global health program at London-based Chatham House, said another area of confusion was that the studies pooled results from the two groups to reach an average of 70% efficacy. Speaking to AP…

“You’ve taken two studies for which different doses were used and come up with a composite that doesn’t represent either of the doses. I think many people are having trouble with that.″

Then, Mene Pangalos, head of biopharmaceuticals research and development at AstraZeneca, responded to Reuters saying that a “lab error” was the reason why some volunteers had received a smaller dose… the dose that proved to be 90% effective.

“The reason we had the half dose is serendipity, Researchers had underpredicted the dose of the vaccine by half.”

Then, the next day, University of Oxford chimed in in a statement… “dose selection for any new vaccine is a complicated area, and in exploring methods of dose selection, we discovered one gave a lower dose than expected.”

“A difference in the manufacturing process had led to the error.”

AstraZeneca say that these “manufacturing problems” have been corrected, noting that the UK regulator overseeing the trial had agreed to include “both approaches” in Phase 3.

Speaking to the Wall Street Journal on Wednesday, Menelas Pangalos said that the mistake is actually irrelevant.

“Whichever way you cut the data, even if you only believe the full-dose, full-dose data, we still have efficacy that meets the thresholds for approval with a vaccine that’s over 60% effective.”

The trial’s lead investigator at Oxford University, Professor Andrew Pollard, as part of the announcements on Monday, said that’s the issue is likely to do with the delicate balance of dosing someone just enough to trigger an immune response against the disease.

“What we’ve always tried to do with a vaccine is fool the immune system into thinking that there’s a dangerous infection there that it needs to respond to, but doing it in a very safe way.”

“So, it may be that the best way of kicking the immune system into action could be to give the body a small amount of the vaccine to begin with, and then follow up with a larger amount.”

Responding to whether he had genuine confidence that the half-dose group’s 90% success was not just a feature of a small sample size, Pollard said that result was “highly significant…even with the numbers that we have.”

Moncef Slaoui, a US-based researcher and former head of GlaxoSmithKline’s vaccines department who leads the US coronavirus vaccine program, says they were reviewing AstraZeneca’s vaccine data.

He noted that group that got the lower dose that yielded the 90% efficacy had been a younger group, with no one older than 55.

“That could potentially affect the strength of AstraZeneca’s findings, given that young people typically produce stronger immune responses to vaccines. We want it to be based on data and science.”

Natalie Dean, assistant professor of biostatistics at the University of Florida said that the AstraZeneca/Oxford University team “get a poor grade for transparency and rigour when it comes to the vaccine trial results”.

“This is not like Pfizer or Moderna where we had the protocols in advance and a pre-specified primary analysis was reported.”

AstraZeneca shares have fallen 12% since November 11.

SOURCE: Euro News | Reuters | CNN

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Thai government to sign vaccine contract with Oxford University, AstraZeneca, today

Maya Taylor

Published

on

Thai government to sign vaccine contract with Oxford University, AstraZeneca, today | The Thaiger
PHOTO: www.aseanthai.net

The Thai PM, Prayut Chan-o-cha, has confirmed that Thailand will today sign a contract with Oxford University and pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, for the procurement of their Covid-19 vaccine. The PM says the agreement will mean Thais can access the vaccine once it goes into production. This contract is in addition to the agreement signed for the transfer of vaccine technology that will enable it to be manufactured here.

Earlier this week, the team behind the vaccine announced that it was between 70-90% effective, depending on the dosage. The discrepancy raised some questions, as it appeared the vaccine was more effective when administered first as a half-dose, followed by a full dose, rather than when 2 full doses were administered. The team now says it may carry out another global trial to determine why the lower dose appears more effective.

The PM points out that one significant advantage the vaccine has is that it can be stored at temperatures of 2 – 8 degrees Celsius, unlike those of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, which need to be stored at much lower freezer temperatures (around -70 degrees Celsius, in the case of the Pfizer jab). Such a requirement could create a logistical nightmare for some countries.

The PM says the vaccine is likely to be approved and go into production in Thailand by the middle of 2021, adding that the quicker it’s available, the quicker the tourism sector and the overall economy will recover.

According to a Thai PBS World report, the PM says many other countries have signed similar deals with pharmaceutical companies, in order to guarantee access to effective vaccines for their citizens. Meanwhile, he adds that, until the vaccine is available, people should continue with hygiene measures such as mask-wearing in public spaces, hand-washing and social distancing, in order to avoid the repeat waves of the virus that other countries are having to deal with.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading
Thailand News Today | Army deny Twitter spin, “Don’t Reopen”, English proficiency low | Nov 27 | The Thaiger
Thailand6 hours ago

Thailand News Today | Army deny Twitter spin, “Don’t Reopen”, English proficiency low | Nov 27

Thailand News Today | Shots fired, the yellow ducks, “no coup” promise | November 26 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 day ago

Thailand News Today | Shots fired, the yellow ducks, “no coup” promise | November 26

Thailand News Today | No vaccine, no flight, protest latest, smoking ban | November 25 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 days ago

Thailand News Today | No vaccine, no flight, protest latest, smoking ban | November 25

Thailand News Today | Holiday road toll, protests tomorrow, GDP recovery | November 24 | The Thaiger
Thailand3 days ago

Thailand News Today | Holiday road toll, protests tomorrow, GDP recovery | November 24

Thailand News Today | Dinosaurs in BKK, BOT tackles Baht, Special K isn’t special | November 23 | The Thaiger
Thailand4 days ago

Thailand News Today | Dinosaurs in BKK, BOT tackles Baht, Special K isn’t special | November 23

Thailand News Today | Bangkok exodus, Pattaya air pollution, Vaccine next month? | November 20 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | Bangkok exodus, Pattaya air pollution, Vaccine next month? | November 20

Thailand News Today | Protests to escalate, Domestic violence, Tourist visa exemptions? | Nov 19 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | Protests to escalate, Domestic violence, Tourist visa exemptions? | Nov 19

Thailand News Today | Emergency Decree, Protesters shot, Baht boost temporary | Nov 18 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | Emergency Decree, Protesters shot, Baht boost temporary | Nov 18

Thailand News Today | Protesters v Police, Quarantine reduction, VietJet passenger arrest | Nov 17 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | Protesters v Police, Quarantine reduction, VietJet passenger arrest | Nov 17

Thailand News Today | The RCEP reset, Hotel Talkfest, Protesters to be arrested | November 16 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | The RCEP reset, Hotel Talkfest, Protesters to be arrested | November 16

Thailand News Today | Coconut Business, Weekend protests, Pork dressed as Beef | November 13 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Coconut Business, Weekend protests, Pork dressed as Beef | November 13

Thailand News Today | More Thai Airways debt, Korean soldier, TripAdvisor warning | November 12 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | More Thai Airways debt, Korean soldier, TripAdvisor warning | November 12

Thailand News Today | PTT pays out, Revised visa requirements, Protester’s asylum | Nov 11 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | PTT pays out, Revised visa requirements, Protester’s asylum | Nov 11

Thailand News Today | Thai official positive, Head-butt latest, protest letters | November 10 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Thai official positive, Head-butt latest, protest letters | November 10

Thailand News Today | Golf STVs, Russian head-butted, protest latest | Nov 9 | The Thaiger
Thailand3 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Golf STVs, Russian head-butted, protest latest | Nov 9

Follow The Thaiger by email:

Trending