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What a difference an airport could make

The Thaiger

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Phuket’s Northern neighbour Phang Nga, and its key tourism magnet of Khao Lak, is seeing increasingly broader demand. One clear sign of the times is the new international offerings in the current pipeline including such brands as Sheraton, Holiday Inn and Avani. And a new airport to service the area as well.

Read more about the confirmed new Phang Nga airport HERE.

How is the area developing into a more mainstream offering?

“Given the distance to Phuket Airport, wholesale travel agents have been powerful in driving demand to the Khao Lak tourism market. They have been able to market the destination by providing one-stop services for guests by arranging their accommodation, transportation, and activities under single package,” says Bill Barnett from c9hotelworks.com.

Bill says that, traditionally, wholesale travel agents especially those from the European and Australian markets are key providers. However, the number of free independent travelers (FITs) booking directly to hotels and online travel agents (OTAs) has significantly grown in the past few years. Therefore, this trend is becoming key to hotels seeing a slow migration from traditional wholesalers to OTA’s and in effect, this is impacting seasonal trends with higher occupancy in low months.

“Without a doubt the biggest game changer looking forward is the plan for a 60 billion baht new international airport in Khok Kloi Phang Nga. When it materialises, the travel time to the Khao Lak tourism area will be greatly reduced to less than an hour and will in effect create a far broader mainstream tourism market.”

Read the c9hotelworks market update for Khao Lak HERE.

Source: STR and C9 Hotelworks Market Research

If you have story ideas, a restaurant to review, an event to cover or an issue to discuss, contact The Thaiger editorial staff.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. moskito

    July 30, 2018 at 2:25 pm

    is this a joke or what?
    Kokloi is just 8km away from Phuket and about 28km away from Phuket International Airport.
    To make sure the travellers reaching the destination faster may be it should be a good idea making the immigration process faster instead building airports every 50km 😀
    Actually it will safe about 20min driving time…is this worse destroying a huge piece of nature???

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Property

The rise of the mixed use retail development

The Thaiger & The Nation

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As our lifeststyles continue to change and morph along with technological and social evolution, so too our living spaces and the locations we choose to live. Behavioural changes among urbanites have led to the rise of mixed-use projects in Southeast Asian countries, according to property experts.

Christian Olofsson, shopping centre & mixed-use director of IKEA/Southeast Asia, told The Nation that the competitive environment in the retail industry precipitated the new format of incorporating non-traditional elements into a retail complex. Development of mixed-use retail properties is growing with the inclusion of residential units, entertainment revenues and healthcare facilities in a single site.

Catering to the needs of today’s consumers and staying relevant is the goal of the re-think among major players, Olofsson said. The new strategy could bring higher return on investment if the developer optimises the opportunity and is able to better meet the needs of modern consumers than are single-use developers.
The concept is less risky as it comes with a greater variety of revenue sources. It can also help average out the land costs by integrating a mix of components with different types of incomes.

Given the positives, IKEA decided to develop a mixed-use project – Mega City – next to Mega Bangna, Olofsson said.

According to a report by the Council of Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, 451 tall building are listed as under construction globally until 2025, of which a third are mixed-use projects combining hotels, residential units, offices, service apartments and retail outlets. In Southeast Asia, excluding Thailand, 16 mixed-use projects are currently under construction – eight in Malaysia, five locate in Indonesia, and one each in Singapore, Vietnam and the Philippines.

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is the world’s leading institute on the inception, design, construction and operation of tall buildings and future cities around the globe. Founded in 1969 and headquartered at Chicago’s historic Monroe Building, the council is a non-profit organisation with its Asia headquarters at Tongji University in Shanghai, a research office at Iuav University in Venice and an academic office at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. It facilitates exchanges of the latest technologies for tall buildings through publications, research, events, working groups, web platforms, and an extensive network of international representatives.

James Pitchon, head of Research and Consulting at CBRE Thailand, said it is not possible to develop a single-use project on a large site, citing the likelihood of oversupply in the local market, be it an office or residential project. Developers of large sites need a range of diversified incomes, he added.

Consumers like the convenience of having a range of facilities in one place that are easily accessible in a climate control environment. Having easy-to-reach retail outlets and a hotel in the same complex appeal to office tenants, especially for the convenience of foreign clients and visitors.

Thais are also open to the idea of staying in a condo next to where they work and play, provided it comes with privacy and exclusivity along with the convenience, Pitchon said.

A JLL research said that the growth of mixed-use projects in ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) began to take off amid infrastructure development and changes to consumer behaviours in the region. The association marked its 50th anniversary last year and the region is gearing up for greater growth and investment.

Already powerhouses in the wider region, Southeast Asia’s economies are projected to grow at an annual average of 5 per cent until 2020. The real estate industry stands to benefit as demographics and market size draw further investments, given the manufacturing and logistics advantages. The upgrade in ASEAN infrastructure, especially the advancement of high-speed rail networks, will attract development of mixed-use projects connected to the train stations, as is the case in Japan and Hong Kong, the research said.

Find more than 30,000 properties for sale in Thailand at property.thethaiger.com

SOURCE: The Nation

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Property

Buying off plan? A few things to consider.

Legacy Phuket Gazette

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Many developers offer units and condo “off-plan” for sale at an early stage of the project development, even before the first brick has been laid. The lure is usually a lower price and getting the pick of the best location in the development.

Some of us may not be familiar with the term “off-plan”. Generally speaking, buying off-plan means buying units which exist only on the drawing table, construction of the project may not even have started. Off-plan sales are offered by developers as they often need to sell their product fast by pricing units extremely low in order to achieve fast and valuable finance to proceed with constructing their development.

Purchasing an off-plan unit may have considerable advantages compared to an investment in a completed project. Early birds may benefit from a significantly reduced price, which makes such off-plan purchases extremely interesting from an investment perspective as such units may rise in value during construction, even prior to completion.

Smart payment plans, typically a minor deposit payment, followed by a 30% first installment and a high final payment upon title transfer, allow buyers to effectively secure a high-value asset for a relatively low initial capital outlay. Furthermore, purchase at an early stage of a project ensures that a buyer can choose the best located units in order to satisfy his individual requirements as well as a future buyer in regard to a resale.

Buying off-plan also offers the chance to “flip” a unit prior to title transfer by way of assignment of the buyer’s rights under his/her sale and purchase agreement, which allows investors to save on transfer fees and taxes that occur from title transfer.

Summarised, such off-plan investment may create a “win-win” situation for both buyer and seller: buyers obtain a low price for a quality product with high resale value and sellers are able to receive fast project finance.

However, in order to secure your investment, due diligence should be ALWAYS be carried out to minimise risks and to prevent you from a worst-case scenario – a total loss of your invested funds. Basically, such due diligence should be conducted by a reliable and reputable law firm, whereby appointment of additional experts, such as a surveyor, might be recommended depending on individual requirements.

The importance of such due diligence, particularly when buying off-plan, in part arises from the fact that extremely important points – such as secured access, lawful title to the project’s land, as well as an
accurate application for the required construction permit or licenses – may not have been accomplished, completed or sufficiently verified by a developer.

Additionally, the financial stability of a developer offering such off-plan sales should always be of concern. In this context, the fullest attention should be paid to the reliability and track record of the developer. A professional real estate agent, representing only well reputed developers and ideally having the financial backing of big investors, can be the first credentials to look for to separate the wheat from the chaff.

Simply put, off-plan buying can be an interesting and promising investment, but extensive market research, awareness for potential risks, comprehensive due diligence as well as consideration of generally accepted risk management is mandatory to find the right product, which seems not only to be a bargain, but also fits with your personal requirements on a safe investment.

Select from over 7,000 properties in Phuket at property.thethaiger.com

This article was written by International Law Office Patong Beach. For any questions you can contact ([email protected]) or call ILO’s office 07 6222 1915.

International Law Office

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Property

Buying property in Thailand – the basics

Legacy Phuket Gazette

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by Kevin Hodges

There are many, MANY properties for sale in Phuket and around Thailand. In a market that has peaks and troughs it’s best to buy in partnership with respected sales agents who know the current market and can help you avoid some of the common pitfalls.

Buying property in Thailand is not straight forward, so you will need sound, professional advice which acts in your best interest. It can be a confusing experience due to laws, regulations, the language barrier and the many choices.

Real estate brokers in Phuket have the largest selection of property, land and long-term rentals – they have sales teams that are both foreign and Thai and can speak a variety of languages. property.thethaiger.com has over 30,000 properties listed in Thailand, over 7,000 in Phuket alone.

With a vast array of properties available, it is important to short list to maximise the use of your time and avoid viewing unsuitable properties by narrowing down choices.

Brokers act as a liaison between the buyer and seller, and the good news is that the buyer pays no broker fee – it is paid by the seller in Thailand. Here’s how it works.

Research

Brokers will work closely with buyers to compile a focused and realistic brief, which takes into account a buyer’s requirements and preferences relating to the budget, style, condition, size and location of the property. They can advise on the different locations and options available.

Short List

A broker will preview and shortlist suitable properties – this saves a buyer valuable time as the broker will only show properties that he or she has first previewed and that meet the buyer’s requirements.

Property Tour

Brokers accompany buyers on viewings to show the shortlisted properties. Once a suitable property has been identified, they provide an objective overview so that you are equipped with the knowledge to make an informed decision.

Negotiation

When the right property is found, the broker will assist both buyer and seller in negotiating a favorable price and terms.

Payment

A reservation agreement and nonrefundable reservation deposit of usually 2 per cent to 5 per cent is placed with the broker in the client’s account. This removes the property from the market, so no one else can buy it prior to the signing of the Sale & Purchase Agreement (SPA). Upon signing the SPA, 30-50 per cent of the price is usually required with the outstanding amount to be paid upon transfer of ownership.

The buyer should, at this time, ask how the seller wishes to receive payment – inside or outside of Thailand – to avoid bringing in funds when payment is required elsewhere. If funds are required in Thailand, a TT3 form must be completed for the amount required.

Conveyancing

Once the price is agreed and the reservation deposit is put down, the broker will introduce you to a reputable lawyer who has experience in property conveyance. The lawyer will use that expertise to ensure that the process runs as smoothly and quickly as possible.

Kevin Hodges – originally printed in Phuket Gazette.

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