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Yingluck impeachment proceedings in 25 days, says NLA

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Yingluck impeachment proceedings in 25 days, says NLA
Phuket Gazette

PHUKET: National Legislative Assembly (NLA) vice-president Surachai Liengboonlertchai said yesterday the impeachment proceedings against ex-PM Yingluck Shinawatra would take no more than 25 days.

Yingluck faces impeachment proceedings for alleged failure to stop corruption in her government’s rice-pledging scheme, after NLA president Pornpetch Wichitcholchai said the case would be on the agenda for the NLA meeting on November 12.

Surachai said the proceedings would take no more than 25 days after the NLA holds its first meeting on the case on November 12.

He said at the first meeting, the assembly would schedule a date for Yingluck and the National Anti-Corruption Commission to give an opening statement and then deliberations would begin.

Both parties are entitled to submit additional evidence to the assembly if either believes the suit is incomplete.

If Yingluck is impeached, she could face a political ban of five years.

Former Pheu Thai party-list MP Weng Tojirakarn urged the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) to stop the NLA from pursuing the impeachment of Yingluck, saying the NACC had not been able to give the attorney-general proof of graft to substantiate the charge against Yingluck.

He said the Office of the Attorney-General had set up a joint panel with the NACC to find more evidence, but NACC has rushed to seek her impeachment.

“The NACC is breaking the law and this makes the public believe that Yingluck is not receiving justice. It is like an endless revenge and could provoke turmoil again,’ he warned.

Former Pheu Thai Party MP Amnuay Khlangpha urged the NLA to give justice to Yingluck, saying the assembly should not rush but make a decision carefully.

He said Yingluck should not be blamed for the losses in the rice-pledging scheme because as PM she had the duty of taking care of farmers just like PM Prayut Chan-o-cha does.

He said owners of rice warehouses must take responsibility for losses or damage incurred to rice stored in their warehouses. He urged the NLA to resolve what had caused losses to the rice-pledging scheme.

“We want to know if the damage was caused by rains or poor storage. Yingluck should not be blamed alone.’

Meanwhile, the NLA yesterday selected five members of the Constitution Drafting Committee to work on the NLA agenda.

They are Distat Hotrakitya, secretary-general of the Office of the Council of State, Kanchanaratt Leevirojana, a member of the Council of State, Taweesak Suthakavatin, chairman of the lecturers’ council of the National Institute of Development Administration, Wutisak Lapcharoensap, rector of Ramkhamhaeng University, and General Yodyuth Boonyatikarn, an economic adviser to the NC P Order.

The selection was made behind closed doors. A total of 182 NLA members were present. Each was allowed to vote for not more than five NLA members.

— Phuket Gazette Editors

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Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Doctors say Covid-19 first wave may be over, but warn against complacency

Jack Burton

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Doctors say Covid-19 first wave may be over, but warn against complacency | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Dr Anupong Sujariyakul - Thai PBS World

A spokesman for the Department of Disease Control says the “first wave” of the Covid-19 outbreak in Thailand is over after the country seeing no cases of community transmissions for 44 straight days. Dr Anupong Sujariyakul warned, however, that the kingdom must be prepared for the possibility of a second wave, as the contagion is still spreading in many parts of the world, with several countries thought to have eliminated the virus already experiencing second outbreaks.

Anupong says the Ministry of Public Health supports the government’s plan to open the country slowly and cautiously, in order to restart its struggling economy, while still keeping its guard up by strictly observing the basic rules of hygiene: wearing face masks, regular handwashing, and social distancing.

As for the warning from scientists in 32 countries to the World Health Organization that Covid-19 can be spread through airborne droplets smaller than 5 microns, Anupong says the Public Health Ministry has previously explained that the contagion can be transmitted through airborne droplets. He notes, however, that the transmissions occur in enclosed environments such as intensive care units, but not in open spaces with good ventilation and sunlight. He advised the public to not be overly concerned about an airborne contagion at this point.

“If Covid-19 could be easily transmitted through the air, like tuberculosis, then worldwide operations would not be just 11-12 million cases, but many more.”

The deputy director of the DDC warns that Thai people are becoming less concerned about the prospect of a second wave and may actually be encouraging the return of contagion. On his Facebook page, Dr Thanarak Plipat was asked if the country is ripe for a second wave. His answer was “yes” as he pointed to the behavior of many Thais “who are putting Thailand at an increased risk,” saying many stores and shops no longer insist on the wearing of masks and customers appear to be more confident about not wearing them.

“Whether the disease will return again depends on the Thai people, and I personally feel that they are not afraid of Covid-19 and want it to return.”

Thanarak added that this attitude is very dangerous, and he wants people to “come to their senses.” He cited a report by Dr Taweesilp Visanuyothin, spokesman for the Center for Covid-19 Situation Administration, saying that about 3,000 migrant workers recently reentered Thailand after the easing of lockdown restrictions, noting that some of these people could be infected and may spread the disease.

“The best protection we currently have is to wear masks and observe the other safety measures.”

The director of the General Contagious Diseases Division echoed the words of both doctors, saying the fact that Thailand has been without local infection for 44 consecutive days doesn’t mean the disease has been eradicated. He warns that it could return with a vengeance “if we lower our guard and ignore basic safety measures.”

Doctors say Covid-19 first wave may be over, but warn against complacency | News by The Thaiger

PHOTO: Dr Thanarak Plipat – Dtac blog

SOURCES: Thai PBS World | Thai PBS World

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Thai Life

UPDATE: Thai Cabinet approves civil partnership bill

The Thaiger

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UPDATE: Thai Cabinet approves civil partnership bill | The Thaiger
PHOTO: VOA News

NOTE: Yesterday, The Thaiger referred to the bill as allowing “same sex marriage”. Our headline was incorrect. We have corrected the story with updated information. We apologise for the error.

The Thai cabinet yesterday endorsed a bill allowing registration of same-sex couples, as well as legal amendments to ensure same-sex couples have the same rights and privileges as opposite-sex couples. The bill and the amendment will now be put to a vote in the Thai parliament.

The government’s deputy spokeswoman says the new Civil Partnership Bill and the amendment to the Civil and Commercial Code will “ensure fairness for people of all gender identification”. The bill defines civil partners as couples born with the same sex. Marriage registration will be available to consenting same-sex couples who are at least 17 years old. One or both must be Thai.

“The Civil Partnership Bill is a milestone for Thai society in promoting equality among people of all genders… This strengthens the families of people with sexual diversity and is appropriate for the present social circumstances.”

But the bill is already coming under heavy criticism. A “No to Civil Partnership Bill” hashtag is trending on Thai social media saying the new bill isn’t equivalent to marriage. They point out that the bill doesn’t ensure the same rights as those enjoyed by heterosexual married couples, and it doesn’t recognise engagement of same sex couples.

Minors who seek such civil partnership certification must have the consent of their parents, legal guardians or a court.

Spouses of civil partners will have the same legal rights as married husbands and wives, notably including with regard to personal and jointly-held property. Civil partners can adopt a child, or a partner can adopt an adoptive child of a spouse. When a partner dies, the survivor will have the same inheritance rights as conventional married couples under the Civil and Commercial Code. Sections of the code concerning married couples will also apply to civil partners.

Some of the key points of the Bill include…

  • Consenting same sex couples, who want to register their partnership, must be at least 17 years old and at least one must be a Thai national
  • In case the same sex couple are minors, they must have the consent of their parents, guardians or the court. After the registration of the partnership, the minors will be regarded as adults
  • Either member of the same sex partnership can act on behalf of the other, as with a heterosexual married couple.
  • A same sex couple can adopt a child
  • In case one of the partners dies, the survivor has the same rights and duties as a surviving heterosexual spouse

The Justice Ministry, which proposed the bill and the legal amendments, will monitor the effectiveness of the changes and plan other legal amendments to ensure compliance with those already enacted.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Continue Reading

Thai Life

UPDATE: Thai Cabinet approves civil partnership bill

Jack Burton

Published

on

UPDATE: Thai Cabinet approves civil partnership bill | The Thaiger
PHOTO Gay Star News

The Thai cabinet has today endorsed a bill allowing registration of same-sex couples, as well as legal amendments to ensure same-sex couples have the same rights and privileges as opposite-sex couples. The bill and the amendment will now be put to a vote in the Thai parliament.

The government’s deputy spokeswoman says the new Civil Partnership Bill and the amendment to the Civil and Commercial Code will “ensure fairness for people of all gender identification”. The bill defines civil partners as couples born with the same sex. Marriage registration will be available to consenting same-sex couples who are at least 17 years old. One or both must be Thai.

“The Civil Partnership Bill is a milestone for Thai society in promoting equality among people of all genders… This strengthens the families of people with sexual diversity and is appropriate for the present social circumstances.”

But the bill is already coming under heavy criticism. A “No to Civil Partnership Bill” hashtag is trending on Thai social media saying the new bill isn’t equivalent to marriage. They point out that the bill doesn’t ensure the same rights as those enjoyed by heterosexual married couples, and it doesn’t recognise engagement of same sex couples.

Minors who seek such civil partnership certification must have the consent of their parents, legal guardians or a court.

Spouses of civil partners will have the same legal rights as married husbands and wives, notably including with regard to personal and jointly-held property. Civil partners can adopt a child, or a partner can adopt an adoptive child of a spouse. When a partner dies, the survivor will have the same inheritance rights as conventional married couples under the Civil and Commercial Code. Sections of the code concerning married couples will also apply to civil partners.

The amended Civil and Commercial Code will prohibit a man or a woman from getting married if he or she already has a civil partner. A man or a woman can face a divorce lawsuit if he or she treats someone else as a civil partner.

Some of the key points of the Bill include…

  • Consenting same sex couples, who want to register their partnership, must be at least 17 years old and at least one must be a Thai national
  • In case the same sex couple are minors, they must have the consent of their parents, guardians or the court. After the registration of the partnership, the minors will be regarded as adults
  • Either member of the same sex partnership can act on behalf of the other, as with a heterosexual married couple.
  • A same sex couple can adopt a child
  • In case one of the partners dies, the survivor has the same rights and duties as a surviving heterosexual spouse

The Justice Ministry, which proposed the bill and the legal amendments, will monitor the effectiveness of the changes and plan other legal amendments to ensure compliance with those already enacted.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Continue Reading

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