Connect with us

Thailand

Kratom leaves to be declassified as a narcotic

Jack Burton

Published 

 on 

image
  • follow us in feedly

PHOTO: Kraken Kratom

Kratom, the controversial leaf used both medicinally and recreationally in Thailand, is to be declassified as a narcotic. Justice Minister Somsak Thapsutin says his ministry will propose new narcotics laws that will exclude kratom leaves from illegal drugs lists.

Kratom is a tropical evergreen tree in the coffee family native to Southeast Asia. It’s common in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Papua New Guinea.

“To decide which plants or chemicals are narcotics, the government used the World Health Organisation framework which defines narcotics as having four characteristics.”

According to the WHO, to be considered a narcotic, a substance must cause effects on the user’s body when they stop using it. Effects often include anxiety, paranoia and dysentery. A narcotic must offer little or no medical value, and chronic use must cause health problems such as emaciation, weakness, nervousness or lack of self control. Finally, a narcotic substance must threaten a negative impact on society.

Kratom leaves don’t have these characteristics, Thapsutin claims in The Nation.

“Those who use them can easily stop, and the leaves can be used to relieve pain, fever, dysentery and diarrhea. Also, Kratom is thirteen times as effective as morphine in killing pain, and has few disadvantages,” he claimed.

(Justice Minister Somsak Thapsutin’s claims have not been verified by a peer-reviewed medical study)

Thai researchers have already studied kratom leaves together with Japanese researchers, and have even patented two strains in Japan and in the US.

SOURCE: The Nation

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.



Read more headlines, reports & breaking news in Thailand. Or catch up on your Thailand news.

Jack Burton is an American writer, broadcaster, linguist and journalist who has lived in Asia since 1987. A native of the state of Georgia, he attended the The University of Georgia's Henry Grady School of Journalism, which hands out journalism's prestigious Peabody Awards. His works have appeared in The China Post, The South China Morning Post, The International Herald Tribune and many magazines throughout Asia and the world. He is fluent in Mandarin and has appeared on television and radio for decades in Taiwan, Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

COVID-19 update: 2 new cases found in state quarantine, no new deaths (August 6)

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

image
PHOTO: Thailand Medical News

The Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration this morning reported 2 new cases of Covid-19, both returnees from the US, bringing the national total of confirmed cases to 3,330 since the outbreak began in January. A CCSA spokeman said the new patients are a 42 year old man aged 42 and a woman, aged 62, both Thai nationals. They arrived on July 31 on the same flight as a previously confirmed case, and were quarantined in Chon Buri province. They tested positive for Covid-19 on Tuesday, but were asymptomatic. So far, 4,739 people have been repatriated from the US and 9.4% […]

Continue Reading

Coronavirus (Covid-19)

No current plans to extend list of foreigners allowed back into Thailand

The Thaiger

Published

on

image

There is no immediate plan to extend the list of foreigners being allowed to come to Thailand at the moment. Specifically still excluded are retirees with valid visas, homes and families in Thailand. The directive comes from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Since Thailand’s experience with Covid-19, it has closed its borders to tourists and visitors, stranding both Thais and foreigners who want to return to the Kingdom. It also stranded up to 500,000 foreign visitors who are unable to leave Thailand due to the border closures or simply decided to wait out the peak of the pandemic here. Many […]

Continue Reading

Central Thailand

Cabinet approves 435 million baht to control hungry elephants, monkeys

Jack Burton

Published

on

image
PHOTO: BBC

The Covid-19 crisis hasn’t just affected humans and businesses; it’s had a profound impact on Thailand’s wildlife- much of which was dependent on tourism for survival. As a result, the Cabinet on Tuesday approved a budget of 435.3 million baht to reduce the impacts of wildlife on people. The budget was requested by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. As elephant camps and “sanctuaries” in Chiang Mai and across Thailand’s North closed back in May, hundreds of elephants were forced to return to their birthplaces to avoid starvation, straining resources and local economies, which were ill-equippped to receive them. […]

Continue Reading
Follow The Thaiger by email:

Trending