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What is 5G? Everything you should know about the next-gen mobile.

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So what is 5G?

5G literally means fifth-generation wireless technology. The successor to 4G, the biggest changes include higher speeds, lower latency, and the ability to connect more devices at once. The benefits of 5G aren’t limited to its use. Qualcomm is predicting a $12.3 trillion economic boost worldwide, with 22 million new jobs thanks to both the infrastructure and technological developments required by 5G.

As of 2019, 5G is mostly relying on 4G connections, so its full capabilities are limited to test environments. But from 2020, when the standalone 5G network is deployed and enabled, the race to develop better, faster, more efficient IoT devices and processes means exponential growth and potential.

This is when we’ll start to see the impact of 5G – at work, at home, out and about. We’re already feeling the push of connected devices in and around the home, with Alexa, Siri, and Google talking to us more than some of our family members. But it’s at work that we can really start to imagine how 5G can benefit our customers, advance our products and services, and, ultimately, make us more money.

High speeds, low latency, more devices

4G speeds have been increasing all the time, but 5G promises data transfers at speeds around ten times faster than current 4G speeds. Maximum speed forecasts in ideal conditions are 20Gb/s, but for the average consumer, current maximum download speeds sit at around 100Mb/s.

There are really three different types of radio wave frequencies that 5G is using, but most telcos are using the 3.5GHz frequency band for 5G, which has produced speeds of above 490Mb/s. The highest speeds (up to 4000% faster than 4G) require new infrastructure to be built, called small cells, which are low-power base stations that will be dotted around business districts and households. These use millimeter waves (mmWaves) which are so short that they can’t go around buildings, over distances, or even around corners.

One of the most obvious benefits of 5G will be the lower latency; that’s the lag it takes for your phone to load a webpage, or for data to be sent across a network. But it’s not really going to make a huge difference on a device – this is where the ‘internet of things’ is really going to make an impression.

Current latency for a 4G network sits at around 60 milliseconds. With 5G, this is reduced to between 1-6 milliseconds. And for our AI maid Rosey, latency is again a key issue – she would need to react to external stimuli when navigating around a house (walls, people, misplaced items) and immediately respond by moving or stopping. Failure to do so could result in expensive damages that would make the cost of a robot prohibitive.

The other major improvement is the number of devices the network can handle. The standard for 5G requires that the network must support at least one million devices per square kilometer. This isn’t just for one million phones, though – by the year 2023, it’s estimated there will be 1.3 billion connections on the 5G network, ranging from phones through to fridges, cars to drones, and VR headsets that enable you to catch up with friends overseas as if you were really there.

What is 5G? Everything you should know about the next-gen mobile. | News by The ThaigerWhat is 5G? Everything you should know about the next-gen mobile. | News by The ThaigerWhat is 5G? Everything you should know about the next-gen mobile. | News by The Thaiger

When’s it coming?

According to Gartner, 7% of communication service providers have already deployed 5G. South Korea has pushed 5G out on a large scale, while major cities in the US, the UK, Switzerland, Finland, and Australia have 5G available commercially. Most of the 5G networks are currently piggybacking off the 4G hardware (known as a non-standalone connection), but in 2020, the standalone technology will start rolling out.

Gartner estimates that revenue from the 5G hardware installation will double to $4.2 billion in 2020. But all this takes time: globally, it’s not until 2024 that around 40% of people will be able to access 5G.

How will this affect the workplace?

Do you ever work from home? 70% of people globally working from home at least once a week, and over 50% working from home at least half of the week. This means that getting the technology right is more important than ever. The 2019 State of the Digital Workplace report from Igloo found that 70% of remote workers feel left out of the workplace, due to issues with not being able to access people, documents or information, and missing out on processes or policy changes.

5G is set to overhaul the way that technology functions and will make working from home feel like working in the office (without the bad coffee, freezing temperatures, and all-too-regular fire drills). Files that are on the network can be downloaded easily; meetings will feel seamless and lack the lag that often happens now; and collaboration will be straightforward and effective.

In addition to improvements in speed and efficiency, it’s via 5G that the IoT will come out of the age of sci-fi and into reality. A smart workplace could mean lighting, heating, and audio-visual preferences are enabled for each employee based on their location. Office admin tasks, from cleaning through to meeting planning, could be fully automated. Virtual meetings will improve productivity and efficiency. And this is only in an office environment – in other workplaces, like factories, the operating theatre, a busy kitchen – production and operation will be revolutionised with the automation capabilities of 5G.

Of course, automation and robots are already used extensively in the workplace, in health care, manufacturing, agriculture and food prep particularly. But the soft skills shown by the robots of yesteryear (think Rosey, C-3PO, HAL), require an extreme processing speed to respond to and “think” like their human colleagues.

While some of these technologies and capabilities already exist, slow speeds and rush-to-market performances have led to inconsistencies, data drop-outs, and a lack of thought around security.

Risks

There is a lot of talk about the risks that are associated with 5G, and they can be broadly put into two categories, cybersecurity, and health concerns.

Cybersecurity

4G technology can support about 4000 devices per square kilometer. 5G is expected to be able to support around one million devices per square kilometre using the mmWave spectrum. Data transfer is likely to be ten times faster than it is today. This obviously has implications for business security. Edge computing, where processing happens closer to the device, is amazing for speed and data usage, but it could also be a security concern when the data isn’t getting checked in a central database.

This device connectedness means more endpoints for attackers to get into a network, and once they’re in, the scope for widespread damage is as large as the network’s footprint. These devices can become a “botnet”, which hackers can use to launch Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. These issues are already high on the priority list for 5G’s rollout, with recent research from the Neustar International Security Council (NISC) revealing that 75% of security professionals are concerned about the impact of bot traffic on their organizations, while DDoS attacks once again ranked as the greatest overall concern.

It’s not just the devices that are vulnerable – the small cell antennas that need to be deployed could become physical targets, and early-phase security software may not be able to stand up to attackers.

Having said that, any new technology will need to be tested, phased in, and deployed with extreme care and caution, and security companies will be working hard on preparing for any attacks that could potentially compromise the new wave of technology.

One of those is Nuclear Cyber, security partner of LiveTiles, an organization that provides dashboards, portals and intranets for businesses with a heavy focus on AI and analytics. With the rising number of employees working from home, and the huge number of newly-connected devices when 5G really hits, how can businesses protect themselves and their customers from attacks? Kurt Mueffelmann, CEO of Nuclear Cyber, says it’s not about preventing hacks; it’s about protecting the data.

“If a device gets hacked, what is the hacker trying to gain access to? Generally, it is some level of data; whether intellectual property, sensitive information like credit cards or health, financial results, etc. The question isn’t what you do to prevent the hack. Companies need to take a more data-centric approach on how to protect the ‘crown jewels’ of key information within an organisation. It’s a different paradigm, but one that is beginning to take shape in a more aggressive manner. Security needs to be the ‘nucleus’ of the intelligent workplace!”

Health Concerns

The high frequencies required by 5G mean that the range is much lower than today’s towers, and so small cell towers will be clustered around the landscape. 5G also requires line-of-sight, so another possibility (particularly for rural areas) are extensions of existing towers to make them taller.

But some people are concerned about the number of these small cell towers, because there is a higher level of electromagnetic radiation. RadiationHealthRisks.com states that, “Within the RF Radiation portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the higher the frequency, the more dangerous it is to living organisms.”

Despite the fact that 5G electromagnetic waves are a higher frequency than 4G, the radiation that comes from these frequencies is non-ionizing (as opposed to ionizing, which is the radiation from the sun or from x-rays).

Dr Steve Novella, an assistant professor of neurology at Yale and the editor of Science-Based Medicine, states that, “With 5G the hazard is low—but non-zero—and the actual risk appears to be zero. We’ve picked up no signal in the real world.” The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency’s Dr Ken Karipidis said last year, “The only established health effect (of radiofrequency radiation) is that of rising temperature,” and cannot cause cancer.

mmWaves can be absorbed by the skin and the eyes, but only with high-intensity exposure. Regulation means that mmWave exposure must be low-intensity, so health consequences will likely be limited to prolonged exposure to those low-intensity mmWaves – and there is not enough data on this yet to make a determination.

Where to now for businesses?

For individuals, we’ll all eventually need a 5G compatible phone; Netflix will be faster and more reliable; gamers will feel the impact of streaming and subscriptions; VR headsets won’t leave us all looking like Daft Punk; and our smartwatches will cook dinner. AI in the house is overtaking Roomba – robotics start-up Aelous showed their as-yet-unnamed robot at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, and in the two years since, looks set to bring the first generation of house robot assistants to market.

But a recent Barclay study found that only 15% of businesses are thinking about how they can use 5G. So how should businesses prepare for its imminent arrival?

1. Decision-makers should start educating themselves (researching both within and outside their own industry) on how 5G is going to be used and rolled out

2. CTOs should be meeting with their tech providers and creating a timeline and blueprints for infrastructure, hardware upgrades and security systems

3. Department heads should start budgeting for 5G and its introduction – initially, there will be an increase in costs for new equipment.

But the potential for 5G in business leaves plenty of room for excitement, too, and organizations should also start thinking about how 5G could improve processes and production. The time to dream is now.

Sources

https://www.techradar.com/news/5g-how-will-businesses-benefit https://www.opensignal.com/blog/2019/06/20/5g-smartphone-users-experience-1118-mbps-average-download-speed
https://www.howtogeek.com/340002/what-is-5g-and-how-fast-will-it-be/
https://www.whistleout.com.au/MobilePhones/Guides/5g-in-australia-what-you-need-to-know
>https://www.3gpp.org/release-15 https://www.bloomberg.com/press-releases/2019-09-19/5g-network-rollouts-accelerate-as-lte-s-long-tail-extends
https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2019-08-22-gartner-forecasts-worldwide-5g-network-infrastructure
https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2019-08-22-gartner-forecasts-worldwide-5g-network-infrastructure
https://www.raconteur.net/technology/4g-vs-5g-mobile-technology https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/30/70-percent-of-people-globally-work-remotely-at-least-once-a-week-iwg-study.html
https://www.qualcomm.com/news/onq/2017/10/30/previewing-5gs-effect-health-care-industry
https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d774d7945444e33457a6333566d54/index.html https://www.verizon.com/about/news/verizon-5g-transform-remote-robotics
https://www.verizon.com/about/news/verizon-5g-transform-remote-robotics https://www.qualcomm.com/news/onq/2017/05/22/look-ahead-5gs-impact-automotive-industry
https://www.zdnet.com/article/what-is-c-v2x-and-how-it-changes-the-driving-smart-cities/
https://searchenterpriseai.techtarget.com/feature/With-ThoughtSpot-GlobalTranz-makes-AI-in-logistics-platform
https://searchenterpriseai.techtarget.com/feature/With-ThoughtSpot-GlobalTranz-makes-AI-in-logistics-platform
https://www.vodafone.com.au/red-wire/5g-future-agriculture
http://smartmachines.bluerivertechnology.com/
https://www.fastcompany.com/40464024/how-john-deeres-new-ai-lab-is-designing-farm-equipment-for-more-sustainable-future
https://www.business.att.com/learn/tech-advice/how-5g-will-enhance-the-finance-industry.html
https://www.appzen.com/newsroom/
https://www.global5g.org/verticals/5g-energy
https://www.5gsummit.com.au/content/next-generation-wireless-technology-could-affect-wide-range-industries-healthcare-financial
https://www.huawei.com/en/industry-insights/outlook/mobile-broadband/wireless-for-sustainability/cases/power-a-green-5g-era-with-huawei-5g-power
https://www.raconteur.net/technology/4g-vs-5g-mobile-technology
https://www.techradar.com/news/the-future-of-cybersecurity-in-a-5g-connected-world
https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/hack/what-experts-say-on-the-radiation-safety-of-5g-network/11143020

Why 5G requires new approaches to cybersecurity


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-49480560
https://www.howtogeek.com/423720/how-worried-should-you-be-about-the-health-risks-of-5g/
https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/hack/what-experts-say-on-the-radiation-safety-of-5g-network/11143020
https://www.saferemr.com/2017/08/5g-wireless-technology-millimeter-wave.html

‘Smart’ Ovens May Turn On and Preheat Themselves Overnight, Which Is Totally Safe

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2019/10/25/what-is-5g-technology-and-how-must-businesses-prepare-for-it/#6bd2fa591758

SOURCE: www.livetiles.nyc

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Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Mandatory sim and app used to track down movement

Anukul

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Mandatory sim and app used to track down movement | The Thaiger
PHOTO: twitter@richardbarrow

A free sim card valued at 49 baht is being provided by The National Broadcasting and Telecommunication Commission (NBTC) to every foreigner as well as Thais who had have travelled from countries that have have been designated as ‘high risk’ of Covid-19 infections. These countries include China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Italy, and Macau (as of the time of publishing). According to NBTC secretary-general Thakorn Tanthasit, the AoT Airports’ new application has more than 7,000 downloads since it went live on March 12.

“The sim card will be used together with the AoT Airports application, to help track the position of users for 14 days to verify that they remain in quarantine. The app will track the position of the phone for 14 days and will alert authorities if it leaves the designated quarantine area. After 14 days have passed, it will stop tracking and the system will delete the data immediately.”

“The NBTC has coordinated with the Immigration Bureau to ask all arrivals from high-risk countries to download this app on their phone. Those who refuse to comply will be denied access to the Kingdom, according to Section 12 of the Immigration Act.”

“As for those who had entered Thailand before March 12 and have not downloaded the app yet, the Department of Disease Control will submit their names to the NBTC so that we can notify them to download the app as soon as possible.”

“Currently we are monitoring about 1,300 Thais who have returned from South Korea and tested negative for Covid-19. However, they still have to remain in self-quarantine at home until the incubation period of 14 days has passed, and this app can tell us exactly where they are at all times.”

SOURCE: The Nation

 

 

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Air Pollution

Air purifiers to be added to the top of Bangkok buses. Really…

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PHOTO: The air-pollution-busters being installed on Bangkok bus tops - The Nation

“It is like a single dead pixel on your phone, hardly noticeable”

Air purifiers sitting on tops of buses. Apparently this is another solution for Bangkok’s air pollution problems. Sounds like the people selling the mobile bus-top air purifiers have a very convincing sales person!

But Bangkok’s Mass Transit Authority director Surachai Eamvachirasakul says the department will go ahead with plans to install the air purifiers on top of Bangkok’s public buses. The promise is that it will reduce dust pollution. The air-filtration systems which will be installed on top of some of the state-operated buses are said to be capable of sucking in polluted air and blowing out clear air behind it. The director cited several test runs of the system as “evidence”.

“The device is capable of filtering 10,000 cubic metres of air per one trip. Scientific research indicated that an adult would breathe in an average 0.5 cubic metres per hour, so a bus would be able to provide clear air to more than 20,000 people on the road.”

This fuzzy maths shows an appalling ignorance of the larger pollution problem, most of which comes from plantation fires to the north of the capital – little to do with any local city contributions.

Even Chulalongkorn University biologist Jessada Denduangboripant says the plan “will have a near-zero impact on the PM2.5 dust particles”. Near zero. That’s a much closer estimate of the effectiveness of strapping air purifiers to the tops of the buses. Better still, don’t run the polluting old diesel buses in the first place which may cause more pollution per kilometre than the air purifiers could ever ‘filter’.

“If it is working as claimed, I believe it will only be capable of cleansing just a pixel of Bangkok,” Jessada said to Khaosod English.

Another scientist opined that the effectiveness of the air purifiers “would be trivial at best”, given the amount of air in the capital city against what the machines could process.

Matipon Tangmatitham, a researcher at the National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand got out his calculator.

“Based on the area of Bangkok and the height of dust particles from the ground, it gives out 1.568E+12 cubic metres of air that needed to be filtered. But the scheme would only produce 20,000 cubic meters of clean air, even when all the 500 buses are on the road.”

(And how much pollution is caused by the 500 buses cruising around the city?)

But BMTA director Surachai hit back at the scientists with a test result he gathered, which compares PM2.5 level before entering the device at 48-52 AQI with 1-5 AQI after passing through the device.

In truth, the effectiveness of the system would be almost impossible to calculate on a city-wide situation. A few extra kilometres of wind strength from the north on a day of burn-offs in the north would blow the pollution readings off the scale, completely obliterating any tiny improvements made in the immediate vicinity of the passing bus.

SOURCE: Khaosod English

Air purifiers to be added to the top of Bangkok buses. Really... | News by The ThaigerAir purifiers to be added to the top of Bangkok buses. Really... | News by The Thaiger

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Technology

From Star Trek to the Galaxy Z Flip phone – a new foldable comes to Thailand

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From Star Trek to the Galaxy Z Flip phone – a new foldable comes to Thailand | The Thaiger

The $1,500 Motorola RAZR flip phone, a sort of ‘smartphone’ version of its original 2004 market favourite, was twice the cost of an iPhone 11, looked cool but had a small battery and plastic screen. It was a throwback to the earlier design but with a foldable screen, the latest ‘thaeng’ in the smart-phone world.

Now there’s the new Galaxy Z Flip phone, a Samsung version that looks a lot more robust and has teeth to match. But before we check out Samsung’s new flipper, let’s go full retro to remember where the idea came from. And it’s a journey all the way back to US 60s TV and the fertile mind of Gene Roddenberry, the creator of Star Trek.

The ‘Communicator’ was an ever-present part of every Star Trek TV show and the flip-screen space walkie-talkie would inspire Motorola to come up with its Razr phone in 2004. The crew of the Starship Enterprise would ‘flip’ it open to get themselves out of a myriad emergency situations or a hasty request to be ‘beamed up’.

A few years ago someone even decided to make a real, working version of a Star Trek Communicator, HERE.

Motorola tried to reboot its 2004 Razr with its new ‘smartphone’ version last year but, well, it was a cute retro attempt but mostly panned by reviews and users.

But the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 6.7-inch smartphone has all the feel of a smaller, foldable Razr-style phone, but packed with the power to match. It will fold into a square about half its size, with a small rectangular display on the front cover for notifications. It comes in three colours – gold, purple and black (surely Trekkies will buy the gold) – and goes on sale on February 14 in some countries, and March 9 in Thailand.

At US$1,380, the Z Flip is hardly affordable, but with its new, sturdier design, Samsung could have mastered the flip-phone design, coupled with the power its users demand.

David McQueen, research director at tech advisory firm ABI Research, says the smartphone business has gone through years of complacency, waiting for some design innovation.

“There is little doubt that foldable smartphones are set to become the next technology innovation trend.”

“Foldable displays are set to become an important form factor in future product portfolios bringing much needed innovation into device design.”

From Star Trek to the Galaxy Z Flip phone - a new foldable comes to Thailand | News by The Thaiger

Beyond the nostalgia factor – back to 2004 and the 60s – there’s a lot of appeal in a phone that shrinks in size and shuts close. Like the Motorola RAZR, the Samsung Z Flip features a small display on the front so you can still see notifications when they come through if closed.

Unlike the RAZR’s plastic display, the Z Flip features a layer of ultra-thin glass that opens and snaps into place with ease. It packs a powerful processor and decent battery life and does most of what you’d expect from a smartphone these days.

Up to now the barrier to flip and folding phones has been the notorious hinge. Samsung seems to have solved that issue. The Z Flip features a small, internal brush-like system to push out debris and opens and snaps into place with ease. Samsung claims it can open up to 200,000 times without damage. The downside, in this design, is the noticeable crease that resides in the centre of the display, right in the middle where users are swiping and opening apps. You can see it and feel it.

It’s rumoured that Apple might be working on a foldable concept, but nothing has been announced at this stage.

But could flip phones become the next big category of hand-held devices? It’s not as if it’s a new concept. For now, that may be a leap, sideways, from the common form factor. But if executed properly, Samsung’s Z Flip’s “wow” factor will probably entice early adopters and eventually a larger audience.

Get the price tag down below 30,000 baht, and things could get very interesting.

In Thailand the phone will cost 44,900 baht and be available from March 9, according to Samsung.

From Star Trek to the Galaxy Z Flip phone - a new foldable comes to Thailand | News by The Thaiger

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