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Thais want tougher consequences for repeat drunk drivers – Dusit Poll

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Thais want tougher consequences for repeat drunk drivers – Dusit Poll | Thaiger

Thais have spoken up in a new poll saying they want tougher consequences for those who choose to drink and drive again and again. The Suan Dusit Rajabhat University Poll revealed that an overwhelming majority of Thais are in favor of harsher penalties. The survey was conducted on 2,152 participants of all ages and career levels nationwide.

About 94% of respondents favored tougher laws on drunk drivers who continue to break the law.

The poll also indicated that about 87% of respondents believe such repeat offenders should be put in prison without the possiblity of being let out on probation. Over half of the respondents have seen drunk – driving accidents, putting fire on the well – known claims that Thailand has some of the most dangerous roads in the world.

The Justice Ministry’s Department of Probation records reveal that 17,584 drunk drivers were placed on court – ordered probation in April 2019. But just 1 year later, that number dropped to 550, as the Covid-19 pandemic spurred a nationwide Emergency Decree that included a night – time curfew, bans on alcohol distribution and consumption, and closures of entertainment venues.

Campaigns that aim to educate Thai residents on the dangers of drinking and driving include the push for roadside breathalisers, as experts say using such tests are key to preventing people from driving while intoxicated. But some disagree that campaigns are really doing any good as they say foreign research has revealed that the campaigns are mostly marketing ploys designed by alcoholic beverage producers to increase sales.

According to www.dangerousroads.org, Thailand ranks number 4 worldwide for the most dangerous country in which to drive. The rankings were conducted by gathering traffic-related death rates, which show the annual number of road fatalities per capita per year and per vehicle – in kilometres in countries. The rest of the rankings are as follows:

1. Eritrea – 48.4 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants
2. Dominican Republic – 41.7
3. Libya – 40.5
4. Thailand – 38.1
5. Venezuela – 37.2
6. Nigeria – 33.7
7. South Africa – 31.9
8. Iraq – 31.5
9. Guinea-Bissau – 31.2
10. Oman – 30.4

SOURCE: Chiang Rai Times

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Steve

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 1:13 pm

    tougher consequences for those who choose to drink and drive again and again. The consequeces should be same as Europe. First time = consequeces. Not after half a dozen time ffs.

  2. Avatar

    toby andrews

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 1:26 pm

    Yes they have to increase the penalties from a B1000 to the officers arresting, to public flogging followed by castration.
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    Of the police who took the bribes.

  3. Avatar

    Issan John

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 2:54 pm

    “Tougher”? 😂

    They could hardly be weaker. 😡

    A few months ago a guy I know from a village a few kms up the hill had been drinking heavily, hopped in his father’s pick up with a friend and drove straight into a tree a few hundred metres away, killing his friend and breaking his own leg.

    Police action? Zero, nil, none. Not because anyone was paid off, police or family, but just no action.

    Police / village “checkpoints” over new year, Songkran, etc, frequently stop drunk drivers who can barely stand up – some can’t. Action? Anything from keeping the bike or car until someone relatively sober (preferably with a licence) can drive it home, to, at worst, keeping it for a few days.

    Nothing else.

    It’s not even down to corruption or stupidity – the guy I mentioned I know was top in his class 25 years ago, a graduate and ex-monk.

    It’s just “the way it is” and will stay, like setting “wildfires”, until the kids are taught otherwise.

  4. Avatar

    Yan

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 7:52 pm

    Many times the controlling “Police Officers” are more drunk than the drunken drivers…And the “Police Officers” are resulting under the “RTP”…How is this possible???

  5. Avatar

    sam

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 8:45 pm

    Certified crash helmets must be compulsory,not plastic helmets that most motorcyclists wear.A mandatory 6 months or more ban for drunk riding or driving,depending on the severity of the accident.The recent increased speed limits will not work smoothly,as most do not abide by the traffic laws and the police has a tendency to be lenient to first time violators.For decades,new rules and regulations had been introduced,but enforcing the laws had not been effectively carried out.That was why high road carnage occurred in the New Year and Songkran periods,not forgetting the daily deadly accidents that happen in the country.

  6. Avatar

    James R

    Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 11:04 pm

    In Phuket it costs 20,000 baht to pay off the police if you are over the limit at a police breathalyser check point. They will even give you a lift to an ATM out of sight. I am not joking.

    I am not agreeing with it but just mentioning a fact.

    A few years ago I was at a restaurant with Thai friends. A car backed into the friends car which was parked in a designated space.

    The police were called but nothing done as the driver of the car which ceased was a policeman.

  7. Avatar

    Ben

    Sunday, March 21, 2021 at 7:39 am

    The absence of any consequences for drunk driving coupled with corruption = a lot of road kill. Unfortunately this collateral damage isn’t going away anytime soon.

  8. Avatar

    Ian Dann

    Sunday, March 21, 2021 at 7:45 am

    I was planning on going to Eritrea this year for my hols but not now I see those road death stats

  9. Avatar

    Roger Bruce

    Sunday, March 21, 2021 at 10:00 am

    Yes John 100%
    it is the way it is in Thailand this will never change
    without new Gov and all-new Police force who care about their people first
    Things will never change….. too many cars too few police who even care
    Good Luck Thailand

  10. Avatar

    Issan John

    Sunday, March 21, 2021 at 11:50 am

    “Certified crash helmets” … “mandatory ban” … “increase the penalties” … “children on bikes” … “three on a bike” … “driving tests” … etc.

    Unless people can readily afford to obey the law, they won’t / can’t do so and it’s just more “do like us” regardless of whether it’s either possible or would make the roads safer for others.

    If kids are educated that drunk driving, driving the wrong way down a one way street, cutting people up on bikes if you drive a car, not looking before pulling out, etc, etc, is stupid and injures and kills other people then they’ll change how they drive rather than copying their elders.

    If they’re not, then they won’t.

  11. Avatar

    Dreqo

    Sunday, March 21, 2021 at 3:55 pm

    If you’re scared, you’ve always got the option of grabbing a one way flight home. Consider that the more likely solution, rather than whinging about Thailand not being the same nanny state from which you came.

  12. Avatar

    James R

    Monday, March 22, 2021 at 1:52 am

    Drego

    So you won’t mind then if a friend or relative in Thailand is killed in a senseless car/bike accident then?

    The driving test is a joke, I saw people being tested at a test centre, you drive around a track at ten miles an hour, the test takes about five minutes, no other cars around, a ten year old could pass the test.

    Nanny state? As an example, deaths per year on roads in the UK 1700, Thailand 24,000

  13. Avatar

    Jeff

    Monday, March 22, 2021 at 12:00 pm

    How about more serious consequences for criminals all around the world? Today’s punishment allows crime to be profitable. Crime does pay.

  14. Avatar

    Dreqo

    Tuesday, March 23, 2021 at 10:17 am

    @James R.
    All of my friends and family members understand the risks of the roads and all abstain from engaging in risky behavior on the roads. A bit of personal responsibility and common sense goes a long way, I realize they’ve removed any and all emphasis of that in the west.
    If the UK is preferable, I’d recommend packing up and heading there? It boggles the mind why anyone would move to Thailand, and then piss/moan about it needing to be more like where they came from. If it were to ever become like the UK, for example, then it would inherit all the pitfalls of the UK. Obviously there’s a reason why so individuals leave the UK for destinations like Thailand, let’s not be daft.

  15. Avatar

    James R

    Wednesday, March 24, 2021 at 2:50 am

    Dreqo

    You can not avoid the mistakes others make on the roads in Thailand.

    I agree, many people moan and complain about Thailand and still live there, perhaps they are on a small pension and so feel trapped and miserable as they can’t afford to live in their own country.

    I for instance have all my assets in England and spend six months a year in Thailand and six months in England, that seem to suit me the best as I like both countries but realise I am only allowed to be a visitor in Thailand as is the case for all farangs there.

  16. Avatar

    Ted

    Wednesday, March 24, 2021 at 1:38 pm

    @James I took the test a few years ago and totally agree, in that the test doesn’t test your driving ability, at all. For someone that has not spend a whole lot behind the wheel, might have had difficulties with the test where reverse driving were called for but how much they cared about the end result…is anyone’s guess.

    The written test, according to me, was even worse [I had to do it as well, since I had lost my driving license from back home] even though I had not studied for it and had know idea what the written rules are, so had to trust the knowledge 20 odd years of international driving had given me. And I missed only 2 questions. I mean, for example, everyone knows [in a test situation] that drunk driving is wrong and that you should not park your car in front of the entrance, to a shopping mall. What is a bit harder to know [what the Thai law book says] what the minimum distance is to park your car, from a fire hydrant or a railway track.

    Safe driving all!

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Ann Carter is an award-winning journalist from the United States with over 12 years experience in print and broadcast news. Her work has been featured in America, China and Thailand as she has worked internationally at major news stations as a writer and producer. Carter graduated from the Walter Williams Missouri School of Journalism in the USA.

Crime

UPDATED: 1.1 million baht of gold necklaces stolen in Hat Yai

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UPDATED: 1.1 million baht of gold necklaces stolen in Hat Yai | Thaiger
FILE PHOTO: Police investigate the site of a gold robbery in Hat Yai

UPDATE:

A man is now in custody for the robbery of 1.1 million baht worth of gold necklaces in Hat Yai yesterday morning. Pvt Ukrit Thongsomsri, a 24 year old naval deserter from the Songkla naval bank was identified and taken into custody at a house in tambon Khuan Lang in Hat Yai. The man allegedly confessed and showed police where he had buried a bag containing the necklaces. Only 10 of the 14 missing necklaces were recovered though, so police continue to search for the missing 4. The car used in the robbery was also recovered as well as the camouflage trousers he threw from the car while fleeing, which were found on the side of the road. A press conference is expected to share more details.

 

ORIGINAL STORY:

An armed and masked man stole gold necklaces valued at 1.1 million baht from a Big C shopping mall in Hat Yai Saturday afternoon. Police are searching now for the suspect and his accomplice who drove a getaway car. The robbery took place at the Yaowarat Bangkok gold shop around 3:30 pm on the upper level of the Khlong Hae branch of the international supermarket chain Big C.

Early police reports indicate that the 2 men involved in the robbery arrive in a bronze-coloured Toyota Vios with the license plates removed. They parked at the mall entrance and one man entered Big C and went to the gold shop. At the time three women and a man were on shift at the gold shop.

The thief pretended to be a customer and requested to look at expensive gold necklaces. The staff opened the case to show him several necklaces when the man lunged across the counter and grabbed a handful of necklaces while pulling out a gun and threatening to shoot the staff members. The necklaces he grabbed were about 682 grammes of gold, worth about 1.1 million baht.

After snatching the gold, the man fled from Big C and jumped into the waiting getaway car. Security guards had attempted to stop the man as he raced out of the mall but the thief aimed his gun at them and threatened them. Songkla Police are reviewing security camera footage now to try to identify the thieves. The video showed the man dressed in camouflage trousers and a camouflage hat, a black jacket, dark glasses and a face mask. No further details have been released yet.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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Crime

Burmese prisoners granted amnesty on first day of Myanmar’s New Year

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Burmese prisoners granted amnesty on first day of Myanmar’s New Year | Thaiger

Over 23,000 Burmese prisoners and student political activists are enjoying freedom after being released yesterday in an amnesty on the first day of the country’s Lunar New Year celebrations. The state-owned MRTV reported that 23,407 prisoners were released under sections of a penal code. In the Yangon region alone, over 800 prisoners were released, while Mandalay saw around 2,800 released from 5 prisons.

But, with the recent military crackdown on protesters and civilians, the law’s ambiguity may be used against those released. As the law allows for the conditional release of prisoners, that means authorities can re-arrest the prisoners without warrant at any time.

Zayyar Lwin, Paing Ye Thu and Paing Phyo Min were among the released student political activists. The 3 were arrested for writing political Thingyan poems and rhymes. They were arrested under Section 505(a) of the penal code and Section 66(d) of the Telecommunications Law, both of which are regarded by many as draconian tools to oppress dissent.

The junta-led State Administration Council also issued a statement releasing 130 foreign prisoners under the same conditions. There have been 2 other mass releases since the coup. The first was in mid-February, which rights groups feared was a move to free up space for military opponents, and the second on the eve of Armed Forces Day when the regime released around 900 detained demonstrators.

But prisons continue to fill up as more than 3,100 people, mostly anti-coup protesters have been detained. The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners has been keeping track of detainees as well as injuries and deaths allegedly at the hands of the junta. It is stil unclear, however, if those released yesterday were post-coup detainees.

Meanwhile, the Burmese military leader, Gen Min Aung Hlaing, is expected to attend an ASEAN summit in Jakarta where representatives of the bloc are expected to discuss Myanmar’s situation. Thailand’s Foreign Ministry spokesman, Tanee Sangrat, made the announcement.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

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Immigration police arrest Frenchman on drug charges, 3 other foreigners for overstay

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Immigration police arrest Frenchman on drug charges, 3 other foreigners for overstay | Thaiger

Immigration police arrested a French man who was allegedly involved in a crime network who allegedly smuggled cannabis, and arrested 3 other foreigners on overstay charges. Police say the crime network sold cannabis to foreigners living in tourist cities in Thailand.

Officers say they suspect there are more people involved in the alleged smuggling operation on the Eastern seaboard, which includes Chon Buri and Rayong. Police are now launching an investigation.

Police were tipped off earlier this year about an alleged French gang selling cannabis to tourists. Apparently, the drug suspects would rent rooms to store the cannabis and frequently change locations. Foreigners had rented a room off a soi in Bangkok, but the manager noticed they were acting suspicious. No one appeared to actually be living in the room and people would stop by the room for less than an hour, the manager told police.

Police arrested a man who was stopping by the room. Officers say the 28 year old, identified as Samy, had a suitcase filled with dried cannabis and scales. He faces charges for possession and distribution of a Category 5 narcotic.

The police went to the man’s apartment in the Charoen Nakhon area and arrested 2 French nationals, ages 27 and 28, and a 29 year old woman from the UK for overstaying their visas. Police say they had thrown cannabis and smoking equipment out the window before officers entered the room.

SOURCE: Thai Visa

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