Connect with us

National

EU maintains yellow card over Thai fishing

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Continuing systemic flaws in the protection of the rights of workers and sustainable fishing policies has kept Thailand on the European Union’s “yellow flag” watch list for illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

A source at the Agriculture and Cooperatives Ministry revealed that the EU has decided to maintain Thaialnd’s yellow flag for on IUU fishing.

Activists from the Civil Society’s Coalition for Ethical and Sustainable Seafood (CSO Coalition) said that lack of proper measures to protect the rights of workers in the fisheries sector and ensure sustainable fishing to protect species were the major reasons hindering government efforts to improve Thailand’s rank on IUU fishing – and protect its key seafood market.

The CSO Coalition also discussed the findings of two recent research studies on the situation of migrant workers in the fisheries industry and the impacts of unsustainable fishing on marine natural resources at a press conference in Bangkok yesterday. The studies found solid evidence of unsolved problems in Thailand’s fisheries sector, said CSO.

The government received kudos from Thai Sea Watch Association president Banjong Nasae for its determination to solve IUU fishing problems. They had introduced many strict measures to regulate and control Thai fishing fleets, said Banjong. However, the measures to tackle IUU fishing also contained many flaws and resulted in unsuccessful efforts to improve Thailand’s fisheries to meet EU standards, he said. “The weak point of the government’s previous IUU fishing mitigation measures was that they only prioritise the regulations for fishing vessels and ignore the policies for promoting sustainable fishing, which are also a very important matter for tackling IUU fishing,” he said.

He emphasised that Thailand’s fisheries could not be sustainable unless the government prohibits the use of destructive fishing equipment such as otter trawling and lit purse seines and issues quotas for catches.

“How can we solve IUU fishing when destructive fisheries are still openly operating?” Banjong asked.

“The government must ban environmentally harmful fishing equipment and come out with sustainable fishing policies based on a sustainable yield from our seas, in order to prevent overfishing and preserve the bounty of the marine ecosystem.

”A CSO Coalition study on the impacts of destructive fishing equipment found that the use of otter trawling and LED lights have cost an estimated 145 million baht in damages to Thailand, as these fishing methods also catch juveniles of many species, including 74 economically important fish, before they get a chance to reproduce.

Prominent migrant workers’ rights defender Suthasinee Kaewleklai said that inadequate rights protection for migrant workers in the fisheries sector had also contributed to the unsatisfactory performance in the mission to end IUU fishing.

“The results of a survey of 300 migrant workers in the fisheries industry from six provinces showed that many migrant workers still have to work in hostile condition for too long hours without proper welfare and protection of their rights,” Suthasinee said.

“We have found that many workers were being illegally taken advantage of by their employers. One in three participants in our survey said they have less than six hours rest per day, and one in five revealed that they have to work for more than 14 hours, which is a clear violation of worker protection laws.”

The government must efficiently enforce worker protection laws, she insisted, as well as encourage business owners to treat their workers justly.

STORY: The Nation

Thailand's fastest growing portal for news and information, in association with The Nation.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

National

Thailand’s household debt

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Thailand’s household debt has been on the rise over the past decade, up from an average of 116,681 baht in 2007 to 178,994 baht in 2017, but should be measured with commensurate growth in wages, inflation and the country’s GDP.

The figures show that Thailand’s debt for farming is around 16% of the total debt bill. 36% is spent on buying property and land whilst Thais only go into debt for education – around 1.6% of their total borrowings.

More disturbingly Thais are using borrowings and credit cards for keeping their lifestyles and daily costs alive. 39% of all Thai debt is for daily consumption items.

The three provinces that have the highest rate of debt are #1 Pathum Thani, #2 Krabi, #3 Nontaburi. The average debt for all Thais is 179,000 baht. Bangkok has the highest household debt at 202,000 baht per person, Yala the lowest at only 28,000 baht.

SOURCE: The Nation

Continue Reading

National

Resorts near Kaeng Krachan dam in Petchaburi temporarily closed

Kritsada Mueanhawong

Published

on

PHOTOS: The Nation

More than 30 resorts downstream of the Kaeng Krachan dam in Phetchaburi province, are being closed temporarily due to heavy flooding.

Thai PBS reports that floodwater levels at the 30 plus resorts range from 1-3 metres making it impossible to carry on with their business. It’s also been reported that spillover water from the spillway has heavily damaged the only road leading to the resorts downstream of the dam.

Officials at Kaeng Krachan dam said that the dam was discharging 259 cubic metres/second of water out of the dam into the Phetchaburi river after water level in the dam has risen to 750 million cubic metres against its full capacity of 710 million cubic metres.

One of the resort operators, Mr Thongbai Klaipetch, said that his resort and nine others in the same neighbourhood were marooned and the only road to the resorts was badly flooded.

About 60 families of Ban Tham Sua in Tambon Kaeng Krachan have made preparations to evacuate out of their village due to heavy flooding which has rendered their daily livelihood difficult.

SOURCE: Thai PBS

Continue Reading

National

Thaiger Radio News – Sunday

Kritsada Mueanhawong

Published

on

Listen to the daily news from The Thaiger, anytime, anywhere.

Continue Reading

The Thaiger Newsletter

Keep up with all the day’s news. Subscribe here.

The latest news and information from Thailand.

* indicates required

Trending