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PETA reveals ‘abused’ monkeys used to pick coconuts in Thailand

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PETA reveals ‘abused’ monkeys used to pick coconuts in Thailand | Thaiger
PHOTO: PETA

A boycott is in full swing amongst western retailers to pull Thai coconut products off their shelves following allegations that the coconuts have been picked by monkeys who were ‘abused’ to learn how to pick coconuts. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals director, Elisa Allen, claims the macaque monkeys are “snatched from the wild” and cruelly trained to climb up coconut trees and pick up to 1,000 coconuts a day.

“These curious, highly intelligent animals are denied psychological stimulation, companionship, freedom, and everything else that would make their lives worth living, all so that they can be used to gather coconuts.”

PETA says that the Thai pigtailed macaques are treated like “coconut-picking machines”. A new investigation into Thailand’s coconut industry reveals the monkeys are confined to cramped cages, chained, and forced to work. PETA reports that the monkeys are used by commercial farms that supply 2 of Thailand’s best-known coconut milk brands, Aroy-D and Chaokoh. Both brands are exported EU countries and the US.

In the UK, Waitrose, Ocado, Co-op and Boots have now announced they will stop selling some coconut products from Thailand. A spokesperson for Tesco told the BBC… “Our own-brand coconut milk and coconut water does not use monkey labour in its production and we don’t sell any of the branded products identified by PETA”.

“Following PETA’s Asia’s investigation, more than 15,000 stores will no longer purchase these brands’ products, with the majority also no longer buying any coconut products sourced from Thailand monkey labour.”

PETA has shared a video narrated by Downton Abbey star Peter Egan. According to PETA, the video shows ‘monkeys pacing and circling endlessly on chains… confined to cramped cages with no shelter from the rain… forced to climb trees and pick coconuts for milk sold by major brands’.

PETE claims it had found 8 farms in Thailand where monkeys were forced to pick coconuts for export around the world. Male monkeys can pick up to 1,000 coconuts in a day. It’s thought that a human can pick about 80.

“Other coconut-growing regions, including Brazil, Colombia and Hawaii, harvest coconuts using humane methods such as tractor-mounted hydraulic elevators, willing human tree-climbers, rope or platform systems, or ladders, or they plant dwarf coconut trees.”

The group said it has uncovered “monkey schools”, where the macaque species monkeys are trained to pick coconuts, fruit, as well as ride bikes or play basketball for the entertainment of tourists.

“The animals at these facilities, many of whom are illegally captured as babies, displayed stereotypic behaviour indicative of extreme stress.”

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10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Glenn

    Sunday, July 5, 2020 at 7:35 pm

    Ah HA! a brain fart. if one minkey can pick 1000 coconuts and 1 human can pick only 80, that’s 12.5 times the production.

    But PETA wants ethical treatment of minkeys – so, Thai govt can dictate that 12.5 out of work Thais (bartenders, bar workers, travel agencies, etc etc from CV19, ahem govt caused shut down) be hired to take the place of the overworked minkeys.

    Pay them whatever, hey, the govt can just borrow more money into existence anyways.

    Problem solved – ssshhhhh…. don’t tell anyone or A Nutty en person…

  2. Avatar

    Alex

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 12:16 am

    Good job Peta. Expose the animal cruelty and abuse! And Glenn, it’s not about production, it’s about Animal Welfare… That’s difficult to understand for someone with no empathy whatsoever, so I thought I would like to point that out to you! Still, I don’t think an individual like yourself can’t even comprehend the atrocities and the cruelty which are inflicted upon to these animals. You’re the worst example for what I call a human, that’s why people like me, refer to characters like you, as inhumane… Human/Humane, get it! Furthermore, your comment makes no sense at all, it looks manic coming from a very disturbed individual…

    • Avatar

      Negative Man

      Tuesday, July 7, 2020 at 3:24 pm

      Honestly i don’t really care
      Somehow most of them always related to political
      I still buy theirs products

      But how about use err pig to…nevermind

  3. Avatar

    Sam

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 4:04 pm

    these monkeys are not the right species. its fake news, trade wars and rich coconut competitors paying PETA donations to make fake news.. so they can steal the coconut trade

  4. Avatar

    Kim Marie

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 10:24 pm

    Thank you so much for publishing this article. I will never buy products from Aroy-D and Chaokoh again as it is immoral to enslave monkeys, period.

  5. Avatar

    LucyP

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 10:33 pm

    This is exploitation, plain and simple. I’m so glad PETA exposed this. Caring people will not buy coconut products that are obtained by monkeys’ toil.

  6. Avatar

    Michelle

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 10:43 pm

    Way to go PETA, exposing this. It’s unthinkable the places where cruelty hides sometimes. I hope all the retailers carrying these products drop them immediately.

  7. Avatar

    amy donovan

    Monday, July 6, 2020 at 11:22 pm

    Thanks,PETA!I had no idea that this type of cruelty existed. Animals should be left alone, not snatched from their natural habitats, imprisoned, abused, and put to work.

  8. Avatar

    man

    Saturday, July 11, 2020 at 11:28 am

    Ok, this might create a bit of controversy but I feel prompted to respond to this article because I think that -amongst others things- this is a clear example of cultural colonization.

    Few points:

    I’ve lived in Thailand for over 5 years now and I’ve seen part of the monkey’s coconut reality. Refering to the ‘animal abuse’, I would like to say that like anything else in this world, you can find all kind of cases from bad to good and anything in between.

    I’ve personally meet coconut monkey’s owners who had an incredibly strong bond with their animals and you could see that the owner loved his monkey so much. After all, his monkey was his enterprise, his source of income and it was treated as a spoiled pet. Of course, he still needed to keep the monkey on a chain most of the time but….don’t we also keep dogs chained?

    I’ve also seen monkey’s chained to coconut trucks in the roads of Koh Samui as they trasport the coconuts from the farm to the market, etc. However, in the same roads, I’ve also seen people driving motorbike with no helmet (often more than 2 people and babies in the motorbike) and a whole bunch of other crazy stuff.

    I think PETA is sharing a very miopic view of this reality. I wonder if they are interested in looking deeper into the situation? They would then see that these monkeys are also supporting the lives of many poor local families in rural areas in Thailand. They are feeding families! No every monkey’s owner is abusing their animal that is for sure.

    I wonder…..Would it be better to have the coconut owners or undocumented or irregular migrant workers to climb up the coconut trees? I don’t think so.

    Should we stop consuming coconut? I certainly wont.

    Being said this:

    I don’t think hurting monkeys should be allowed and there should be regulations around this industry too. However, there are so many factors involved and before pointing fingers or writing this kind of misleading and highly sensitive content, we should get a bigger perspective of the whole picture!

    • Avatar

      Just Passing

      Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 3:18 pm

      @ man: agreed, you made a couple of valid points and to some extent the points I agree with (Family livelihoods, not all farmers are animal abusers) However, this particular investigation, upon this article has made its claims, has found and presented evidence that would draw a clear inference of animal abuse, referring to the farms in question.
      A dog on a chain analogy, probably not the best choice to support your argument. (city bylaws, provincial laws etc) many cases no choice. Monkeys don’t come under the same set of laws.
      Given there are farms with good and bad manufacturing policies, selling their product to the 2 brands named. By boycotting the brands as PETA is promoting, is pressuring the Big Brands to regulate and monitor their sources… (Sweat shops+brands= Human Trafficking)

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Bitcoin sheds nearly 15% of its ‘value’ in one day

Tim Newton

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Bitcoin sheds nearly 15% of its ‘value’ in one day | Thaiger

After a meteoric, and probably unsustainable rise and rise over the past 12 months, Bitcoin has suffered a short and sharp mini-crash over the weekend, dropping nearly 15% of its value in less than an hour – a stark warning of the cryptocurrency’s unpredictable volatility.

Bitcoin dropped in ‘value’ from about US$59,000 to US$51,000 before rebounding. Ethereum and Dogecoin also suffered dramatic and sudden losses, before clawing back some of their losses.

This time last year Bitcoin was simmering around US$7,725 after bumping up and down on the spot since 2018. But last year, fuelled by fears of an over-heated US stock market, Covid volatility (whatever that is), government handouts and people-with-too-much-time-on-their-hands, Bitcoin went on a spectacular climb to peak at US$63,588 last Tuesday. But Newton’s first law (the scientist, not me) kicked into action, and with venom.

The price of a single Bitcoin hit a low of US$52,810.06 Saturday after tumbling more than US$7,000 in just one hour, before stabilising.

The drop on Saturday appears to have been triggered by a Twitter rumour that the US Treasury would crack down on money laundering schemes involving cryptocurrencies. Separately, Reuters reported a power blackout in China’s Xinjiang region, where a lot of Bitcoin ‘mining’ happens, was blamed for the steep dive.

That information came from data website CoinMarketCap.

The sudden rise of the cryptocurrencies over the past 12 months has drawn a lot of attention from governments and investors, and RobinHood-esque day trade brigade. Coinbass went public, and therefore ‘mainstream’, last Wednesday.

“All eyes are on Coinbase… as the cryptocurrency exchange prepares for its first day of trading as a public company on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol ‘COIN’.

Coinbase’s market debut is a special event for several reasons. First, it will be Nasdaq’s first major direct listing, an unusual route for companies to go public without the underwriting of an investment bank.” – USA Today

Then Dogecoin had a 500% rally – an ‘asset’ that was created as a joke 8 years ago – on April 16. 500%!!!

The fervent supports of cryptocurrencies, almost a cult, are having their moment and proving, for now, that they can have their day in the financial sun as well. With Coinbase’s successful debut on Wall Street last week, they’ve gone all suit and tie.

Last year’s sharp, and very tempting, rise in Bitcoin values has the wider financial market talking about the bubble in the cryptocurrency market – Bitcoin has more than doubled in value since the start of this year. The market will decide whether that bubble will continue to grow or do what bubbles eventually do.

At the end of 2017 the Bitcoin digital token rose in value to nearly US$20,000 before crashing to almost US$3,000 the following year.

For now, it’s all eyes on the cryptos to see which way they move. The only thing that can be guaranteed is that their valuations will remain volatile and that there will be winners and losers.

Bitcoin sheds nearly 15% of its 'value' in one day | News by Thaiger

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The Thaiger joins forces with Masii to bring you hassle-free Thailand re-entry packages and much more

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The Thaiger joins forces with Masii to bring you hassle-free Thailand re-entry packages and much more | Thaiger

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The Thiager and its sister company Tadoo, have announced they will enter a strategic partnership with the Bangkok-based fintech company, Masii.

Having joined forces with Masii, The Thaiger aims to provide its 6 million-plus monthly users with exclusive deals and packages such as the Thailand re-entry package, comprising of the Certificate of Entry (COE), Covid-19 Travel Insurance and a Covid-19 Test.

Sapir Matmon, of Tadoo, says “This tie-up will allow us to provide our readers with all-inclusive packages specifically designed to make the whole process of coming back to Thailand as simple as possible. And by booking through us, all service fees will be waived – a saving of more than 1,000 Baht. We’re confident you won’t find a better price in the market right now.”

The Thaiger joins forces with Masii to bring you hassle-free Thailand re-entry packages and much more | News by Thaiger

“We can provide everything you need to enter Thailand hassle-free and within 12 hours, which is the fastest in the market.” Says Maxwell Meyer, CEO of Masii.

Covid-19 has drastically accelerated the industry’s movement toward shifting products and services online.

Sapir says “We are tremendously pleased to welcome the Masii team and work alongside Maxwell, as one of the stars of the local fintech scene.”

Tadoo, The Thiager’s sister company, has also teamed up with Masii on their Thai price comparison platform, tadoo.co, which offers a similar range of products including, insurance, finance, internet, and mobile.

The goal of Tadoo is to bring clarity to the Thai market and assist consumers in making better-informed choices by offering a quick and convenient solution for getting the products they want without the hassle.

For more information on the Thailand Re-Entry Full Package, click HERE.

The Thaiger joins forces with Masii to bring you hassle-free Thailand re-entry packages and much more | News by Thaiger

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Aviation authority calling for 20,000 vaccine doses for crew, ground staff

Maya Taylor

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Aviation authority calling for 20,000 vaccine doses for crew, ground staff | Thaiger
PHOTO: Christian Junker on Flickr

The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand is calling for vaccine doses to protect around 20,000 airline crew and ground staff before the country re-opens to international tourists. The CAAT says it’s vital that those working in the aviation industry are protected and has submitted its request to the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration.

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Suthipong says they are seeking enough vaccine doses to protect employees of Thai-registered carriers.

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SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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