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Dengue Fever

Dengue fever rises up to 6,024 in 4 Isaan provinces

Caitlin Ashworth

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Dengue fever rises up to 6,024 in 4 Isaan provinces | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Unsplash: Егор Камелев
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Dengue fever is spreading in Northeast Thailand with more than 6,000 cases and 4 deaths in the past 8 months. The cases were reported in the Isaan provinces Khon Kaen, Kalasin, Mahasarakham and Roi Et, according to the Office of Disease Prevention.

The mosquito spread disease is also known as “bone break fever” because common symptoms include pain in muscles, bones and joints. A fever, nausea and a rash are common symptoms. Severe dengue can be life threatening, but most people recover in about a week, according to the United States Centre of Disease Control.

From January 1 to August 29, 6,024 people were reported with dengue fever in the Kaen, Kalasin, Mahasarakham and Roi Et provinces, according to the Office of Disease Control.

Doctors are advising locals to spray their homes for mosquitos, but to do it safely, warning them to make sure food and pets are out of the room before spraying. They should also cover their noses and mouths while the chemicals are in the air. Doctors say windows and doors should be closed for about 10 to 15 minutes to make sure the spraying is effective.

In June, Thailand recorded 15,385 cases of dengue fever with 11 deaths, according to the director general of the Department of Disease Control. 5,828 of those cases were children ages 5 to14.

“The rainy season, which creates puddles of water that serve as breeding grounds for mosquitos, is the main factor that is boosting the outbreak. I would like to ask people to look out for unused containers that might become breeding grounds in households.”

High numbers of dengue were reported in the Isaan region’s Nakhon Ratchasima province a few months ago. Local volunteers ramped up initiatives to prevent the further spread of the disease. They put abate sand granules, which is typically applied in ponds and lakes, were used to kill mosquito larvae. The sand granules inhibit an enzyme that is important to the normal function of the larvae’s nervous system, killing the larvae, according to the company.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Dirty Farang

    September 16, 2020 at 1:17 pm

    Lockdown! Immediately! Kick out all fragangs and close all airports now!

  2. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    September 16, 2020 at 5:59 pm

    lol
    I have had two pals who did catch it and they were extremely ill.
    One lost the use of his hand for awhile, and limped.
    He abandoned his ambition of playing center forward for Chelsea.
    A good tip to avoid mosquitoes is to stay on the fouth floor of hotels.
    Mosquitoes rarely fly above 25 feet, however sometime if the hotel has an lift they make it up to the tenth floor!
    How they press the lift button is one of natures mysteries . . .

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Caitlin Ashworth is a writer from the United States who has lived in Thailand since 2018. She graduated from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and media studies in 2016. She was a reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette In Massachusetts. She also interned at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida.

Dengue Fever

Chon Buri’s Nongprue joins fight against dengue, chikingunya viruses

Jack Burton

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Chon Buri’s Nongprue joins fight against dengue, chikingunya viruses | The Thaiger

Following the lead of Chon Buri’s Si Racha subdistrict, Pattaya’s Nongprue is rolling out its campaign to contain the spread of the chikungunya and dengue fever viruses after many cases were reported locally and hospital visits increased. Both viruses comes from bites of infected mosquitoes.

The Public Health and Environment Division of Nongprue in Banglamung are warning the public to take protective measures. Yesterday they used fogging machines to get rid of mosquito breeding areas throughout the Nongprue and Banglamung areas.

They’re also educating locals residents about the viruses and how to protect themselves. Measures include using mosquito spray and eliminating stagnant water around homes where mosquitoes often breed.

Chon Buri's Nongprue joins fight against dengue, chikingunya viruses | News by The ThaigerChon Buri's Nongprue joins fight against dengue, chikingunya viruses | News by The ThaigerChon Buri's Nongprue joins fight against dengue, chikingunya viruses | News by The Thaiger

SOURCE The Pattaya News

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Thailand

Why are Thailand’s Covid-19 numbers so low?

Jack Burton

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Why are Thailand’s Covid-19 numbers so low? | The Thaiger
PHOTO: SCMP

Why has Thailand, with a population greater than that of the UK, been largely spared the catastrophic effects of the Covid-19 pandemic sweeping the nation and much of the world? Social distancing is embedded in Thai culture – Thais rarely touch when greeting, preferring the prayer-like “wai” gesture to a handshake or embrace. Could this custom be at least partly responsible for the country’s low numbers?

There have been no overwhelmed hospitals in the country’s public hospital system. No dead bodies in the streets. No social media postings from frantic doctors or nurses. The country simply acted swiftly, and with a determined force.

Thailand was quick to adopt the use of facemasks, close schools and enforce social distancing on public transport, even before declaring a national state of emergency and curfew, sealing its borders and forbidding interprovincial travel. Is that what prevented the runaway transmission of the virus here?

Is there a genetic component that makes the immune systems of Thais (and others in the Mekong River region) more resistant to the virus? Or is it some combination of all these factors that have insulated this country of 69 million?

One thing’s for sure, despite an influx of foreign visitors early in the year from countries badly hit by the virus, especially China, Thailand has recorded just 3,236 cases since January, 58 deaths and achieved a 95.5% recovery rate. As of today, there have been no cases of local transmission for about 7 weeks (although there’s been a steady flow of daily single-figure infections as Thais repatriate from overseas).

Thailand’s low infection rate appears to be shared by other countries in the Mekong River basin. Vietnam has not recorded a single death and has logged about three months without a case of community transmission. Myanmar has confirmed 336 cases, Cambodia 166 and Laos just 19, though authorities believe the numbers are likely higher due to low testing rates in such developing nations. Yunnan, the southwestern Chinese province through which the Mekong flows, before winding its way to south east Asia, had fewer than 190 cases, with none being “active” now.

According to Dr Taweesilp Visanuyothin, spokesman for the the country’s Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration, says he doesn’t believe it’s got anything to do with immunity or genetics alone.

“It has to do with culture. Thai people do not have body contact when we greet each other. This is how the countries in the Mekong region greet each other as well. “

Thailand appears to have brought the virus well under control, but the outlook didn’t always look so positive. In January, Thailand confirmed the world’s first case of the virus outside China, in a tourist from Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the outbreak is thought to have begun. A wave of infections was set off by people arriving from Japan, Europe and the US and a Bangkok boxing match turned into into a massive virus-spreading event.

But after the lockdown was enforced in March, which shuttered businesses and schools, domestic transmissions subsided quickly. In the island of Phuket most of the island’s 17 ‘tambons’ (suburbs) were all locked down with checkpoints set up to stop people moving out of their area, except for emergencies. There were no protests, no arguments, everyone realised what needed to be done although the economic impact was considerable.

A public health expert at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, researching an outbreak of the virus in the southern border province of Pattani, noted that more than 90% of those who tested positive there were asymptomatic, a much higher proportion than normal. He claimed Thais and other people from this part of Southeast Asia are more susceptible to serious cases of dengue fever, a mosquito-borne virus, than those from other continents.

“What we are studying now is the immune system. If our immune systems against dengue are so bad, why can’t our immune system against Covid be better? “

Though Thailand’s hospitals have not been overwhelmed by Covid-19 patients, the country’s tourism-dependent economy has been battered, if not almost entirely shut down.

In April, Thailand banned virtually all incoming flights, and holidaymakers stopped coming to Bangkok, once known as the world’s most visited city. The Thai Tourism and Sports Ministry estimates that 60% of hospitality businesses could end up permanently closing by the end of this year.

The International Monetary Fund also predicts the Thai economy will shrink by at least 6.5% in 2020 with other estimates even higher. The World Bank says more than 8 million Thais may lose their jobs or income in 2020 as a result of the virus.

Why are Thailand's Covid-19 numbers so low? | News by The Thaiger

PHOTO: New York Times

SOURCE: The New York Times

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Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreak sickens nearly 6,000 Thai kids

Jack Burton

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Dengue fever outbreak sickens nearly 6,000 Thai kids | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Medical News Today

While the Covid-19 outbreak is easing in Thailand, there is growing alarm over a nationwide outbreak of dengue fever, which has sickened nearly 6,000 children already this year. On June 2, Thailand had recorded 15,385 cases of dengue fever, which killed 11 people, according to the director-general of the Department of Disease Control.

More than a third of those cases, 5,828, have been children aged 5 – 14, 4 of whom died. Delaying treatment, underlying medical conditions and obesity all increase the chances of the mosquito-borne virus being fatal.

A recent investigation found mosquito larvae are still prevalent at Thai school campuses, some which are set to reopen on Monday as more Emergency Decree restrictions are lifted. Most were found in unused containers, plant pots, and old tyres, places where stagnant water is allowed to collect.

“The rainy season, which creates puddles of water that serve as breeding grounds for mosquitos, is the main factor that is boosting the outbreak. I would like to ask people to look out for unused containers that might become breeding grounds in households.”

Health officials in Isaan’s Ubon Ratchathani province revealed they’ve recorded 800 cases of dengue so far this year, a small number compared to the 8,000 with 10 deaths recorded last year, but still cause for worry, according to the DDC.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

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