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UPDATE: British Embassy statement on income letters

The Thaiger

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UPDATE: British Embassy statement on income letters | The Thaiger

Officials knew about problems back in May and say that US nationals will also be affected.

The British Embassy in Bangkok has responded to requests for clarification by Thaivisa on the issuing of letters regarding income.

They said that they had a meeting with immigration in May and told Thaivisa that they are “not verification experts”.

They have also claimed that US nationals will also be caught up in the problems as their embassy is also said to be stopping notarized letters in this regard as well.

The reply to questions from Thaivisa came in a statement via email from the British Embassy.

The full text of the reply is below:

“The decision was made by the British Embassy following a meeting with immigration in May in which they confirmed that they expect the embassy to verify all sources of income of British Nationals requesting an income letter.  Consular officers are not verification experts and therefore cannot fulfil (sic) this requirement. We also cannot verify income from every income source in every country of the world. Thai Immigration is able to verify the income in a Thai bank account, therefore British Nationals should show evidence of minimum funds for their visa type by showing a Thai bank statement and/or bank book. This is not a new requirement and has always been an option for foreigners renewing retirement and marriage visas in Thailand”.

Regarding the way forward the British Embassy Bangkok told Thaivisa.com

“British Nationals should now demonstrate that they have an amount of at least 800,000 baht in an account in Thailand for no less than three months prior to the visa application, or a monthly income of at least 65,000 baht transferred into an account in Thailand for a retirement visa. For a marriage visa, the amounts are at least 400,000 baht in an account in Thailand for no less than three months prior to the visa application, or a monthly income of at least 40,000 baht transferred into an account in Thailand. A bank statement should be used as the supporting document for obtaining a Thai retirement or marriage visa. If the British National doesn’t already have a bank account, they should open one and follow the steps above”.

Asked if they were aware of action by other embassies the British Embassy Bangkok said:

“Yes we are aware that the US embassy will also be stopping their notarised income letter.  Please contact them directly for further information”.

The issue has been one of the most widely commented upon stories of the year on Thaivisa.

Meanwhile the embassies of New Zealand and the Netherlands have confirmed to Thaivisa that they have no plans to stop the similar services they offer to their nationals in Thailand.

“There is no change to the New Zealand Embassy’s current process.  New Zealand nationals are welcome to visit the Embassy to  complete a statutory declaration – and declare their income.

“Alternatively, the Embassy can also issue a consular letter to those who present evidence that income earned is from the Ministry of Work and Income (WINZ) or  Ministry of Social Development (MSD). The fee for completing a statutory declaration or consular letter is 1,330 baht.”

A statement from the Embassy of the Netherlands read: “There is no indication that the Dutch Government is going to stop this service for its nationals”.

Earlier this week the Canadian Embassy in Bangkok told Thaivisa it had no plans change to its current process.

SOURCE: ThaiVisa


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Bangkok

Calls to restrict foreign property purchases in Bangkok

The Thaiger

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Calls to restrict foreign property purchases in Bangkok | The Thaiger

Dr. Sopon Pornchockchai, the President of the Thailand Agency for Real Estate Affairs, is calling for controls to restrict foreign property buyers.

Thailandproperty.news is reporting than he is justifying his comments saying the growth in income of Thais is slower than the property price rises being pushed up by high foreign demand.

“Some measures should be adopted, such as higher stamp duty for foreigners,” he said.

The article says that this is the first time an industry figure has spoken out about the need to restrict or reduce the amount of foreign investment in the Bangkok property market. Dr. Sopom says he believes that foreign buyers account for around 20 percent of all Bangkok property purchases.

He noted that Chinese purchases account for about 80 percent of foreign buyers.

Read the original story HERE.

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Food Scene

Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate 

Tim Newton

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Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | The Thaiger

Chocolate… mmmmm. But did you consider it as part of a broader savory menu? I enjoyed an evening of chocolate-infused cuisine and, well, it really works!

Mövenpick Resort & Spa Karon Beach Phuket is treating guests to a new menu of savoury dishes with a sweet twist as Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts launches its ‘Chocolate on the Salty Side’ promotion.

In celebration of Swiss cuisine and the wonderful versatility of chocolate, the brand’s talented ‘food artisans’ have made Mövenpick chocolate the hero of seven dishes in its latest global campaign, which runs to 20 November, 2018.

From salmon fillets enlivened with dark chocolate to a savoury tarte tartin with a white chocolate flourish, each new creation offers up something distinctively flavourful and showcases chocolate in new exciting ways to guests dining at Movenpick Karon Beach El Gaucho Restaurant.

Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger

The seven chocolate-inspired creations include: marinated ‘beetroot salmon’ with root vegetables and 72% dark chocolate to enhance the meal’s rich earthiness; ‘tomato tarte tartin’ where ‘white lemon’ chocolate complements the goat’s cheese, pine nuts and coffee beans; ‘sea bass and green tea’ – a light foam of green tea, almonds, nuts and Mövenpick ‘Maple Walnut’ is the star; ‘minute beef goulash’, with a traditionally-made Hungarian goulash sauce, enriched with dark chocolate; ‘lamb shank and pesto’, slow-roasted and then refined with pistachio and hazelnut chocolate pesto; and ‘duck breast and potato pie’, with white chocolate, lime and pepper giving the pink-roasted meat a delicate yet spicy freshness.

Whilst the dishes have been infused with chocolate, it’s barely noticeable in most cases but makes for some subtle new tastes on European classics.

Less subtle are the exquisite desserts which are a blatant celebration of all things chocolate. Guests can finish their meal with a tempting ‘chocolate pavés au chocolat’, combining milk chocolate, crispy cocoa bean fragments, sizzling pecan nuts and slightly bitter matcha powder, all with a hint of green tea and paired with an espresso.

The quality of Swiss craftsmanship is world-famous and even the country’s chocolate is produced with legendary precision. Mövenpick chocolate is made in keeping with the tradition, as well as its own culinary values that date back 70 years, and is produced in Switzerland using 100% cocoa butter.

Make a booking HERE or find out more about the El Gaucho Restaurant HERE.

Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger Savoury staples with a touch of the finest Swiss chocolate  | News by The Thaiger

Tim Newton was a guest of the management of Mövenpick Resort & Spa Karon Beach Phuket

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Property

Goodbye – Evicting a tenant in Thailand

Robert Virasin

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Goodbye – Evicting a tenant in Thailand | The Thaiger

It’s a goal for many people to become a landlord. They purchase property for the purpose of renting it out for passive income. The property owner interviews prospective tenants and ensures that they sign a lease agreement and put down a deposit. However, all of this doesn’t prevent bad tenants from revealing themselves after they have moved into the property – all the smiles can disappear once they get the keys.

There are several possibilities. The tenant may stop paying the rent, the tenant may not maintain the property or theymay violate the terms of the lease, such as allowing multiple families to move in or allowing pets to live in the home.

So what does the landlord do and what are your rights?

The first thing the landlord needs to do is to review the lease agreement. The lease agreement generally contains the terms by which the tenant agreed to abide. A properly prepared lease should contain the grounds for termination of the lease and the notice requirements for eviction, if the tenant does not respond to the notice.

It is also important to review the length of the lease agreement. If the end of the lease term is near, it might be easier to just send a notice to the tenant that the lease is not going to be renewed and the tenant will be required to leave the premises at the end of the contract.

There are many foreign nationals who lease property on a 30 year lease. One of the important elements of a 30 year lease is that it must be filed with the local land office. Under Section 528 of the Thai Civil and Commercial Code, if the lease agreement is not in writing, signed and registered with a ‘competent official’, then it is not valid for more than three years or the life of the parties.

After the end of the lease period, the lease agreement is generally extended for an indefinite period. This allows any of the parties to provide notice of termination of the lease with a minimum of one rent term or maximum of two months notice. If the tenant refuses to leave the property, the landlord can file a lawsuit against him.

If the landlord is able to establish in court that the tenant violated the terms of the lease agreement and that the landlord abided by the legal requirements for eviction, the court will rule in favor of the landlord, unless there are extenuating circumstances. If the tenant refuses to abide by the order of the court, the landlord can request an enforcement of the judgment.

The landlord can then request that police remove the tenant from the premises. They can also terminate electrical and water services to the property. It is important to note that the landlord cannot enter the property, remove the tenant’s belongings or change the locks on the door, unless it is allowed within the lease agreement, or with a court order.

During the entire legal process, the landlord can file a claim for the rental costs and opportunity costs as a result of the tenant refusing to leave the premises.

Leasing property is a popular way to obtain passive income or to pay for mortgaged property. However, as with any type of income-generating business, there are risks, especially in a foreign country. For landlords, there is the possibility of renting to tenants who do not maintain the property, violate the rules of the lease agreement or stop paying the rent.

The legal process for evicting tenants is painstaking and can take many months. It is important to scrutinise potential tenants and check their rental history and current financial status prior to entering into a long-term lease agreement.

Additional reporting by Yutthachai Sangsirisap.

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