Connect with us

Protests

Young Thais say political divide has caused conflict with their parents

Caitlin Ashworth

Published 

 on 

Young Thais say political divide has caused conflict with their parents | The Thaiger
  • follow us in feedly

The ongoing political protests have led to a new, raw divide in Thailand with a split between a younger generation demanding democracy and an older generation trying to protect Thailand’s Monarchy.

Student-led protests continue to call for reform of the government and the country’s monarchy. They’ve spoken up about topics considered “unprecedented” in Thai society. Royalists, generally an older generation, have shot back and held rallies to show their support for the Thai Head of State, demanding the pro-democracy protesters to stop “insulting” the monarchy.

The political climate has even caused a rift between families. 3 women shared their stories on Thisrupt, a news website which describes itself as a platform “creating provocative stories to inspire people to stand up and speak out for rights, liberty and equality.”

A 26 year old woman said her father sees her as “the enemy.” She became more interested in politics during her university years and her father would say her teachers “brainwashed” her.

Another 26 year old woman says her mother threatened to kill her following a heated argument over the pro-democracy protests. She was about to head out to a rally at the Ladprao intersection when she and her mother got into an argument. It got to the point that her mother picked up a knife and threatened to kill her, she says.

An 18 year old high school student grew up in a conservative, royalist household, but she left home due to arguments with her parents over politics. She met people from different backgrounds while attending boarding school and also learned about political views on Twitter.

Click HERE to read the 3 narratives on Thisrupt.

Catch up with the latest daily “Thailand News Today” here on The Thaiger.

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Avatar

    gosport

    November 5, 2020 at 1:14 pm

    The first reconciliation meeting should be held in every each household.

  2. Avatar

    Issan John

    November 5, 2020 at 2:03 pm

    The students have shot themselves in the foot by alienating a lot of Thais – not just the “older generation” and the pro-Royalists but those who also dislike Prayut and his government and constitution and who want change.

    They’ve refused any talks and any sort of negotiation or compromise, instead demanding that as a “first step” Prayut and the the government agree to all their demands first. That isn’t niave so much as absurd, as they’re never going to get broad-based support on that basis and even opposition parties are deserting them now.

    They’re starting to be their own worst enemies.

  3. Avatar

    Fabian

    November 5, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    It’s sad they get in conflict with their, but it’s the right thing to do.

    When I was young I argued a lot with my parents about our religion. They sais I would understand when I got older. I never did and actually my parents also quitted their religion.

    We need to get rid of the system where elders, elites, and the like impose world views on those who are developing world views. They should be taught to think critical and have open minds.

    • Avatar

      Fabian

      November 5, 2020 at 3:42 pm

      By the way, the story might suggest that all youngsters have conflicts with their parents but that’s not true. In the Khaosod protest interviews recently I heard many stories of youngsters saying their parents respect and understand what they do.

  4. Avatar

    Brian Appleyard

    November 5, 2020 at 5:26 pm

    I hope the people of the world do not let the super rich bankers . destroy democratic ,for a super Rich community piveitly run would government. I see these people being paid to start race and relidgen fighting around the world. We have all been tricked into this so called govement control ,by saying this is a Pandemic , with intact this is a Plandermice No a plane off over 50 years by the same people that pland would war 2.the same family that are still they killing people with poverty.makeing move from guns, Not the vacseen is the gun the Too kill million quietly. No blood just Death for the poor .

  5. Avatar

    Strider

    November 6, 2020 at 5:37 am

    God Bless the Child. It’s always been this way…it will always be this way until capitalism swallows itself and the civilization with it.

  6. Avatar

    Al

    November 6, 2020 at 5:06 pm

    Was wondering when an opposition would appear about a month ago – and here you are. Create and own the opposition (without most even being aware of that fact) is right out of Lenin’s rule book.

    At the moment over this beautiful planet, Marxism is rearing it’s ugly head…….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



Read more headlines, reports & breaking news in Thailand. Or catch up on your Thailand news.

Caitlin Ashworth is a writer from the United States who has lived in Thailand since 2018. She graduated from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and media studies in 2016. She was a reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette In Massachusetts. She also interned at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida.

Thailand

Bad Student protesters highlight patriarchal society where victims are blamed

The Thaiger

Published

on

Bad Student protesters highlight patriarchal society where victims are blamed | The Thaiger

After Saturday’s rally featuring the Bad Student group, some members have also began highlighting the patriarchal society of Thailand where obedience and submission runs rampant in educational institutions.

20 year old Nalinrat Tuthubthim bravely demonstrated the need for an open dialogue as she adorned an old school uniform while taping her mouth and holding a sign.

“A teacher sexually assaulted me. The school is not a safe space.”

Sexual harassment figures from the Office of Basic Education Commission are circulating online, showing hundreds of sexual harassment incidents recorded between 2013 – 2017. Thee Phawangkhanan from OBEC says that in January 2020 alone, there were over 700 cases of sexual harassment, adding that many other victims remain too scared to come forward.

Conservative Thais, such as Palang Pracharat MP Pareena Kraikupt, threatened to sue her for dishonouring the school and its uniform because she is no longer a student. And even further pointed out the embarrassment the student was allegedly causing to the country.

Such a deflection of the issue also comes with pointing fingers towards the victim as some Thais question why she didnt report the alleged incident when it happened, and instead, waited 5 years to display a banner at a rally? The shift in blame is all too common as the “patriarchy” would say it’s her fault by pointing out her clothing or by simply saying she deserves it.

The social hierarchy has long been accused of being corrupt, exploitative and abusive, in which the “poo-yai” superior has complete power over the “poo-noi” inferior. Even questioning a superior is against societal norms. There are no checks and balances on those in power. Nalinrat says it is this type of culture that created fear over reporting sexual abuse, along with her lack of understanding it due to her young age.

In an article for Thisrupt.co, she discussed her psychological trauma and disorder that resulted from the incident, as she has taken to campaigning about sexual abuse in the past 2 years. She says that men make the rules in Thai society and that there is a cultural mindset in which society blames the victim.

Nalinrat says she was met with a wall of denial when she did speak up and was demanded to be silent, finding herself joining the countless other women and children whose stories were ignored. When her story became public, she was met with victim-blaming, just as so many other women and children have suffered, while the abuser is not apprehended.

But thanks to others boldly bringing the issue to light, other groups such as Bad Medical Student are gaining momentum as they bring such allegations ranging from sexual harrassment, abusive workloads, verbal and emotional abuse, gender discrimination and many more, to light. The group, who took their name after the Bad Student group, is now taking to Twitter to voice what they say is a medical institution environment that is abusive. One Twitter user posted a message that says she was discriminated against because she was a woman.

SOURCE: Thisrupt

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Protests

Protesters target the Crown Property Bureau tomorrow, taking direct aim at the country’s Monarchy

The Thaiger

Published

on

Protesters target the Crown Property Bureau tomorrow, taking direct aim at the country’s Monarchy | The Thaiger

Tomorrow the protest road show moves to the Crown Property Bureau, taking aim directly at the the management of the Thai monarch’s affairs. Protesters, who first brought up the issue of the role of the Thai Monarchy in July this year, say they have “a big surprise” in store. This will be the first time when the entire focus of the protest will be Thailand’s Head of State, previously considered a taboo topic in Thai society and the media.

The Crown Property Bureau is the quasi-government agency responsible for managing the property of the Monarchy of Thailand. The bureau is legally defined as a juristic person and not a government agency. It has no tax obligations – Wikipedia

In speeches during last week’s protests, speakers at the rally said… “we demand the return of taxpayers’ money”.

Protest leader Arnon Nampa posted on his Facebook page… “#Nov25ProtestForReturnOfNationalAssets”.

The Free Youth group posted on their Facebook page… “See you at the Crown Property Bureau on November 25! There will be no compromise.”

But Thai PM Prayut Chan-o-cha questioned the protester’s plans…

“Why they want to get close to the Crown Property Bureau? I think you know their purpose, so there’s no use asking me.”

The Metropolitan Police are warning that the Crown Property Bureau is “royal ground” and considered off-limits for protests “according to the Public Assembly Act”. The law prohibits public assembly within a 150 metre radius of royal buildings.

Tomorrow’s protest also comes less than a week after the PM vowed to enforce “all laws” against the protesters, including the controversial lèse majesté laws. Back in June the PM said that he had been asked by His Majesty to limit the application of Thailand’s lèse majesté laws.

Back in July a 10 point manifesto was read out in a large public forum by protesters for the first time. The calling for the PM to resign, amendments to the Constitution, and dissolution of the government along with a new election, were considered a ‘staple’ for anti-government protesters. But it was the final demands, for tighter controls over the revered Thai Monarchy and reforms to the role of the country’s Head of State, that attracted attention, shocking the ‘establishment’.

The manifesto called for the annulment of the 2018 Royal Assets Structuring Act passed by the NCPO, the military Junta who overthrew the elected Yingluck Shinawatra government. The act combines His Majesty the King’s personal assets and the crown’s wealth managed by the Crown Property Bureau.

On November 18, shortly after the protesters announced their plan for Wednesday, former Army chief and ardent royalist, General Apirat Kongsompong, was appointed Crown Property Bureau deputy director. He was directly appointed by HM the King. He retired from the Army at the end of September.

The Crown Property Bureau was established under the Royal Assets Structuring Act of 1936 and became a legal entity in 1948. It replaced the Royal Treasury that existed up until the 1932 Siamese Revolution, which brought an end to absolute monarchy.

In the early 1900s, the Royal Treasury owned as much as one-fifth of the land in Bangkok, including the key business districts of Si Phraya, Bang Rak and Sampheng, according to a 2006 research paper published by the Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University’s School of Economics.

It also set up Siam Commercial Bank and Siam Cement, which have grown to become two of Thailand’s largest companies.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Protests

Protester slammed for dressing as schoolgirl to highlight sexual harassment in Thai schools

Maya Taylor

Published

on

Protester slammed for dressing as schoolgirl to highlight sexual harassment in Thai schools | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Reuters / Chalinee Thirasupa

2 government MPs have criticised a member of the “Bad Students” protest movement after she dressed as a schoolgirl to highlight sexual harassment in Thai schools. In an online protest, the activist donned a school uniform and held up a sign condemning sexual harassment in the Thai education system.

Nation Thailand reports that while her actions have generally been supported by netizens, some pro-establishment figures have hit out at the protester. Pareena Kraikupt from the ruling Palang Pracharath Party has filed a police report about the incident, saying the activist is not a school student, but a model and social media influencer. Her complaint is echoed by MP Sira Jenjaka, who says the protester’s decision to wear a school uniform will bring Thai schools into disrepute.

His accusation comes as sexual harassment figures from the Office of Basic Education Commission are circulating online, showing hundreds of sexual harassment incidents recorded between 2013 – 2017. Thee Phawangkhanan from OBEC says that in January alone, there were over 700 cases of sexual harassment, adding that many other victims remain too scared to come forward.

SOURCE: Nation Thailand

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading
Thailand News Today | Holiday road toll, protests tomorrow, GDP recovery | November 24 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 hour ago

Thailand News Today | Holiday road toll, protests tomorrow, GDP recovery | November 24

Thailand News Today | Dinosaurs in BKK, BOT tackles Baht, Special K isn’t special | November 23 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 day ago

Thailand News Today | Dinosaurs in BKK, BOT tackles Baht, Special K isn’t special | November 23

Thailand News Today | Bangkok exodus, Pattaya air pollution, Vaccine next month? | November 20 | The Thaiger
Thailand4 days ago

Thailand News Today | Bangkok exodus, Pattaya air pollution, Vaccine next month? | November 20

Thailand News Today | Protests to escalate, Domestic violence, Tourist visa exemptions? | Nov 19 | The Thaiger
Thailand5 days ago

Thailand News Today | Protests to escalate, Domestic violence, Tourist visa exemptions? | Nov 19

Thailand News Today | Emergency Decree, Protesters shot, Baht boost temporary | Nov 18 | The Thaiger
Thailand6 days ago

Thailand News Today | Emergency Decree, Protesters shot, Baht boost temporary | Nov 18

Thailand News Today | Protesters v Police, Quarantine reduction, VietJet passenger arrest | Nov 17 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | Protesters v Police, Quarantine reduction, VietJet passenger arrest | Nov 17

Thailand News Today | The RCEP reset, Hotel Talkfest, Protesters to be arrested | November 16 | The Thaiger
Thailand1 week ago

Thailand News Today | The RCEP reset, Hotel Talkfest, Protesters to be arrested | November 16

Thailand News Today | Coconut Business, Weekend protests, Pork dressed as Beef | November 13 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Coconut Business, Weekend protests, Pork dressed as Beef | November 13

Thailand News Today | More Thai Airways debt, Korean soldier, TripAdvisor warning | November 12 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | More Thai Airways debt, Korean soldier, TripAdvisor warning | November 12

Thailand News Today | PTT pays out, Revised visa requirements, Protester’s asylum | Nov 11 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | PTT pays out, Revised visa requirements, Protester’s asylum | Nov 11

Thailand News Today | Thai official positive, Head-butt latest, protest letters | November 10 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Thai official positive, Head-butt latest, protest letters | November 10

Thailand News Today | Golf STVs, Russian head-butted, protest latest | Nov 9 | The Thaiger
Thailand2 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Golf STVs, Russian head-butted, protest latest | Nov 9

Thailand News Today | Shorter quarantine, STV update, THAI jets for sale | November 6 | The Thaiger
Thailand3 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Shorter quarantine, STV update, THAI jets for sale | November 6

Thailand News Today | Political homes, Adult site bans, Nok Air rehab | November 5 | The Thaiger
Thailand3 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Political homes, Adult site bans, Nok Air rehab | November 5

Thailand News Today | Cheap flights continue, local tourism surge, fake notes | November 4 | The Thaiger
Thailand3 weeks ago

Thailand News Today | Cheap flights continue, local tourism surge, fake notes | November 4

Follow The Thaiger by email:

Trending