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Thai education set to change, prepare students for the future

Caitlin Ashworth

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Thai education set to change, prepare students for the future | The Thaiger
PHOTO: We Are CP
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Teachers may have to mix things up in the classroom. Thailand education officials are planning to change teaching with a new model they call “Education Eco-System.” The goal is to prep students for the rapidly changing future, the Education Ministry says.

Along with a new curriculum, tests will be used less to evaluate students. With demands for a competitive labour force, education officials also plan to create more opportunities for students to learn specialised skills by upping the capacity at vocational schools as well as primary and secondary schools. Minister of Education Nataphol Teepsuwan says the overall plan is to “unlock, change and widen” education.

“Thai education must shift in a way where students depart from their ‘fixed mindset’ of the past and begin to incorporate a ‘growth mindset’ in their daily lives. This is what the Education Eco-System strives to achieve. This is the modern Ministry of Education that I plan to establish.”

Part of the plan, which Teepsuwan says will “unlock” the education system, will focus on bridging the gap between state education agencies and employers. Employers, both in Thailand and overseas, will be able to provide information on skills they seek for potential employees.

“21st century has presented itself as an era where growth in knowledge is rapidly changing at an exponential rate. Consequently, the global supply of skilled labour becomes more competitive to meet new expectations. Hence, the need for individuals to become adaptive in a fast-paced environment becomes critical. The problem is straightforward, Thai education has yet to move much at all.”

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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Caitlin Ashworth is a writer from the United States who has lived in Thailand since 2018. She graduated from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and media studies in 2016. She was a reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette In Massachusetts. She also interned at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Avatar

    dimitri

    August 18, 2020 at 12:56 pm

    “tests will be used less to evaluate students”

    Amazing Thailand.

  2. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    August 18, 2020 at 12:56 pm

    Eco systems, that’s farming isn’t it?
    Yes for once the authorities have the right advice.
    “incorporate a growth mindset in their daily lives.” That’s growing rice right?
    Students today should put their ambitions of working seated in air-conditions offices out of their minds.
    There are no jobs anyway. 5000 stood in line for 300 jobs yesterday.
    Back to the fields students to a healthy but frugal living farming – it will be the only work you can get. And if you have a chance to vote, you know who to vote out.

  3. Avatar

    M Han

    August 18, 2020 at 1:13 pm

    They should start using English as a medium instead of Thai.. have some special English medium school where all teaching is on English and slowly expand this…
    More than 80% of the world’s knowledge is English based – Eg. wikipedia, google

  4. Avatar

    rinky stingpiece

    August 18, 2020 at 1:33 pm

    A tentative step in the right direction, but it needs to be stepped up to a march, a jog, and then a sprint, ASAP.

  5. Avatar

    Mike Frenchie

    August 18, 2020 at 10:22 pm

    This is very mild compared to what will follow since the -12% were recorded during a period of State supporting Thai people through subventions. Moreover, the loan grace period with banks will be finishing next October 1st and million of Thais will be unable to face their debt as soon as the moratorium expires! Exports (electr.) could rebound but the service sector will be too weak. Sad!

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