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Singapore on top, Laos on the bottom – English proficiency

Tim Newton

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Singapore on top, Laos on the bottom – English proficiency | The Thaiger

PHOTO: talkpoverty.org

The EF English Proficiency Index is out for the past 12 months, the seventh overview of countries where English is not the native language. Ranked from top to bottom and broken up into specific demographics.

And Thailand doesn’t fare well. Bad news, it’s #53 in the world this year. The good news, it’s risen from #56 last year and moved from the ‘Very Low’ category to just plain ‘Low’.

Singapore on top, Laos on the bottom - English proficiency | News by The Thaiger

In Asia the proficiency scores go from Singapore at the top with 66.03 to Laos at the bottom with 37.56. Outside Asia, many European countries rank higher with places like Netherlands (top of the world rankings), Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Luxembourg, German, Austria and Poland ranking higher than Singapore. African countries and Latin American countries fared fairly poorly.

In South East Asia, Thailand only beat out Cambodia and Laos with all other ASEAN countries performing better in the index. Thai women also outperformed Thai men with English proficiency but that trend is fairly consistent in most Asian countries.

The average English proficiency of adults in Asia is the second highest in the world, only behind Europe. A closer look at the data, however, reveals that Asia has wider proficiency disparities than any other region.

Singapore on top, Laos on the bottom - English proficiency | News by The Thaiger

Check out the full list HERE.



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Tim Newton has lived in Thailand since 2012. An Australian, he has worked in the media, principally radio and TV, for nearly 40 years. He has won the Deutsche Welle Award for best radio talk program, presented 3,200 radio news bulletins in Thailand alone, hosted 360 daily TV news programs, produced 1,800 videos, TV commercials and documentaries and now produces digital media for The Thaiger - Website, Radio, TV, Instagram and Facebook.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Honest Person

    December 19, 2017 at 5:25 am

    phuketgazette.net, You have no credibility whatsoever, you have lost me.

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Krabi

First Kunming-Krabi direct flight landed

Kritsada Mueanhawong

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First Kunming-Krabi direct flight landed | The Thaiger

The first direct flight from Kunming, China, full of Chinese passengers, has arrived at Krabi International Airport.

The General Manager of the Krabi International Airport Apichai Aranyik has welcomed the new Lucky Airline (Boeing 737) with its first direct Charter Flight from Kunming to Krabi. The flight carried 162 passengers and arrived in Krabi at 7pm last night (Sunday).

Khun Apichai says, “In the past five year since the movie ‘Lost in Thailand’ Chinese tourists becoming the top tourists visiting Krabi. At the start they were coming in tour groups.”

“After the boat disaster in Phuket in July, Chinese tourists weren’t coming to Krabi either. This first direct flight is a good sign to welcome the next wave of Chinese tourists.”

The Deputy Director of the Phuket Tourism Authority of Thailand, Montri Manator, says, “Numbers of Chinese tourists visiting Phuket in tour groups have been continuing to decrease after the Phoenix sinking on July 5 this year. But we are seeing a steady rise in the FIT (Free and Independent Travellers) from China”

Read more about the changes in Chinese tourism to Phuket HERE.

First Kunming-Krabi direct flight landed | News by The Thaiger First Kunming-Krabi direct flight landed | News by The Thaiger First Kunming-Krabi direct flight landed | News by The Thaiger

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Chiang Mai

The new visa-fee waiver working in the north

Kritsada Mueanhawong

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The new visa-fee waiver working in the north | The Thaiger

According to the National News Bureau of Thailand, the new visa-fee waiver is working. Well, in the northern provinces anyway.

The northern provinces are reporting an increase in the number of foreign visitors, thanks to the government’s free visa on arrival campaign.

Wiwat Piyawiroj , Executive Vice President of Commercial at Thai Airways, says the free visa on arrival scheme for 21 nationalities has boosted the number of foreign visitors in Thailand’s north, particularly in the tourist cities of Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai.

He notes that more Thai Airways flights have been booked by Chinese passport holders as many of them will be celebrating the Loi Krathong Festival and the western New Year in Thailand.

Another contributor to the increase in the number of foreign visitors is the secondary destination campaign which offers tour packages to lesser-known attractions, according to Wiwat.

He added that Thai Airways is conducting a feasibility study on its return to the US market with a possibility of adding direct flights to American cities, following a report that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is planning to upgrade the Thai aviation sector to Category 1.

Thailand was downgraded to Category 2 in 2015 because of its failure to comply with international safety standards. The downgrade prohibited Thai carriers from adding new routes or expanding existing services to the world’s top aviation markets such as to the US.

SOURCE: National News Bureau of Thailand

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Thai Life

ALERT: Amoxicillin use in Thai orange orchards

The Thaiger & The Nation

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ALERT: Amoxicillin use in Thai orange orchards | The Thaiger

The Thai Public Health Ministry is checking on pharmacies and antibiotics manufacturers that may have distributed amoxicillin (an antibiotic) for farms – reportedly used widely in northern and central orange orchards – as it could lead to drug resistance or even fatal allergies in humans as well as contaminating the environment.

Amoxicillin is an antibiotic often used for the treatment of a number of bacterial infections. It may be used for middle ear infection, strep throat, pneumonia, skin infections, and urinary tract infections among others. It is taken by mouth, or less commonly by injection – Wikipedia

A recent report highlighted the apparent long-standing use of amoxicillin injection into orange trees three to four times a year, to treat Citrus greening disease – caused by a bacteria spread by psyllid insects – and said that orange farmers did not realise the danger of the practice. The Ministry’s permanent secretary Dr Sukhum Kanchanapimai says that the abuse must be stopped.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Department of Medical Sciences, along with respective health offices have begun to investigate in the jurisdictions involved.

FDA deputy secretary-general Dr Surachoke Tangwiwat said his agency had required respective provincial health offices to check on orange orchards for the distribution of amoxicillin to orange farmers and ensure that the sale of antibiotics is made only at pharmacies with pharmacists.

The agency also warned antibiotics manufacturers to distribute antibiotics to pharmacies and not directly to farmers or they will face legal actions.

Pharmacist Supanai Prasertsuk, coordinator for the pharmacists’ follow-up group for borderland medicine issues under the Drug System Monitoring and Development Centre, said his members had identified the issue of antibiotic use in fruit and vegetable farming in the North.

This misuse of amoxicillin – which is among the most-used antibiotics to treat infections in humans and must be prescribed by pharmacists – can lead to environmental contamination, especially at water sources.

The consumers’ secondary exposure to such medicine can lead to serious or even fatal reactions among those allergic to antibiotics, and the farmers’ direct exposure to such medicine that can lead to allergic reactions, Supanai said.

He said that farms would most likely not use antibiotic capsules but a chemical powder format, which can cause it to scatter. Although there was no research to confirm antibiotic contamination from the use in orange orchards, he said the sensible precaution was to stop such use.

The Public Health Ministry should check farmers’ physical conditions as well as samples from soil and water to study for a contamination, while farmers should shift to organic farming guidelines, Supanai said.

Supanai also urged the authority to check on the sale of chemicals (used in making amoxicillin) to farmers as such substances were also considered dangerous medicines. The sale of the drug by non-pharmacists violated the law so the sellers and manufacturers could be held accountable.

Supanai advised those allergic to amoxicillin to avoid consumption while those without allergies should refrain from consuming a large amount and to leave a seven-day gap between consumption.

SOURCE: The Nation

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