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Cleaning the concrete and paving in Thailand

Tanutam Thawan

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Cleaning the concrete and paving in Thailand | The Thaiger

With the wet season comes the rain. And with the rain, plus the ongoing hot weather, mould and algae growing on all our outdoor walls and paving.

Rain + algae + mould looks awful and can be very slippery. Stains can also make your investment look old and unwanted. Black mould can cause allergies for some people

You have two choices. Maintain them yourself or get someone in to do it for you. If you would like to save a few baht and do it yourself here are a few proven methods.

Before you even start a few warnings. Don’t use any of these cleaning methods on a large area before you’re completely sure it’s going to work. Try out your chosen method on a small area first to check that it won’t harm the surface and that it actually does the cleaning you expect.

Also, ask around. Many houses in Thailand have concrete, aggregate, paving and tiling outside so we all have the same problems. See what’s worked with others around your area. Also be aware some of the chemicals can be dangerous for you and for the environment. There’s plenty of alternatives these days that are safe and effective.

Whilst there is no magic solution, keeping up regular maintenance is your best answer. Doing a quick, regular clean is going to be a lot easier than, say, an annual clean where it just becomes a lot of hard work, or expense. And messy.

Before you do anything else move all the furniture away, clear the area and make sure any weeds are removed before starting.

Bleach
Beach will remove stains from practically anything. Since pavers and aggregate surfaces are mostly made of concrete, bleach can be a good way to remove stains, black mould and algae from them, if used correctly.

Diluting the bleach is extremely important if you want to protect the color of your patio or driveway. Mix half a cup of bleach with around 5 cups of water, and add a spoonful of dish-washing liquid to it. Bleach is quite dangerous and shouldn’t get in contact with your skin. Wear gloves. It’s also generally toxic for plants so don’t use it around lawns or garden beds.

Spray this using a spray bottle on the surface and let it soak in for 15-20 minutes depending upon how dirty the surface is. A little bit longer for stubborn stains and really long-term build ups of mould.

Scrub the pavers with a brush that has nylon or natural bristles. Rinse off the solution with water – high-pressure water cleaner will add some muscle to the chemical reaction. Let your pavers dry in the heat.

Chlorine
Yeah, the stuff they put into your swimming pool to keep it free of nasty bacteria and the water clean. Chlorine can also be used to clean your patio or driveway, especially the black mould, moss and algae.

Mix chlorine and water (10% chlorine, 90% water) in a spray bottle. Spray the mixture on the paving thoroughly and evenly, and let it soak in for 10-30 minutes minutes. Follow up with scrubbing the pavers to remove any excess dirt or particularly stubborn stained areas. like with the bleach, use gloves and protect your skin from coming into contact with the chlorine. Also make sure that you’ve got good ventilation around the area (your very probably outside anyway).

Chlorine is toxic for you and your plants. If it splashes on your clothes you’ll most likely get bleached splotches so don’t wear your latest Armani purchase whilst using chlorine (same with the full-strength bleach).

Vinegar (acetic acid)
It stinks but vinegar is one of the best choices you could make to clean your concrete pavers and paving. It’s non-toxic and a better alternative around pets and kids.

Spray full-strength vinegar using a spray bottle on the affected parts of the patio or driveway. Let the vinegar soak in completely – say a good 60 minutes or so. Then spray the paving with a mixture of soap and water and scrub with a brush to remove any dirt that may have been overlooked by the vinegar.

Better to use white vinegar as it doesn’t stain.

Soap and Water
This simple combination of soap and water is a safe, reliable combination but needs a little ‘elbow grease’ or mechanical assistance to get the same results.

Start off with a high-pressure washer. Use this first to remove the worst of the stains, mould and algae. Then apply the detergent and water and scrub the rest by hand. Doing this removes the rest of the grunge and goo. These magic machines will blast off just about any mould, mildew or moss. WARNING: Don’t put your hands or anybody else close to the high-pressure stream of water and air!

With high pressure cleaners, at this stage, we haven’t found any places where you can rent these units for an afternoon. But, if you’re going to be doing regular cleaning yourself the investment is quite reasonable – you can pick up a fairly good one for 5,000 baht. They’re always on display near the front of most Home Pro or Thai Watsadu stores. Better still, ask the neighbour if you can borrow theres and buy them a nice bottle of wine as a thank you 🙂

Cleaning the concrete and paving in Thailand | News by The Thaiger

A few other things
For fresh oil or grease stains use baking soda and apply it to the stains. Leave it for a good hour. Remove the baking soda then apply again of the oil or grease stains are bad.

There’s nothing better than regular cleaning. Even if you just regularly sweep the pavers, or spray them with water, it will help prevent the spores settling and starting to grow.

Once all bright and shiny consider using a paving sealer. They are readily available, easy to apply and make the cleaning a lot easier as the spores, grunge and dirt won’t sink into the porous paving surface.

Try one, try all methods. Tell us which works best or any other methods you’ve tried with success or the ones that have been a complete failure.



Find more property for sale and rent across Thailand at Thaiger Property, powered by FazWaz. You can even list your property for free.

Local Thai journalist speaking fluent Thai and English. Tanutam studied in Khon Kaen before attending Bangkok’s Chulalongkhorn University.

Phang Nga

Phuket’s hotel and property players look north

Bill Barnett

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Phuket’s hotel and property players look north | The Thaiger

by Bill Barnett of c9hotelworks.com

One of Greater Phuket’s real estate and hotel market’s that has a decided buzz of late is the area up over the Sarasin bridge in Phang Nga.

In Natai, the entry of the Baba Beach Club and nearby Akyra is creating renewed visibility for the broad West Coast stretch of white sand beach.

Two upscale hotels are in the development phase in the vicinity, with one being flagged to an international hotel operator.

Up at the 1,000 plus rai Thai Muang mega-project, movement is once again underway, as is a nearby massive Japanese-led mixed-use project including a golf course.

Land values are currently running amuck in the Koh Kloi area where the AOT (Airports of Thailand) has reportedly acquired land for an upcoming Phang Nga airport which will provide Phuket with a second gateway alternative.

Premium land transactions are taking place, with the most notable being the recent trade of the former oceanfront site in Bodan that was to be at various stages first a Raffles and later a Ritz-Carlton Reserve.

Looking at Phuket’s light-rail initiative, one knock-on effect will be the eventual linkage between the island and larger connection to a broader rail terminus in Koh Kloi. This will likely spur real estate speculators to acquire peripheral locations.

As Phang Nga’s West Coast four land highway expansion moves forward to Khao Lak and beyond, Phuket’s Northern neighbor is seeing a renewed push in its tourism, property and infrastructure.

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Property

Centara strikes deal for three new hotels in Laos

Tanutam Thawan

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Centara strikes deal for three new hotels in Laos | The Thaiger

Thailand’s leading hotel operator Centara Hotels, announced it has signed management agreements for three new properties with a combined total of 216 keys, with Asia Investment, Development & Construction Sole Co., Ltd (AIDC), a well-established enterprise in Laos.  In the UNESCO World Heritage site of Luang Prabang, Centara plans to open an upper upscale Centara Grand Luang Prabang and a midscale Centra by Centara property, both near the town centre. The third property will be under Centara’s new lifestyle brand, COSI, catering to the growing segment of connected, freedom-loving travellers. It will represent a unique offering in Vientiane, the Laotian capital.

The management agreement comes as Laos launches ambitious new plans to promote tourism. In recent years, the government of the Lao PDR has come to regard tourism as a priority sector for driving socio-economic development. It hopes to attract 5 million visitors in 2018 and increasing numbers in the years ahead with a Visit Laos campaign under the slogan “Simply Beautiful.”

According to a new report from the Swiss-based World Economic Forum, Laos ranks 14th among 136 countries in price competitiveness.

“This partnership with AIDC is a great opportunity to expand our footprint into a distinctive country,” said Centara CEO Thirayuth Chirathivat.

“Laos is on the list of more and more travellers to this region, and we want to serve them with the distinct and varied accommodation options to match the travel experience they are seeking.”

Luang Prabang is the well-preserved, old spiritual city at the confluence of the Khan and Mekong rivers. Although well-served by direct flights to its airport and modern amenities, it lives up to its World Heritage status with beautiful temples and traditional riverside life. Bicycles outnumber cars. Delicious baguettes, croissants, cafés and French restaurants hint at the French colonial history in both Luang Prabang and Vientiane.

Pheutsapha Phoummasak, President of AIDC Laos said “We are excited to partner with Centara to bring their trusted brands to these great cities and further promote the tourism potential of Laos. Luang Prabang and Vientiane are very popular destinations for both Thai and international travellers thanks to their perfect blend of history, beautiful scenery and charming character”

The three new hotels are the latest evidence of Centara’s expansion strategy, which calls for doubling the number of properties under its management during the next five years. This latest development will see Centara’s hotel count in Laos reach four with Centara Plumeria Resort Pakse already well under development and scheduled to open in 2020.

Centara strikes deal for three new hotels in Laos | News by The Thaiger

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Bangkok

Co-working space – not just for start-ups

Tanutam Thawan

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Co-working space – not just for start-ups | The Thaiger

PHOTO: HUBBA-TO co-working space in Bangkok

by Thanchanok Phobut | Senior Coordinator, CBRE Thailand

CBRE, an international property consultancy company, reveals that co-working space seems to be on the tip of everyone’s tongue these days. There was a time when no-one knew what the term “serviced office” meant or why someone would want such an option. But today, you can’t open a business publication without seeing an article about co-working. Most people think of co-working spaces as being a thriving hub of young latte-sipping, technology entrepreneurs, coming up with the next big idea that will make them multi-millionaires.

While there is an element of truth to this image, the end-goal for many co-working space operators is to change the way that companies, not just start-ups, source their office space. They want companies to pay for office space as a service rather than follow the traditional route of signing a lease, fitting out their own space, having an office manager maintain the premises and hiring their own employees for reception and administrative duties.

Co-working office operators usually offer companies their own private space. It is most common to be offered an office based on the size you will need to fit in a set number of desks. For example, if your company has four employees, your package offer will include a furnished closed office with four desks, 4 chairs and optional telecommunications equipment for four people (internet service, phone number and a telephone handset).

There is usually a common kitchen area and spaces to meet and mingle. Think of it like a five-star hotel, you’re not sharing a room, but you are getting a high level of service and amenities on the premises.

You usually have a short-term commitment, not signing a lease for years. The best deal is usually for a year or more, but you can lease your office for as short as one month. Starting and ending your relationship with an operator is most often quick and easy. Since the office is already outfitted and reception services provided, getting to work is much quicker than when you need to design your new space yourself or hire your own support staff.

“Competition in the space is red hot. As more and more offices pop up, the fight to achieve 100% occupancy is fierce. When shopping for your space, be sure to consider more than just price, as the services and reputation of your provider are just as important.

“If you do your homework, you’ll avoid the pitfalls of co-working space, such as unreturned deposits, unexpectedly thin walls between units or fees for things like coffee and copying that you didn’t expect. The great news is, changing providers is much easier than with traditional space,” states Mr. Nithipat Tongpun, Head of Advisory & Transaction Services – Office, CBRE Thailand.

According to a recent CBRE report on the New York City office market:

  • While traditional long-term leases are the preferred model for business and the foundation of the commercial office market, the rapid growth of third-party flexible space operators provides occupiers with a wide variety of options for leasing office space. Since 2013, when the expansion of third-party flexible space began to gain significant traction, the sector has averaged an annual growth rate of 22 percent.
  • There are strong indicators of user demand for the services of the third-party space providers. In fact, 75 percent of corporate occupiers anticipate including co-working or flexible space in their occupancy portfolio over the next three years.
  • Smaller users also continue to be an important part of the target market; as the flexible space footprint has grown in Manhattan, the amount of traditional leasing among tenants under 5,000 sq. ft. has dropped off by 42 percent between 2013 and year-end 2017, suggesting that these users are migrating to flexible space solutions.

In Bangkok, four large co-working space operators are opening in multiple locations. JustCo, Spaces, The Great Room and WeWork leased a combined total of 25,000 square metres of space in some of Bangkok’s best office buildings last year and they are still growing.

“I recently met Yvan Maillard, general manager of The Great Room‘s Singapore operation and he said that, in Singapore, 30% of his clients are late stage start-ups, 30 % are private investment family offices and 30% are mainstream corporates. In the case of corporates, they often lease co-working space as a stopgap before finding a larger permanent office for their expanding team,” said Mr. James Pitchon, Head of Research and Consulting, CBRE Thailand.

It is not only the way companies source their office space that is changing. Even those companies who continue to lease office space directly are changing the way that they use the space – having your own office or even your own desk is out of fashion – agile working is all the rage.

Mr. Nihipat added, “Companies are providing employees with a daily choice of environments from quiet space to a layout that enables teams to collaborate. Employees are expected to move around the office, depending on their tasks. The objective is to create a workspace that fulfills the employees’ needs in a high-quality environment, while minimizing the number of individual desks needed, effectively putting more people to work in less space.”

Globally and in Bangkok, the office market will continue to evolve and while traditional leases are yet to be seen as a thing of the past, CBRE expects more companies to provide agile working environments. CBRE also expects to see significant growth in the amount of co-working spaces provided by third party suppliers.

“This will mean an increase in the demand for high quality buildings with flexible, column free floor plates, technically advanced air conditioning and temperature control, as well as sufficient lift capacity to deal with higher rates of occupation density.

Many of the new generation of buildings currently under construction or being planned in Bangkok will have these features and we won’t be surprised to see more and more co-working spaces open their doors as companies weigh the real advantages of this option versus traditional space.

Co-working space - not just for start-ups | News by The Thaiger

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