Connect with us

News

“Labels Out For Autism Campaign”. Monday, April 2.

Donna Toon

Published

on

“Labels Out For Autism Campaign”. Monday, April 2. | The Thaiger

World Autism Day, April 2, 2018, wear your “Labels Out For Autism Campaign”

On Monday, April 2, 2018, join The Thaiger, KIS Phuket and NP Graphics and Photography in celebrating the individuals on World Autism Awareness Day and raising autism awareness in Phuket.

Simply bare your label and wear your shirt inside out for one day, to show we all understand that labels do not define us. The Labels Out for Autism Campaign intends to build greater understanding, empathy and community responsibility in making Phuket autism aware. Visit The Thaiger’s Facebook page for more information and free teaching resources.

Autism is a noun. We do not learn anything about an individual from the single noun ‘autism’. The label alone has no purpose in helping you to understand them, to build a picture of their appearance and personality or in knowing their potential. Only getting to know them as individuals will help with that.

As Dr. Stephen Shore stated, “If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.”

Labelling creates stereotypes, which can mask an individual’s abilities, gifts, strengths, interests and real personality. Autism affects tens of millions worldwide. All these people cannot possibly be defined by one word.

As of 2013, all previous subcategories of autism (such as Asperger’s Syndrome) now fall under one umbrella diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others.

While autistic people share certain difficulties, being autistic will affect each person in different ways. It is important not to let a label create an image of a person.

Thanks to Laura Sage, Special Educational Needs Coordinator at Kajonkiet International School Phuket.

Looking for more help and support regarding autism? Try these websites…

www.autismspeaks.org

http://www.autism.org.uk/

www.autismawarenessthailand.com


Read more headlines, reports & breaking news in Phuket.

Originally from New Zealand, Donna Toon has been living in Thailand for the last 9 years with her husband Scot and their two boys Jackson and Oliver. After graduating with a Degree in Hospitality Management, Donna has travelled the world with a desire to develop her craft. A recent move from hospitality has seen Donna immerse herself into the media and radio industry, consulting for a number of media companies.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Chiang Rai

Ceremony held in Chiang Rai marking 100 days since the death of Saman Kunan

The Thaiger

Published

on

Ceremony held in Chiang Rai marking 100 days since the death of Saman Kunan | The Thaiger

PHOTO: Thai PBS

A religious ceremony has been held at a temple and near the entrance to the Tham Luang cave in Chiang Rai to mark the 100th day of the death of Saman Kunan, a former Thai Navy SEAL member, who died trying to help save the trapped Mu Pa football team.

The religious ceremony was organised by the Mae Sai district office, the Chiang Rai cultural office and the provincial office of social development.  The 13 Mu Pa team members and their parents were involved in yesterday’s ceremonies.

Thai PBS reports that the religious ceremony started at Wat Phra That Doi Wa in Mae Sai district, then the temple’s abbot led the group to the entrance of Tham Luang cave, where the 13 were trapped for more than two weeks before being rescued by Thai and international team of skilled cave rescuers.

Tham Luang park officials opened the gate at the cave entrance to allow all the ceremony participants into the cave’s first large chamber to pay their respects to ‘Ja Sam’ and all the other people involved in the search and rescue operations.

Another religious ceremony was held at the nearby museum where a huge painting, depicting rescuers and telling a story of the rescue mission, was put on display in honor of all participants in the rescue mission that captured international attention.

The painting was painted by national artist Chalermchai Kositpipat and several Chiang Rai artists.

Ceremony held in Chiang Rai marking 100 days since the death of Saman Kunan | News by The Thaiger

Continue Reading

Opinion

Wai Khru – setting a bad example for the future. Thailand’s demand for respect from its young

The Thaiger

Published

on

Wai Khru – setting a bad example for the future. Thailand’s demand for respect from its young | The Thaiger

Hazing (US English), initiation ceremonies (British English), bastardisation (Australian English), ragging (South Asia), or deposition, refers to the practice of rituals, challenges, and other activities involving harassment, abuse or humiliation used as a way of initiating a person into a group including a new fraternity, sorority, team or club.

In Thailand, hazing is not only rife, it’s seen as a rite of passage for young Thais as part of their cultural inculcation into the subservience they’re expected to display elders or people with more money or higher positions than them. What’s mistaken for ‘respect’ is actually a cultural party trick where children and young adults are ‘trained’ to be deferential from an early age.

In recent years there have a been a few high-profile deaths of army trainees, in the care of their Academy leaders, but allegedly subjected to initiations and bastardisation that is just ‘par for the course’ for the education of young Thais.

In a response to the recent death of Phakhapong Tanyakan at the Armed Forces Academies Preparatory School on October 17 last year, the Thai Deputy PM and Defence Minister Prawit Wongsuwan claimed that he “was not beaten to death, but just too weak to withstand tough training.”

He went further saying “I was once beaten more than I could take and I fainted too. I didn’t die. For this, before the school accepts kids for entry, they must give them a proper physical check-up.”

When you get you get such official, public, responses from the top you can see how this hazing culture continues to thrive in the, otherwise, Land of Smiles.

We spoke to three foreign teachers in Thailand, all speaking on condition of anonymity, about the culture of hazing in their schools and the benign version of that in primary schools, ‘wai khru’.

“Hazing is seen in many different types of social groups, including gangs, sports teams, schools, military units, fraternities and sororities. The initiation rites can range from relatively benign pranks and was khru, to protracted patterns of behavior that rise to the level of abuse or criminal misconduct.”

For the families of hazing victims these ceremonies can be catastrophic, as in the tragic case of Phakhapong Tanyakan.

A 19-year-old armed forces cadet, previously subjected to harsh physical discipline, suddenly died a day after returning to school from a break. His parents were told he suffered from a sudden cardiac arrest but became suspicious of possible foul play after a detailed autopsy report never came. – Khaosod English

But he’s not the only one. Hazing and cruel or unusual initiations are conducted every day around the Kingdom but with a growing concern about the practices, both from the young students themselves and concerned older Thais, who realise the dangers of ‘persuading’ youngsters to respect elders needs examination in a modern 21st century Thailand.

We spoke to a respected senior Thai businessperson, again on the condition of anonymity, who said he had seen too much hazing going on during his time at school and then whilst training in the military.

“I was a victim of this type of bullying. I was told to ‘be a man’ and that all Thai men have to go through this. I think it is degrading and breaks human spirits. It teaches fear of those we are meant to respect. It has to change.”

It all starts when young Thais are subjected to the Wai Khru or ‘Teacher Wai’ where students are expected to prostrate themselves in front of their teachers in a show of respect. But a broad spectrum of foreign teachers not only feel uncomfortable with this faux-deference, some of them go out of their way to be away for that day or, sometimes, even speak out about their concern with this tradition.

“I made the mistake of speaking out about the Wai Khru in our school. I just found it demeaning for the poor students who had to rehearse all week for this totally meaningless show of respect. I didn’t feel respected, I felt sick. I ended up being ostracised and had to leave that school.”

Whilst many Thais continue to wonder why westerners might find all this kowtowing and prostrating could cause concern, you just need to examine the deaths in the Army preparatory schools as the end result of ‘demanding’ obedience and deference to elders. In western culture, I have learned, respect is something that is earned, not demanded.

“Hazing is undignified, humiliating and cruel… not my words, but the words of students who are made go through this horrible experience. It’s meant to be a sign of showing respect to your seniors but it’s nothing more than a shameful indulgence at the expense of the students,” said a long-term foreign teacher.

“Making students crawl around on the ground acting like animals in front of their peers, does nothing for either senior or freshie students. I have stopped attending Wai Khru day as I find it terribly uncomfortable for myself and for the students. You can see the look in their eyes as they approach you and are ordered to bow before the teacher. Teachers, like everyone else, should learn how to earn the respect of their students.”

A young female foreign teacher first thought that the Wai Khru was ‘cute’ but has changed her tune over the years.

“Wai khru was the highlight of my first year teaching in Thailand. I was, and still am, extremely humbled and deeply touched by this beautiful tradition intended to recognise a teachers’ role in children’s life and to give said children the opportunity to express their gratitude to their teachers.

“But throughout the years I have started to look at this event with a more critical eye and I wish it weren’t as rehearsed and staged as it unfortunately is. At our school, rehearsals for Wai Kru start a week prior to the event. During this week, children are drilled incessantly until they have mastered the walk, the bow and the wai leading up to the offering of the flowers that they are eager to free their sweaty little palms of.”

Wai Khru continues to be practiced in all Thai schools as a long standing tradition and show of respect for teachers.

“Although I understand and commend the wonderful intentions behind such practices, I feel that much like other sorts of drilling that these students endure, this sadly takes away from the true purpose of it all. For want of a picture perfect event, meaning is lost and a demonstration of gratitude is transformed into a dreaded labour,” she said.

An investigation into the death of Army cadet Phakhapong Tanyakan, by military investigators, found no wrongdoing by the Preparatory School. The parents have consistently called for a probe into their son’s death and are still pursuing legal action.

Wai Khru - setting a bad example for the future. Thailand's demand for respect from its young | News by The ThaigerPHOTO: Army cadet Phakhapong Tanyakan, who died at the Armed Forces Academies Preparatory School on October 17 last year.

Continue Reading

South

Pattani policeman’s house attacked by southern insurgents

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Pattani policeman’s house attacked by southern insurgents | The Thaiger

Southern insurgents have attacked the house of a policeman in Pattani’s Nong Chik district with assault rifles and a molotov cocktails late last night.

Police say it’s lucky that no one was injured in the attack. Pol Senior Sgt Maj Anusorn Khantikulanon, an official of the training division of Provincial Police Bureau 9, and his wife were not home.

Their son was home alone but was uninjured.

Police say that two insurgents arrived on a motorcycle and opened fire on the house with an MP16 assault rifle. Twenty spent shells of M16 ammunition have been found at the scene during the investigation.

They say that the assailants also threw two petrol bombs at the house but they hit a concrete wall nearby and didn’t damage the house. Two broken glass bottles were found at the scene of the attack.

Pattani policeman's house attacked by southern insurgents | News by The Thaiger

SOURCE: The Nation

Continue Reading

The Thaiger Newsletter

Keep up with all the day’s news. Subscribe here.

The latest news and information from Thailand.

* indicates required

Trending