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Plastics

PM not bothered by threats from smaller coalition parties to remove support

Maya Taylor

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PM not bothered by threats from smaller coalition parties to remove support | The Thaiger
Photo: thaigov.go.th
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The PM Prayut Chan-o-cha says he’s not too concerned by threats from five coalition parties to withhold support unless the government provides satisfactory answers during the upcoming no-confidence grilling.

Thai PBS World says the PM claims all parties are getting along fine, adding that while he can’t make any party vote in a particular way, neither can the parties force him to do their bidding.

He went on to say that should the government not survive the no-confidence debate, it would be the citizens of Thailand and the country as a whole that would suffer, with the political parties involved having to pick up the pieces.

Meanwhile, the Opposition chief whip says public opinion is in their favour. He says they have asked the people for their opinion and the results show they agree with the moves to censure the government.

The opposition will concentrate on allegations of corruption, inefficiency in national administration, legal infringements, as well as robbing Thailand of opportunities.

Thai PBS World reports that the debate is expected to take place at the end of November.

SOURCE: ThaiPBS

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Myanmar

113 bodies recovered in Myanmar jade mine mudslide

Jack Burton

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113 bodies recovered in Myanmar jade mine mudslide | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Fire Services Department Handout

At least 113 are dead after a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar. The Myanmar Fire Services Department says that the incident took place early today in the jade-rich Hpakant district of the northern Kachin state after a heavy rainfall. Photos in the post showed a search and rescue team wading through a valley apparently flooded by the mudslide.

“The jade miners were smothered by a wave of mud. A total of 113 bodies have been found so far.”

“Now we recovered more than 100 bodies,” a local official with the information ministry told Reuters by phone, “Other bodies are in the mud. The numbers are going to rise.”

Fatal landslides are common in the poorly regulated mines of Hpakant, the victims often from impoverished communities who risk their lives hunting the translucent green gemstone.

A 38 year old miner who witnessed the incident says he spotted a tall pile of waste that appeared to be on the verge of collapse and was about to take a picture when people began shouting “Run, run!”

“Within a minute, all the people at the bottom of the hill just disappeared. I feel empty in my heart. I still have goose bumps… There were people stuck in the mud shouting for help but no one could help them.”

Aung San Suu Kyi’s government promised to clean up the industry when it took power in 2016, but activists say little has changed.

Official sales of jade in Myanmar were worth $750 million US dollars (23.3 billion baht) in 2016-2017, according to data published by the government. Experts say the true value of the industry, which mainly exports to China, is much larger.

Northern Myanmar’s abundant natural resources – including jade, timber, gold and amber – have also helped finance both sides of a decades long civil war between ethnic Kachin and the military. The fight to control the mines and the money they bring frequently traps locals in the middle.

SOURCE: Al Jazeera | Newsvoice

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Crime

2 arrested in Narathiwat with 1,420 kilograms of meth – VIDEO

Jack Burton

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2 arrested in Narathiwat with 1,420 kilograms of meth – VIDEO | The Thaiger
PHOTOS: Thairath

Police in the southern province of Narathiwat, on the Malaysian border, arrested 2 men and seized and 1,420 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine hidden in a trailer truck in Tak Bai district in the early hours of this morning. A team of police, soldiers and local officials was sent to Padador village in tambon Na Nak following a tip that a large quantity of drugs would be smuggled into the area.

At around 2:30am, they team noticed an 18-wheel trailer truck with Surat Thani licence plates parked along a road in in the village. 2 men, identified as driver Somchai Thiankhrue from Nakhon Si Thammarat, and passenger Khamron Chanthamanee from Songkhla, were inside. Officers demanded to search the vehicle, which was loaded with steel bars. The men gave conflicting statements and acted suspiciously during questioning. The officers took them and the truck to nearby Muno police station.

During the search, the team found 35 fertiliser sacks containing 1,420 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine hidden in the trailer truck.

Somchai and Khamron told police that a man, identified as Arwae Mohbakor, had asked them to meet him in the village and then follow him to deliver the drugs to another venue in Sungai Kolok, at the border. The team went to Arwae’s house in Tak Bai and his wife’s house in Sungai Kolok, but they both managed to flee before the team arrived. Authorities have ordered personnel at checkpoints to inspect vehicles carefully and hunt them down.

Team members say the seized drugs have a street value of over one billion baht.

2 arrested in Narathiwat with 1,420 kilograms of meth - VIDEO | News by The Thaiger2 arrested in Narathiwat with 1,420 kilograms of meth - VIDEO | News by The Thaiger

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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Economy

Draft law would ban online alcohol sales in Thailand

Jack Burton

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Draft law would ban online alcohol sales in Thailand | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Nordan.org

In April, the government imposed a nationwide ban on the sale of alcoholic beverages as part of the Emergency Decree to stem the spread of Covid-19. Now the country’s top alcohol regulator has approved a draft regulation to ban online alcohol sales. The move comes after alcohol watchdog groups urged the government to crack down on the online sales, which surged during the local pandemic lockdown response from the Thai government. The deputy health minister says the new rule aims to prevent consumers from “having easy access to alcohol”.

“The Covid-19 outbreak has given rise to online sales of alcoholic beverages, especially on social media, where promotions and home delivery services are offered. There are no age, time, or location restrictions, resulting in uncontrolled access to alcohol and difficulty in enforcing the alcoholic beverage control law.”

Under current law, online sale of alcoholic isn’t prohibited provided the vendor holds a valid license. However, it’s illegal to post photos or publicly encourage people to consume or purchase booze, including on the internet.

Officials say the new restrictions will take effect soon, though the exact date is yet to be announced.

The chief of the Disease Control Department says the new rule will not apply to establishments that use electronic devices to display their drink menu since the transaction does not take place online.

Yesterday, representatives of alcohol merchants and brewers handed a petition to the Alcohol Control Board asking the government to postpone the decision, saying the industry is still reeling from the coronavirus crisis. According to the president of the Craft Beer Import and Distribution Association:

“Although alcohol can be sold now, businesses have to communicate with their customers. This will make things more difficult for the industry.”

Alcohol sales will be prohibited from this Saturday to Monday due to a Buddhist holiday over the weekend.

SOURCE: Khaosod English

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