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THAILAND NEWS TODAY | Korean woman arrested for 5-million-baht theft, 6-year overstay

The Thai cabinet decided Tuesday to revoke a law, which has been in force for
more than three decades, exempting stock market share trades from financial
transaction tax. Finance Minister Arkhom Termpittayapaisith
said that the abrogation of the law means that all trading of stocks on
the stock market, whether at a profit or loss, will be subject to
a financial transaction tax of 0.1%. He said that the government is
expected to gain at least 15 billion baht a year from the tax, adding that
the Council of State will have to draft a law to impose the tax.
Share traders will be given a 3-month grace period before the law comes into force,
following its publication in the Royal Gazette. The minister said that the new tax
is part of a restructuring, to enhance financial discipline and generate income for the state.
Meanwhile, Revenue Department Director-General Lawaron Saengsanit said that
0.1% is just the ceiling rate and the actual rate has not yet been set.
He added, however, that the seven types of Retirement Savings Funds remain
exempt from financial transaction taxation. Dr. Pakorn Peetathawatchai,
president of Stock Exchange of Thailand, said he will hold discussions with
the Association of Securities Company about the system
adjustments required to accommodate the taxation, the collection of which
brokerage companies will undertake, before passing the money on to the Revenue
Department.

 

The Bank of Thailand (BoT) raised its key interest rate by 25 basis points for a
third straight meeting on Wednesday, as it tries to contain above-target inflation
while supporting an economic recovery facing increasing global headwinds.
The BoT monetary policy committee voted unanimously to raise the one-day
repurchase rate to 1.25% at its final review of the year.
All but two of the 19 economists surveyed by Reuters had expected a quarter-point
hike while the remaining two had predicted no policy change.
The central bank said in a statement on Wednesday that Thailand recorded a
current account surplus of US$0.8 billion in October after a surplus of $0.6 billion
the previous month. Exports, a key driver of growth, fell 3.6% year-on-year
in October, with imports up 5.4% year-on-year.
The trade surplus stood at copy.7 billion, the BoT said.

 

Korean woman arrested for 5-million-baht theft, 6-year overstay
A lesson that never seems to be learned is that, if you’re illegally overstaying in a
country, try not to commit crimes and bring attention to yourself. A South Korean woman
was arrested in Bangkok for stealing a car, bag, and watch valued at over 5 million baht
from a South Korean friend. Both the Korean man and Korean woman were also on
overstay and will be punished.The woman was arrested on Sukhumvit Road
according to an explanation from the Royal Thai Immigration Police yesterday.
She was identified only as Ms Kim from South Korea.
An arrest warrant had been issued for her in the Bangkok South
Criminal Court two weeks ago on November 14.
When police caught up with her, they discovered that her passport stamp had expired
2,116 days ago. The South Korean woman had illegally overstayed her permitted time in
Thailand by nearly 6 years. Apparently, the theft was brought to light after
a person police described as her close male friend Mr Lee was taken into custody
for overstaying his passport stamp. It was not revealed if he had a short overstay
or a monumental one like Ms Kim. According to The Pattaya News, while being detained,
Mr Lee told police that Ms Kim had stolen his car, his watch, and his bag.
The total value of the stolen property was 5.3 million baht.
Now the South Korean woman is in double trouble, facing prosecution for the theft
charges as well as the second prosecution for her extremely long overstay. Police will
first pursue charges against her for the theft accusations. After those legal proceedings
have finished, she will be punished for her overstay.
At the conclusion of whatever punishment, she receives for stealing the car, watch, and
bag, Thai Immigration will deport the woman at her own expense. She will be
permanently blacklisted from ever returning to Thailand.

 

Violent criminals in Thailand to be tagged for 10 years after release to protect
women Justice Minister Somsak Thepsutin wanted the man who raped a woman, 18,
in Ubon Ratchathani province to wear an electronic monitoring (EM) bracelet for 10
years as he had repeated the crime without any respect for the law.
The minister was referring to Pathanin, a 41-year-old native of Ubon Ratchathani,
who assaulted the young woman at the Thung Sri Mueang public park and raped
her. The minister said the man was a danger to society because police found
another victim detained at his house after arresting him. Pathanin had been jailed twice,
in 2016 for theft and in 2017 for illicit drug. He was released in December last year.
There is a new law to prevent criminals from repeating their sexual and violent
offences. Under the new law that will take effect on Jan 23, 2023, relevant officials
can seek court orders to use EM bracelets with such criminals for up to 10 years.
They will be also monitored by probation volunteers and will be imprisoned right
when they misbehave, Mr Somsak said.
“I ordered the Rights and Liberties Protection Department to help the two victims.
They will receive financial aid worth up to 110,000 baht each. Moreover, I
assigned the Corrections Department to compile the watchlist of dangerous people
in accordance with the new law to prevent them from committing crime again,” the
justice minister said.

 

A beer delivery truck overturned on the Rangsit – Pathum Thani Road in central
Thailand last night, strewing 30 tonnes of booze across the busy road. A forklift
was needed to clear up the mounds of bottles and broken glass.
Around 61,440 small bottles of a leopard-themed beer, which shall not be named
due to Thailand’s archaic and strictly enforced anti-alcohol-advertising laws, were
sadly obliterated when the 22-wheel truck lost control and turned over in Pathum
Thani province’s Mueang district. The 28 year old truck driver Kittipong Pansuk
and his 4 year old son Chakkrit Pansuk were both injured in the crash.
Volunteers from the Ruam Katanyu Foundation took them for treatment
at Krung Siam St. Carlos Hospital. Officers from Pak Klong Rangsit
Police Station were called to the scene to record evidence. Police said that once
the driver has recovered, he will be taken to the station for further questioning.
He may face prosecution or be liable to pay a fine
for causing traffic jams or damage to the road, said police.
Thai media did not estimate the damages lost in beer.
Meanwhile, Posting photos of alcohol logos online is illegal in Thailand under
Section 32 of the Alcohol Beverage Control Act 2008…
No person shall advertise or display, directly or indirectly, the name or trademark
of any alcoholic beverage in a manner showing the properties thereof or inducing
another person to drink.
Advertisements or public relations provided by the manufacturer of any kind of
alcoholic beverage shall only be made for giving information thereof or giving
social creative knowledge without displaying any illustration of such alcoholic
beverage or its package, except for the display of a symbol of a such alcoholic
beverage or that of its manufacturer as prescribed by the Ministerial Regulation.
The provisions of paragraph one and paragraph two shall not apply to any
advertisement broadcast from outside of the Kingdom.
Sharing pictures of alcohol logos on social media in Thailand is punishable by up
to one year imprisonment, a fine between 50,000 to 500,000 baht, or both.

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