Connect with us

Hua Hin

Leatherback turtles face extinction

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Leatherback turtles face extinction | The Thaiger

by Pratch Rujivanarom

It may be too late to save leatherback turtles from extinction in Thailand’s seas, as a legal deadlock prevents a conservation status upgrade to protect this critically endangered turtle species and three other rare marine animals.

Wildlife conservationists are warning that the slow pace of stepping up the conservation of the leatherback turtle, whale shark, Bryde’s whale and Omura’s whale to preserved status would eventually cause the inevitable extinction of leatherback turtles in Thailand. They were speaking at a public seminar by the Sarakadee Magazine and Seub Nakhasathien Foundation yesterday.

The director of the Phuket Marine Biological Centre, Kongkiat Kittiwattanawong, said of the four endangered species, the fate of the leatherback turtles was now of most concern, as there had been no reports of finding new nests of the rare sea turtle species in Thailand since 2013 and its extinction in the wild was predicted to occur within the next few years.

Kongkiat said that the leatherback turtle was a protected wildlife species under the Wild Animal Reservation and Protection Act, which protected it from poaching and being in private possession, unless legally registered with the appropriate permission from the responsible agencies.

However, he said protected status was not enough to raise public awareness about preserving this critically endangered species of sea turtle and to prevent them becoming extinct from Thailand.

“Despite there not being much difference in conservation measures between protected wildlife and preserved wildlife, the public perception between these two categories is totally different, as people tend to give more concern to animals in the preserved wildlife list, because that is the status for nearly extinct animals,” he said.

He called for the conservation status of this turtle species to be stepped up urgently, bearing in mind its current precarious status in the wild, the fact there had been no new leatherback turtles’ nest found for more than four years and the increasing threat to their survival from dangers such as marine plastic waste.

“The categorising of Thailand’s wildlife conservation status of protected animals and preserved animals complies with the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List, as species listed as vulnerable are eligible to be listed as protected animals, while the animals with the IUCN status of endangered or higher can be included in preserved wildlife list,” Kongkiat added.

“The leatherback turtle is now listed as critically endangered by the IUCN and in Thailand its population is now less than one per cent of what it was six decades ago, while its nesting report ratio has also dropped from three nests per year 20 years ago to only 1.5 nests per year this decade.”

Earlier this month the nomination of four endangered marine animals to be included in the preserved wildlife list was turned down after the Council of State highlighted a legal deadlock in the Wild Animal Reservation and Protection Act.

This might result in rights violations of the private owners of leatherback turtle carcasses, if these four rare marine animals are successfully registered as preserved animals.

This is because every case of private possession of living preserved animals or their carcasses is illegal, while according to Fisheries Department, there were at least 12 registered private collectors of leatherback turtle carcasses.

Leatherback turtles face extinction | News by The Thaiger

STORY: The Nation



Read more headlines, reports & breaking news in Krabi. Or catch up on your Thailand news.

Thailand's fastest growing portal for news and information, in association with The Nation.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Bangkok

Top Five things to consider if you’re buying a condo in Thailand

The Thaiger

Published

on

Top Five things to consider if you’re buying a condo in Thailand | The Thaiger

Not quite a Top Ten but some good straight-talking about buying condominiums in Thailand from Desmond Hughes from Hughes Krupica

One of the most commonly read or spoken summary of foreign ownership of property in Thailand is along the lines of

“Foreigners can buy a foreign freehold condominium in their name”.

At this sentence, many foreign investors switch off, and assume that the rest of the detail provided by the author may be legal mumbo jumbo or a thinly veiled attempt to win their business.

In fact, there is quite a lot you should know about Thai condominiums, before you start property hunting. As my clients don’t generally spend their time reading legal journals and legislation unless they have to, I have set out a mixture of legal and practical matters below without much distinction:

1. Only 49% of the Registrable Area of a condominium can be sold to foreigners.

In Bangkok, this is not likely to have any impact on you. Most of the buyers and owners of condominiums in Bangkok are Thai nationals. Even in condominiums popular with foreigners, it is an uncommon phenomena that foreigners would ever outnumber Thais as owners in a building. You might ask why the rule even exists, but there is a fear and protectionism in many Asian countries, not just Thailand, to try and keep foreigners ‘controlled’ through numbers and perecentages.

In other places – Phuket; Pattaya; Koh Samui; Chiang Mai and Hua Hin particularly you should apply caution to ensuring that the correct ‘quota’ of foreign units is available to be sold to you on a freehold basis.

2. Banks often advertise they will give finance, even potentially to foreigners, but in the end – don’t

I speak from personal experience and from that of my clients. For my first condo investment in Bangkok, I had to take out a loan with HSBC which was then taken over by a Thai bank. My loan had to be in foreign currency, because in order to buy a foreign freehold condominium – you have to send foreign currency into Thailand from overseas to generate ‘foreign exchange transaction forms’ to register the title to a foreigner at the land office. This means a lot of hoops for a bank to jump through simply to provide a mortgage. Foreigners are also viewed as flight risks by Thai banks and they do not wish to spend their time chasing foreign assets. This all means that a very high percentage of the foreign buyer market is cash based, which is good for the stability of that part of the condo market.

If you are tempted to try and take out finance applications to banks, be aware that the banks are looking for you to have some business in Thailand; perhaps to be married to a Thai national who preferable from the bank’s perspective will have some degree of wealth for self-support; and that you have other assets in Thailand with a history of using and paying off credit such as credit cards.

3. There is an oversupply of condominiums in Bangkok at the moment and rental yields are traditionally low in terms of % compared to more expensive Asian neighbors – Hong Kong and Singapore, and further afield

A condo in a prime rentable area at a high investment price can remain rentable due to its extremely useful location and amenities. If such condo has a 24 hour supermarket in the basement of the retail area and dozens of restaurants, as a condo building I am thinking of does have such amenities, then it will remain rentable for some time if the property is maintained. However, another condo at the end of the same ‘Soi’ and post building and delivery could remain unrented after many months and even if the rent is cut to 50% of the market price. Don’t just take my word for the state of the market for condo rentals in Bangkok, ask the agents.

In addition to this, the authorities are taking a closer eye at tax declarations and ‘cracking down’ on undeclared taxes – not just personal income tax, but the ‘business tax’ of 12.5% for renting units out. This all adds to the costs of investing and renting in a condo, and you must calculate this into your budget and forecasts to avoid living in fantasy land about dream returns.

3. You won’t have any say in how the condominium is managed

Unless you buy up over half of the voting rights attached to units in the entire building, you will be a minority voice on issues like the raising of the common area fees; use of the ‘sinking fund’ – the fund to make capital repairs, changes to the rules and regulations and general maintenance decisions, even of some significance. Don’t imagine standing up at an co-owners meeting voicing your opinions and somehow making headway in ‘changing’ the direction of the management of a building. The way in which a building is managed boils down to how the developer has structured ownership, whether the developer retains many units and a large % of the voting rights or not, and whether the developer plans to self-manage or outsource management of the asset to a reputable or not-so-reputable management company.

If you don’t check the management plan then I can reference lots of analogous situations where you would take more care – if you buy a car, you should think if there are any decent repair centres nearby and at a reasonable price – Ferraris in Phuket aren’t currently easy to maintain, I would imagine, as a non-Ferrari owner and observer of the state and condition of the roads in that Province. You also wouldn’t, I hope, buy a smart phone without knowing you could have the phone service, fixed and various parts replaced on reasonably short notice. As a property is a far higher value of investment, a lot of investigation into the management plan is necessary.

4. Don’t Believe the Hype – It’s a Sequel

False Media, we don’t need it do we? If you see a glossy marketing brochure and are told that the developer ‘has to deliver on its promises by law’ – be wary. To take one example, I bought a condo under which a ‘private wine cellar area with personal secure wine bottle storage space’ would be provided to every buyer. Amazingly, without any shame at all, the famous developer constructed an unchilled cheap wooden cabinet with glass doors, no locks next to 4 sofa chairs in the open space corridor between a swimming pool and the gym. If you wanted to fry an egg on the ‘wine cabinet’ then that was highly likely to have been possible.

These kind of things are not all ‘horror stories’ – I actually got a decent condo notwithstanding the missing items. However, you will often have to compromise when in more highly regulated and supervised jurisdictions, you would not. Compromise is a very common work in Thai society and it applies to business and consumer purchases too.

5. Set up your ownership for easy re-sale

If you are buying a condo as a ‘foreigner’ and paying cash, then you can buy your condo through a foreign company, and sell the company later. This is only worth doing if the cost of setting up and maintaining the foreign company is reasonable and the company you set up is ‘saleable’ and attractive to others. You should not carry out this kind of structuring to ‘avoid tax’. However, you can set up this kind of structure, pay tax on the purchase, and subsequently deal with your company as you see fit, provided a buyer is willing to buy it. If such a company receives rental income, then even if it is foreign it is till liable to taxes as the use of the ‘immoveable property’ for generating revenue isn’t deemed to be ‘outside’ of Thailand, and that applies even if the company tries to contract for and receive the rent outside of Thailand.

Desmond Hughes has operated and owned 2 law firms in Asia in 14 years spanning Thailand; Vietnam; Indonesia with clients in all of Asia and other markets investing inwards into the region with his existing firm Hughes Krupica possessing a large market shares in its fields of expertise. 

Continue Reading

Hua Hin

Two killed in family road trip to Krabi

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Two killed in family road trip to Krabi | The Thaiger

The family was on its way from Nakhon Phanom to Krabi when the accident occurred at 8.30am on Phetkasem Road in Bang Saphan district.

40 year old Weera Prachi was killed behind the wheel. The impact hurled his 10 year old daughter, Jiraporn Prachi out of the car.

Weera’s wife Orapin Odthon and 13 year old son Danusorn Prachi were in the back seat, sustained injuries and were taken to hospital although their current condition is not known.

Relatives told police Weera was taking the family to visit Krabi. Police suspect he might have fallen asleep at the wheel.

SOURCE: The Thaiger | The Nation

Continue Reading

Hua Hin

Man charged over shooting death in Prachuap Khiri Khan, claims it was an accident

The Thaiger & The Nation

Published

on

Man charged over shooting death in Prachuap Khiri Khan, claims it was an accident | The Thaiger

A 38 year old Thai man has been arrested and charged over the alleged shooting death of a 9 year old boy and then burying his body in a forest area in Prachuap Khiri Khan’s Hua Hin district.

Third grader Chalermchai Jopratha from Ban Phraek Takhro was reported missing on March 10. He was found yesterday morning in a shallow grave covered with a large rock.

Local man Pramook Khosin was arrested and a hunting rifle and eight bullets seized, according to Nong Pluc superintendent Pol Colonel Chaikorn Sriladecho.

“He has been charged with murder, concealing a body and illegal possession of a hunting rifle and ammunition.”

Pramook told police that he was hunting in the hill area when he shot at the boy who he mistook as a hornbill. He says that when he realised he had shot and killed the boy he dug a shallow grave to hide the body and conceal the crime before returning to work at an ice-selling shop in Pran Buri district.

Chalermchai, one of five children, was a child Muay Thai fighter who joined boxing matches at local events to earn 500 to 1,000 baht prize money to help his poor family.

SOURCE: The Nation

Continue Reading

The Thaiger Newsletter

Keep up with all the day’s news. Subscribe here.

The latest news and information from Thailand.

* indicates required



ธนาธร แสดงจุดยืน พรรค ส.ส.อันดับหนึ่งต้องเป็นแกนนำตั้งรัฐบาล | The Thaiger
เลือกตั้ง 626 hours ago

ธนาธร แสดงจุดยืน พรรค ส.ส.อันดับหนึ่งต้องเป็นแกนนำตั้งรัฐบาล

เพื่อไทย ยืน 1 กวาด 137 ส.ส. ประกาศเดินหน้าจัดตั้งรัฐบาล | The Thaiger
เลือกตั้ง 6212 hours ago

เพื่อไทย ยืน 1 กวาด 137 ส.ส. ประกาศเดินหน้าจัดตั้งรัฐบาล

สรุปคำแถลงของ กกต. #เลือกตั้ง62 ส.ส. อย่างไม่เป็นทางการ [Live] | The Thaiger
เลือกตั้ง 6213 hours ago

สรุปคำแถลงของ กกต. #เลือกตั้ง62 ส.ส. อย่างไม่เป็นทางการ [Live]

เลือกตั้ง62 : เกาะติดรายงานสดหลังปิดหีบเลือกตั้ง [Live] | The Thaiger
เลือกตั้ง 621 day ago

เลือกตั้ง62 : เกาะติดรายงานสดหลังปิดหีบเลือกตั้ง [Live]

PABUK a tropical storm, not a typhoon | The Thaiger
Video & Podcasts3 months ago

PABUK a tropical storm, not a typhoon

Single Use Plastics. The BIG issue for Thai Environment Day. | The Thaiger
Video & Podcasts4 months ago

Single Use Plastics. The BIG issue for Thai Environment Day.

Annissa Flynn – Pro women’s World Flowboarding Champion | The Thaiger
Bangkok4 months ago

Annissa Flynn – Pro women’s World Flowboarding Champion

TEST DRIVE GOOLGE TRANSLATE ทดสอบไดรฟ์ GOOGLE TRANSLATE | The Thaiger
Video & Podcasts4 months ago

TEST DRIVE GOOLGE TRANSLATE ทดสอบไดรฟ์ GOOGLE TRANSLATE

Phuket’s Tsuanmi Alert System | The Thaiger
Video & Podcasts4 months ago

Phuket’s Tsuanmi Alert System

Canadians will be able to use consular services at the Australian Consulate in Phuket | The Thaiger
News6 months ago

Canadians will be able to use consular services at the Australian Consulate in Phuket

NO Plastic Bag! @ Central Phuket | The Thaiger
Other News7 months ago

NO Plastic Bag! @ Central Phuket

Why did so many Chinese passengers die in the boat sinking? | The Thaiger
News7 months ago

Why did so many Chinese passengers die in the boat sinking?

Blue Tree Phuket, a world-class HUGE waterpark | The Thaiger
Phuket7 months ago

Blue Tree Phuket, a world-class HUGE waterpark

The new Central Phuket: Interview with Central Pattana’s Pakorn Partanapat | The Thaiger
Video & Podcasts7 months ago

The new Central Phuket: Interview with Central Pattana’s Pakorn Partanapat

The battle of Phuket’s boat shows | The Thaiger
Phuket7 months ago

The battle of Phuket’s boat shows

Trending