Connect with us

World

Phuket Gazette World News: Singapore police probe ‘unnatural’ death of American CEO of bitcoin trader

Legacy Phuket Gazette

Published 

 on 

PHUKET: Singapore police are investigating what they have called the “unnatural” death of a 28-year-old American woman who ran a small exchange that traded virtual currencies, including bitcoins, from the Asian city state.

Autumn Radtke, chief executive of First Meta Pte Ltd, was found dead at her Singapore home on February 26.

“The police are investigating the unnatural death,” a police spokesman said late on Wednesday when asked about media reports Radtke had been found dead last week. He gave no more details.

First Meta said in a statement on its website that its team was shocked and saddened by the tragic loss of its CEO.

“Our deepest condolences go out to her family, friends and loved ones. Autumn was an inspiration to all of us and she will be sorely missed.”

Before heading up First Meta in 2012, Radtke had business development roles at tech startups Xfire and Geodelic Systems, according to information on her LinkedIn profile.

First Meta runs an exchange for virtual currencies and assets. It initially functioned as an online trade platform for the currency used in online world Second Life, and then expanded to other games. Last year it allowed users to sell bitcoins for dollars. That feature is not currently available.

Mt. Gox bitcoin debacle: huge heist or sloppy glitch?

The death of Ms Radtke came just two days before close to half a billion dollars worth of the bitcoin virtual currency disappearing from an exchange in Tokyo in what is either the bank heist of the century or a sloppy glitch, or a combination of the two.

Mark Karpeles, the 28-year-old French CEO of Mt. Gox, which once handled around 80 percent of the world’s bitcoin trades, filed for bankruptcy at a Tokyo District Court last Friday. His lawyer said that nearly all the bitcoins in the exchange’s possession – 850,000 of them – were missing. Karpeles blamed hackers.

At current bitcoin rates on other exchanges, that would mean $473 million (282 million pounds) is lost – around 7 percent of all bitcoins minted.

“If the theft is true,” said Campbell Harvey, a professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, “it’s the biggest bank heist in history,” aside from when Saddam Hussein ordered his son to withdraw $1 billion from Iraq’s central bank in 2003.

How this happened remains a mystery. But most observers say Mt. Gox’s laxness played a key role in the debacle.

“When I first signed up to it, it was clearly not fit to be a financial services company,” said Jon Rushman, who researches and lectures about bitcoin at England’s University of Warwick. But things got better, he said: “It has been a process of learn-by-doing that they have discovered all sorts of things they should be doing, but were not.”

No official explanation has been forthcoming beyond blaming hackers and weaknesses in Mt. Gox’s system.

A document circulating on the internet that purports to be a crisis strategy paper prepared on behalf of Mt. Gox blamed the hole on a “malleability-related theft which went unnoticed for several years.” Mt. Gox has not confirmed the authenticity of the document.

The phrase, says Ethan Heilman, a research fellow at Boston University, refers to a bug in the bitcoin process whereby someone could trick Mt. Gox into thinking a transaction had failed – and therefore keep repeating it.

This, say Heilman and others, could explain the disappearance of the money – even though the bug has been known for a while, and has been fixed on other exchanges.

Stretching credibility

More problematic is another part of the document’s purported explanation.

Usually bitcoins’ private keys – something similar to a personal bank PIN code – are stored offline, where hackers can’t get them. This ‘cold storage’ is unconnected to the online part – the hot wallet. The document says “the cold storage has been wiped out due to a leak in the hot wallet” – a statement experts say doesn’t make sense.

If true, this suggests the vast majority of Mt. Gox’s bitcoin deposits were leaking out without anyone noticing.

This stretches credibility, says Anthony Hope, who heads compliance for Hong Kong-based bitcoin company MatrixVision. Once Mt. Gox was aware of the malleability bug, why didn’t they check their cold storage? “This is like someone saying that you put your wine in a cellar to keep cool, then someone tells you that a particular vintage had loose corks,” he said. “You’d presumably go into the cellar to ensure your bottles were not affected.”

At Singapore-based Coin Of Sale, Tomas Forgac said: “If this was long-term leakage which went unnoticed, it shows an unbelievable level of incompetence.”

Thousands of socks

If the bitcoins have been stolen, the thief or thieves would have several options to convert them into cash, said Boston University’s Heilman.

They could have used a “mixing service” to mix one group of funds with those of other people. They could also have used a service like localbitcoins.com to trade bitcoins for cash in person. “There are many possibilities for cashing out, although fencing this many bitcoins would be difficult,” he said.

To do that, says Charles McFarland, a research engineer at online security company McAfee, the thief or thieves would have to conceal their tracks by spreading the bitcoin around prior to laundering it into cash.

Trying to do so from a single bitcoin wallet would have been like stuffing thousands of socks in a dryer while everyone else is throwing in only a single pair.

“For this reason it’s a safe bet to say the stolen bitcoins are most likely paid out in numerous wallets so each transaction can hide among the trees,” McFarland said. That, he said, would make it “expensive, if not impossible, to track.”

Knowing whether this was theft or negligence, or both, will take time, and may never happen. U.S. federal prosecutors have subpoenaed Mt. Gox – and other bitcoin businesses – to seek information on a spate of disruptive cyber attacks.

But bitcoin is an unregulated industry, requires no technical audits or risk management procedures – and offers few ways of prosecuting those who might have acted illegally, says Zennon Kapron, who runs a finance consultancy in Shanghai.

“The unfortunate part is that we may never know exactly how this happened,” he says.

— Phuket Gazette Editors

 

Want more Thailand news from the Thaiger family?

📱 Download our app on Android or iOS for instant updates on your mobile
📝️ Join the conversation on Thaiger Talk - discuss news & life in our Thailand forums
📧 Subscribe to our daily email newsletter
👍 Like/Follow us on Facebook
🔔 Subscribe to or Join our YouTube channel for daily video updates

image

Join the conversation and have your say on Thailand news published on The Thaiger.

Thaiger Talk is our new Thaiger Community where you can join the discussion on everything happening in Thailand right now.

Please note that articles are not posted to the forum instantly and can take up to 20 min before being visible. Click for more information and the Thaiger Talk Guidelines.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Archiving articles from the Phuket Gazette circa 1998 - 2017. View the Phuket Gazette online archive and Digital Gazette PDF Prints.

Follow Thaiger by email:

Coronavirus (Covid-19)5 hours ago

AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccines to be donated to Thailand from Japan

Bangkok5 hours ago

Bangkok police warn that protests planned for Thursday break the Emergency Decree

Thailand5 hours ago

Thailand News Today | Hotel occupancy, Phuket beaches hit with tar balls, doctor ‘warning’ | June 21

Phuket Sandbox July 1st

days
hours
minutes
seconds

Thaiger is getting behind local businesses for the restart of tourism in July - up to 50% discounts across all advertising packages in June!

Thailand6 hours ago

Pattaya residents complain of sinkholes in road, couple sustains injuries

Insurgency6 hours ago

2 suspected insurgents killed in gunfire exchange with police-military team

Best of6 hours ago

Top 8 Things to do in Hua Hin

Thailand7 hours ago

Army raids a house, arrests 53 as part of alleged gambling operation

Best of7 hours ago

Top 5 Insurance Companies for Expats in Thailand

Thailand7 hours ago

Thailand abstains from vote on UN resolution condemning Myanmar violence

Leisure7 hours ago

Top 5 Rooftop Bars in Bangkok

Best of7 hours ago

Top 5 Shabu-Shabu Restaurants in Bangkok

Indonesia7 hours ago

Indonesia approaches 2 million Covid cases

Thailand8 hours ago

Monday Covid Update: 3,175 new cases; infections rise in the Deep South

Pollution8 hours ago

Oil slick and ‘tar balls’ wash up on Phuket’s beaches – what caused it?

Best of8 hours ago

Top 5 Ice Cream Shops in Bangkok

Thailand4 months ago

Thailand News Today | Thai Airways in rehab, All go for Songkran | March 4

Tourism4 months ago

Phuket’s nightlife. Yes, bars and clubs are still open | VIDEO

Phuket4 months ago

Thailand News Today | Covid passport talks, Thai Airways heads to court | March 2

Tourism4 months ago

Phuket Thai food treats you need to try | VIDEO

Thailand4 months ago

Thailand News Today | Bars, pubs and restaurants ‘sort of’ back to normal | Feb 23

Tourism4 months ago

In search of Cat & Dog Cafés in Phuket Town | VIDEO

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Gambling crackdown, Seafood market to reopen, Vlogger challenge | Jan 21

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Covid testing for visas, Business impact, Vaccine approval | January 19

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Weekend Bangkok bombs, Thailand fires, Covid update | January 18

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Stray car on runway, Indonesian quake, 300 baht tourist fee | January 15

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Governor off respirator, sex-trafficking arrest, condo prices falling | January 14

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Chinese vaccine, Thailand ‘drug hub’, Covid update | January 13

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Bangkok may ease restrictions, Phuket bar curfew, Vaccine roll out | January 12

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Covid latest, Cockfights closed down, Bryde’s Whale beached | January 11

Thailand5 months ago

Thailand News Today | Southern floods, Face mask fines, Thai Air Asia woes | January 8

Trending