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What’s happening in Myanmar? The background noise that led to an Army coup

The Thaiger

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What’s happening in Myanmar? The background noise that led to an Army coup | The Thaiger

Myanmar’s military has assumed control of the country in a coup in the early hours of Monday, February 1st.

It wasn’t a total surprise as some of the Military’s leaders had been huffing and puffing out load about the November general elections when Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD party won all but 33 seats of the 476 seat national parliament. A landslide by any measure.

State counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate, and several other NLD leaders were arrested in early-morning raids, conducted with military precision. It was a bloodless coup by the generals complained of election fraud in the November 8 election. They cited alleged evidence in their reasons for the coup. None has been presented to the Burmese people at this time.

The Army say they will take control for 12 months under emergency powers granted to them in the county’s constitution… a constitution cobbled together by the generals to ensure they never really lost a grip on the control levers.

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Robert Bunker

    Wednesday, February 3, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    Where’s the story??

  2. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    Wednesday, February 3, 2021 at 4:01 pm

    Chief Tyrant Despot Dictator number one, P.M. Prayut Cha Cha Cha, will have seen this and ordering his Elves: There do you see what happens when you give the peasants an election? They show no gratitude whatsoever.
    That’s it, no election for my peasants.

    • Avatar

      Issan John

      Wednesday, February 3, 2021 at 8:14 pm

      Not defending him, but I think you’re probably a bit nearer to “Chief Tyrant Despot Dictator number one” in Phnom Penh than we are here, Toby.

  3. Avatar

    crispy

    Wednesday, February 3, 2021 at 9:14 pm

    The Myanmar story is imho not a story about a military that takes over, ejecting a democratically elected government frim power against the wishes of the people.

    No. I don’t think so.

    It is a story about a military protecting its rackets. Yes.

    But it is also interesting how much support they have at home and that the opposition is mainly Western inspired.

    Consider instead Indian (by culture) Muslims invading a Chinese Buddhist country, the West pressuring the elected government to give them citizenship, the elected government bowing under the pressure and starting to take back the illegals its military had thrown out, and the military finally saying it’s had enough.

    The military were very heavily defeated in November’s election. True. That means people want democratically elected leaders that respond to their wishes… Which includes a govt not responding to the wishes of foreign powers, at their expense.

    The military were defeated at the ballot box because no-one thinks military can set goals and act politically – the military can only plan and implement but they cannot set goals. True. They are politically minded in that sense.

    The people of Myanmar are behind the military because they don’t want Muslim Indians pouring into their country from Chittagong and East Bengal.

    Also, consider relations between India and China.

    And relations between The West and China.

    • Avatar

      Ynwaps

      Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 9:12 am

      Too many humans that better figure out how to work together or are left behind.

  4. Avatar

    crispy

    Wednesday, February 3, 2021 at 9:16 pm

    THE MILITARY DEFEND THE COUNTRY AGAINST IBCADERS
    .
    @J Cullip

    The Myanmar story is not a story about a military that takes over, ejecting a democratically elected government against the wishes of the people.

    No.

    It is a story about Indian (by culture) Muslims invading a Chinese Buddhist country, the West pressuring the elected government to give them citizenship, the elected government bowing under the pressure and starting to take back the illegals its military had thrown out, and the military finally saying it’s had enough.

    The military were very heavily defeated in November’s election. That means people want democratically elected leaders that respond to their wishes and not the wishes of foreign powers at their expense.

    The military were defeated at the ballot box because no-one thinks military can set goals and act politically – the military can only plan and implement but they cannot set goals.

    The people of Myanmar are 100% behind the military because they don’t want Muslim Indians pouring into their country from Chittagong and East Bengal.

    A few of “the rohingya” trace their ancestry to Muslims who lived in Arakan in the 15th and 16h centuries, muslim because the arab traders conversions along the silk road, but most Rohingyas arrived in the 19th and 20th centuries, as Arakine was a vast and fertile land with few inhabitants. British colonialists brought them in, to till the land and create wealth, which they did, though they are Bengali Muslims from Chittagong for the most part.

    As this area is Buddhist Burma, the few locals greatly resented the entry of these people – they are Bengalis (Indian culturally, not Chinese) and Muslim. They have no rights as Burmese citizens and the Burmese military repeatedly try to chase the back to East Bengal saying they are illegal immigrants. Suu Kyi takes the same line, in her heart, but western powers and NGOs accuse her of apartheid, racism, ethnic cleansing etc.

    Bear in mind that Bangladesh is a recent creation from Pakistan, itself created to separate Hindu and Muslim, forever fighting.

    So this is Buddhist military ethnic cleansing of Indian Muslim illegal immigrants into their land.

    Who is right?

  5. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 11:00 am

    If the Burmese had stayed British after the war, Burmese would have had the option of living in the east end of London on the 14th floor of Tower Hamlets now.
    They could have lived out the rest of their live on benefits, free health care, and a pension when they were old enough.
    But they wanted their independence, and look what resulted?
    Tragic!

    • Avatar

      Crispy

      Sunday, February 7, 2021 at 4:07 am

      They could have been another singapore

  6. Avatar

    CJ Hinke

    Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 12:41 pm

    The real story is the IMF gave a $360mil cash handout to Myanmar for coronavirus relief just days before the coup. The generals were just waiting to pounce. Lots of khaki pockets to fill.

  7. Avatar

    jesus monroe

    Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Whats taking them so long to do a Hong Kong Thailand move…….Nothing like a few bullets whizzing around to quell all……..poor bastards

  8. Avatar

    Richard

    Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 3:31 pm

    Guess what folks, the military coup in Myanmar or as we know it Burma is because of fraudulent election, and just guess the voting system.
    DOMINION

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Myanmar

38 people die “bloodiest day” since Myanmar coup – United Nations

Caitlin Ashworth

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38 people die “bloodiest day” since Myanmar coup – United Nations | The Thaiger
Anti-coup protest in Myanmar on February 14 / Photo by Htin Linn Aye via Wikimedia Commons

38 people died during Myanmar’s anti-coup protests yesterday in what the United Nations is calling the “bloodiest day” in the country since the February 1 military takeover. UN special envoy for Myanmar Christine Schraner Burgener said the death toll is “shocking” and that the situation in the Southeast Asian country could lead to a “real war.”

Since last month’s coup, more than 50 people have died while many others have been wounded in protests against military rule. Witnesses say police and soldiers have opened fire with little warning. In a virtual briefing, the UN envoy said experts believe the Burmese police are using 9mm sub-machine guns to fire shots at civilians.

“I saw today very disturbing video clips. One was police beating a volunteer medical crew. They were not armed… Another video clip showed a protester was taken away from police and they shot him from very near, maybe one metre. He didn’t resist his arrest and it seems he died on the street.”

Burmese troops seized power of the civilian government last month, citing what they say was a fraudulent election, although the election commission said the vote was fair. A number of civilian politicians were arrested including democratic leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who had won the November election for state counsellor in a landslide.

Christine says more than 1,200 people are now under detention and many do not know where their loved ones are.

SOURCE: UN News | Aljazeera

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Myanmar

UN condemns violence in Myanmar as at least 18 killed in clashes with authorities

Maya Taylor

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UN condemns violence in Myanmar as at least 18 killed in clashes with authorities | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Wikimedia

The UN human rights office (OHCHR) has called for an immediate end to the use of force in Myanmar, after at least 18 people were killed in violent clashes yesterday. Those opposed to the February 1 military coup have been taking to the streets, with police and military forces opening fire in what was the deadliest day so far.

A spokesperson for UN Secretary-General António Guterres says he condemned the use of force against protesters, which resulted in at least 30 people being injured and 18 killed.

“He is deeply disturbed by the increase in deaths and serious injuries. The use of lethal force against peaceful protestors and arbitrary arrests are unacceptable.”

The Burmese army claims that the parliamentary elections, in which State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi was elected, were fraudulent. She was arrested on February 1, along with several members of her administration. According to media reports, she is due to appear in court today.

The UN Ambassador to Myanmar also condemned the military coup in a General Assembly address in New York and called on the international community to act. He has since been fired.

OHCHR spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani has also condemned the violence, saying the Burmese people have the right to peacefully protest in the name of democracy.

“The people of Myanmar have the right to assemble peacefully and demand the restoration of democracy. These fundamental rights must be respected by the military and police, not met with violent and bloody repression.”

After clashes between protesters and the military and police, deaths have been reported in Yangon, Dawei, Mandalay, Myiek, Bago and Pokokku, with Shamdasani claiming tear gas and stun grenades were used against protesters. She has slammed the use of force and condemned the arrest and detention of activists.

“Use of lethal force against non-violent demonstrators is never justifiable under international human rights norms. Since the beginning of the coup d’état, the police and security forces have targeted an ever-increasing number of opposition voices and demonstrators by arresting political officials, activists, civil society members, journalists, and medical professionals.

“Today alone, police have detained at least 85 medical professionals and students, as well as 7 journalists, who were present at the demonstrations. Over 1,000 individuals have been arbitrarily arrested and detained in the last month – some of whom remain unaccounted for – mostly without any form of due process, simply for exercising their human rights to freedom of opinion, expression and peaceful assembly.”

The military coup of February 1 came as Myanmar was edging towards democracy after years of army rule. It has been condemned by countries around the world and brought hundreds of thousands of Burmese onto the streets to demand an end to military rule and the restoration of democracy.

SOURCE: UN News

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Politics

Myanmar’s representative to UN urges strong action against military after increasing violence against protesters

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Myanmar’s representative to UN urges strong action against military after increasing violence against protesters | The Thaiger

A representative to the UN for Myanmar is urging the “strongest action to be used against the military after it has used increasing amounts of violence against anti‐coup protesters. The latest round in violence occurred as riot police violently broke up peaceful protesters, arresting over 100 people in 3 major Myanmar cities.

Kyaw Moe Tun made the appeal to the UN General Assembly in New York asking for the international community to end the junta’s rule in his country, while displaying the 3 finger salute that has been adopted from the Hunger Games as a symbol of resistance from anti‐coup supporters.

“We need… the strongest possible action from the international community to immediately end the military coup, to stop oppressing the innocent people, to return the state power to the people, and to restore the democracy.”

Former UN ambassador for the US, Samantha Power, also tweeted her support for the movement.

“It’s impossible to overstate the risks that #Myanmar UN ambassador Kyaw Moe Tun just took in the UN General Assembly.”

UN envoy to Myanmar, Christine Schraner Burgener, also agreed saying the use of lethal force against protesters was “unacceptable.”

So far, at least 5 people have been killed since the overthrow, which has seen police open fire on protesters. Thandar Cho, a street food vendor, says she saw police point their guns in a threatening manner towards apartments during the rallies.

“They beat young protesters with rods and cursed them while doing it.”

A Japanese journalist, Yuki Kitazumi, was also allegedly arrested according to a Facebook post by his assistant, Linn Nyan Htun, during the crackdown.

He “was beaten on the head by baton but he was wearing a helmet.”

The military has justified the coup by alleging that the 2020 November democratic elections, which saw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy elected by landslide, were fraudulent.

Suu Kyi was arrested, along with other leaders, and is now facing 2 charges of illegally posessing walkie-talkies in her home and for breaking Covid-19 rules. But her lawyer, Khing Maung Zaw, is concerned as he has still not made contact with her, saying it is dire to get her permission for him to represent her in court.

“It’s very important to get her signed power of attorney before the hearing starts on March 1 because we won’t be allowed to act as her defence counsels if we cannot file (it).”

“Then Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will be rid of her right of fair trial without a legal counsel.”

SOURCE: The Phuket News

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