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Major international retailers banning monkey-picked coconuts – VIDEO

Jack Burton

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Allegations of animal abuse are prompting major Western retailers to pull Thai coconut products from their shelves, amid accusations that the coconuts are picked by monkeys treated inhumanely. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals claim monkeys are snatched from the wild and trained to pick up to 1,000 coconuts a day. The animal rights group says pigtailed macaques are treated like “coconut-picking machines”.

PETA claims monkeys are used by farms supplying 2 of Thailand’s best known coconut milk brands: Aroy-D and Chaokoh, which are exported to many countries, including Europe and the US.

“Following PETA Asia’s investigation, more than 15,000 stores will no longer purchase these brands’ products, with the majority also no longer buying any coconut products sourced from Thailand monkey labour.”

The BBC reports that in the UK, major retailers Waitrose, Ocado, Co-op and Boots are pledging to stop selling some coconut products from Thailand.

“Our own-brand coconut milk and coconut water does not use monkey labour in its production and we don’t sell any of the branded products identified by Peta. We don’t tolerate these practices and would remove any product from sale that is known to have used monkey labour during its production.”

The Morrisons chain said it has already removed products made with monkey-picked coconuts from its shelves. Sainsbury’s, the UK’s second largest grocery chain, told the BBC…

“We are actively reviewing our ranges and investigating this complex issue with our suppliers.”

A PETA statement says it has found 8 farms in Thailand where monkeys are forced to pick coconuts for export around the world. Male monkeys are reportedly able to pick up to 1,000 coconuts a day; it’s thought that a human can pick about 80.

“Other coconut-growing regions, including Brazil, Colombia and Hawaii, harvest coconuts using humane methods such as tractor-mounted hydraulic elevators, willing human treeclimbers, rope or platform systems, ladders, or they simply plant dwarf coconut trees.”

The group says it’s also discovered “monkey schools,” where the animals are trained to pick fruit, as well as ride bikes or play basketball to entertain tourists.

“The animals at these facilities, many of whom are illegally captured as babies, displayed stereotypic behaviour indicative of extreme stress. Monkeys were chained to old tyres or confined to cages that were barely large enough for them to turn around in.”

“One monkey in a cage on a lorry (truck) bed was seen frantically shaking the cage bars in a futile attempt to escape, and a screaming monkey on a rope desperately tried to run away from a handler.”

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Glenn

    Saturday, July 4, 2020 at 5:08 pm

    seriously???

    To all the coconut farmers (of that’s the correct definition), just remember your had has a thumb and four fingers, and extending the longest middle one while making a fist signifies a firm statement. I would encourage all the coconut farmers to make a firm statement to any and all who feel the need to complain about monkeys picking coconuts. Next think you know you’ll be told to pay them a minimum wage and benefits if you remain quiet.

    • Avatar

      Alex

      Saturday, July 4, 2020 at 6:09 pm

      People should make a firm statement against this form of animal cruelty and abuse! Or did you skip that part that this is about Animal Cruelty! I don’t think you actually understood the meaning of this article, let alone the message it holds and the visible evidence which is clearly portrayed! You definitely got your priorities all twisted when it comes to animal abuse! You are standing on the wrong side of the fence! It seems to me you don’t give a damn about animal welfare regarding your comment, which clearly shows your total lack of empathy and disregarding the fear, anxiety, abuse and cruelty these animals are being subjected to! You consider yourself humane? You’re anything but humane! It’s called, Inhumane!

  2. Avatar

    gosport

    Saturday, July 4, 2020 at 5:44 pm

    Next time, the Western retailers will not sell imported vegetables because vegetables don’t drink enough water during cultivation.

  3. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    Saturday, July 4, 2020 at 5:55 pm

    These monkeys need a Trade Union.
    Yes well, first elephant torture is exposed, now it is monkeys.
    And I hear Cambodians are enslaved on Thai fishing boats.
    We begin to see the reality behind the smiling Thai.

    • Avatar

      Alex

      Tuesday, July 7, 2020 at 6:58 pm

      It’s not the first elephant torture that was exposed! These atrocities go way back longer! Do your research!

  4. Avatar

    Satang

    Sunday, July 5, 2020 at 9:35 am

    The monkeys get paid
    and who else is going to pick to coconuts you white travellers will have to climb it yourself to get a refreshing coconut drink on your wonderful holiday.
    And why is this the problem now its been happening for many years why now… so the people complaining you feel guilty.
    lets turn back time….how many white travellers took photos with tigers how many travellers ride elephants how many clapped while a Thai person put there head into a crocodiles mouths.You were entertained.
    And you know how much these monkeys and the people that train them to pick coconuts make….
    have you not seen the news of monkeys overrunning a small town there overpopulated.
    what are pigs used for…what are cows used for what chickens used for …….really inhumane
    maybe if you stop those animals from being killed then you can stop the monkeys

  5. Avatar

    YUI

    Tuesday, July 7, 2020 at 1:29 pm

    My comment lost

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Jack Burton is an American writer, broadcaster, linguist and journalist who has lived in Asia since 1987. A native of the state of Georgia, he attended the The University of Georgia's Henry Grady School of Journalism, which hands out journalism's prestigious Peabody Awards. His works have appeared in The China Post, The South China Morning Post, The International Herald Tribune and many magazines throughout Asia and the world. He is fluent in Mandarin and has appeared on television and radio for decades in Taiwan, Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau.

Business

The social media giants in battle with ‘old’ media and world governments | VIDEO

The Thaiger

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The social media giants in battle with ‘old’ media and world governments | VIDEO | The Thaiger

“The rules signal greater willingness by countries around the world to rein in big tech firms such as Google, Facebook and Twitter that the governments fear have become too powerful with little accountability.”

India has issued strict new rules for Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms just weeks after the Indian government attempted to pressure Twitter to take down social media accounts it deemed, well, anti social.

The rules require any social media company to create three roles within India… a “compliance officer” who ensures they follow local laws; a “grievance officer” who addresses complaints from Indian social media users; and a “contact person” who can actually be contacted by lawyers and other aggrieved Indian parties… 24/7.

The companies are also being made to publish a compliance report each month with details about how many complaints they’ve received and the action they took.

They’ll also be required to remove ‘some’ types of content including “full or partial nudity,” any “sexual act” or “impersonations including morphed images”

The democratisation of the news model, with social media as its catalyst, will continue to baffle traditional media and governments who used to enjoy a level of control over what stories get told.

The battles of Google and Facebook, with the governments of India and Australia will be followed in plenty of other countries as well.

At the root of all discussions will be the difference between what governments THINK social media is all about and the reality about how quickly the media landscape has changed. You’ll get to read about it first, on a social media platform… probably on the screen you’re watching this news story right now.

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Thailand

Long Buddhist holiday to see over 40 percent reduction in domestic tourism

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Long Buddhist holiday to see over 40 percent reduction in domestic tourism | The Thaiger

The long Buddhist festival holiday, which starts today, is set to see over a 40% reduction in domestic tourism. The Tourism and Transport Authority of Thailand has made the estimation which tallies around 1.09 million domestic trips, a number that is down 44% from last year’s Makha Bucha Day.

The 2nd wave of the Covid pandemicthis year has made potential tourists cautious about spending money, with the holiday forecasted to yield 3.9 billion baht. That number is 38% lower than the same period last year. Hotel occupancy rates are also expected to only be 50% of last year’s tally on average.

Other venues that are normally open for tourists on this holiday, such as the ancient Buddha’s footprint at Khao Khitchakut in Chanthaburi, have been closed out of fears for Covid spreading through mass gatherings. As one of the country’s top 10 religious events, it is indicative of how the 2nd wave has taken a toll on the country’s tourism. The event’s closing is attributed to the forecasted 74% drop in trips to Thailand’s northeastern region, otherwise known as Isaan. And, if there are less tourists, then there is less revenue. The cancellation is expected to decrease expenditures by 68% on average.

Meanwhile, the 2nd wave is also affecting airlines as Thai AirAsia has reported only 9.49 million passengers with an average load factor of 75% for 2020, posting a net loss of 4.76 billion baht with a total revenue of 16.3 billion baht.

Thai VietJet’s marketing manager says before the 2nd wave hit late last year, the airline was on the upswing, operating 120 domestic flights per day. Recently, top economic leaders have warned that Thailand’s tourism industry will fallout soon if it is not revived. The 60 plus year industry is in dire trouble with slow vaccine rollouts, country travel restrictions, and virus variants all being major factors in Thailand’s slow reopening of tourism.

With the vaccine set to be issued to tourism hotspots first, PM Prayut has stated that the government is mulling whether to allow tourists to skip quarantine requirements if they can show that they have received the Covid vaccine.

SOURCE: The Phuket News

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Economy

Thailand’s passenger car sales drop by over 44% year-on-year

Maya Taylor

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Thailand’s passenger car sales drop by over 44% year-on-year | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Connor Williams on Unsplash

Thailand’s domestic car sales dropped by over 21% last month, with passenger car sales plummeting by over 44% year-on-year. The Bangkok Post reports that the resurgence of the Covid-19 virus late last year has affected consumer confidence and buying power. The sale of commercial vehicles is also down by 5.4% year-on-year.

Surasak Suthongwan from Toyota Motor Thailand, says people are worried about the second outbreak’s impact on employment prospects and the economy as a whole, which is putting them off buying cars. He says that the automotive sector is still trying to recover from the effects of the original outbreak of the virus and that other sectors, such as the tourism industry, are at a standstill.

“Those factors caused domestic car sales to drop and the company is closely monitoring the economic situation and the pandemic.”

Toyota has a 32.2% share of the domestic market and domestic sales this month are also expected to be affected by the ongoing crisis. However, the automotive firm says it expects the government’s stimulus campaigns will help the economy and give consumer spending a boost.

SOURCE: Bangkok Post

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