Air PollutionChiang MaiChiang RaiEnvironment

PM to tackle Northern Thailand’s seasonal haze… again

FILE PHOTO

The Thai prime minister says he’s working on a plan to tackle Northern Thailand’s seasonal haze problem by cutting back manmade bushfires known to largely contribute to the air pollution. The issue has been broadly covered in Thai and foreign media for years, and been followed up with ministerial visits, promises, and little else.

PM Prayut Chan-o-cha spoke with governors of 17 northern provinces affected by seasonal haze, saying that he plans to supply villagers and local organisations with equipment, but reports did not go into much detail about what tools locals would get. He says authorities and state agencies need to step in to help combat the haze problem, suggesting that provincial governors head the local fight against wildfires.

“It’s important to eradicate the root cause of wildfires that result from villagers’ way of life… Even more farming space should be provided to farmers who need it to protect natural resources from being destroyed.”

Prayut added that it’s important for state agencies to collaborate on the firefighting effort and said members of the public can help raise awareness about wildfires.

The annual haze/smoke/air pollution problem is not just a Thai issue with the neighbouring countries, particularly Myanmar, causing their fair share of the illegal plantation fires, as shown in sharp detail in the satellite images.

Read The Thaiger’s take on the annual ‘smoke’ problem HERE.

SOURCE: Chiang Rai Times

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. I heard (correct me if I’m wrong) that a large part of the problem is sugar cane farmers burning before harvesting because it’s cheaper for some reason. If that’s the case, wouldn’t it be very easy to fine the processing plants if they accept burnt cane? One guard on the gate would cover a large area. Mind you, in Thailand more likely you would have one very rich guard!

  2. Apportion the blame to local government and Myanmar, that way he doesn’t need to do anything himself as it’s not his fault.
    Drones, efficient Police and huge fines would do the job, it’s not Rocket Science

  3. I really wish that writers would retire the word “haze” with regards to northern Thailand’s toxic air. “Haze” minimizes the gravity of the problem: makes it sound more like a foggy sunrise on the coast instead of PM 2.5 levels of between 200-800 that is literally killing people in numbers far worst then COVID-19.

    1. I agree, but you are asking for honesty in this story. Honesty would suggest doing something about it to help the citizens. Governments today are rarely honest or interested the the health of its citizens.

  4. Why is it happening now and not years ago?
    Maybe it is exhaust from motor vehicles. There are many more than years ago.
    If that is the case make it the law all motors, including industrial motors, are fitted with catalytic converters.

    1. The dickhead been saying that for years. Nothing will change except the size of his bank roll. And no, its not seasonal haze. It’s smoke, toxic air, hazardous aqi levels, pollution. You and your crony gov will never do a damn thing about it. Quit sweet talking the public

  5. I agree, but you are asking for honesty in this story. Honesty would suggest doing something about it to help the citizens. Governments today are rarely honest or interested the the health of its citizens.

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Caitlin Ashworth

Caitlin Ashworth is a writer from the United States who has lived in Thailand since 2018. She graduated from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and media studies in 2016. She was a reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette In Massachusetts. She also interned at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida.

11 Comments

  1. I heard (correct me if I’m wrong) that a large part of the problem is sugar cane farmers burning before harvesting because it’s cheaper for some reason. If that’s the case, wouldn’t it be very easy to fine the processing plants if they accept burnt cane? One guard on the gate would cover a large area. Mind you, in Thailand more likely you would have one very rich guard!

  2. Apportion the blame to local government and Myanmar, that way he doesn’t need to do anything himself as it’s not his fault.
    Drones, efficient Police and huge fines would do the job, it’s not Rocket Science

  3. I really wish that writers would retire the word “haze” with regards to northern Thailand’s toxic air. “Haze” minimizes the gravity of the problem: makes it sound more like a foggy sunrise on the coast instead of PM 2.5 levels of between 200-800 that is literally killing people in numbers far worst then COVID-19.

    1. I agree, but you are asking for honesty in this story. Honesty would suggest doing something about it to help the citizens. Governments today are rarely honest or interested the the health of its citizens.

  4. Why is it happening now and not years ago?
    Maybe it is exhaust from motor vehicles. There are many more than years ago.
    If that is the case make it the law all motors, including industrial motors, are fitted with catalytic converters.

    1. The dickhead been saying that for years. Nothing will change except the size of his bank roll. And no, its not seasonal haze. It’s smoke, toxic air, hazardous aqi levels, pollution. You and your crony gov will never do a damn thing about it. Quit sweet talking the public

  5. I agree, but you are asking for honesty in this story. Honesty would suggest doing something about it to help the citizens. Governments today are rarely honest or interested the the health of its citizens.

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