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Important rules and behaviours for driving in Thailand


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10 minutes ago, Bluesofa said:

I quote that same figure in emails to cyclists coming to stay with us passing through the country, in the hope they are more aware.
Well, before covid screwed that one up anyway.

Don't forget I speak with experience.
Seven months ago I was hit by a car driven by a doctor in a hurry to get to work - irony.
I was cycling in the wide motorbike lane on a dual carriageway. She was in the first car lane, not paying attention and veered across the lane hitting me.
 

She was just trying to drum up business. 🤣

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1 hour ago, Bluesofa said:

Passing parked cars.

Never done that, sweetcorn yes; is it painful?

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2 minutes ago, Faraday said:

Never done that, sweetcorn yes; is it painful?

Could be a right Hummer

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Hey lads, we are running out of stories to comment on, a few stories have been closed as some people have gone off tracks and had a right old ding-dong arguing with each other, this seem to be the trend at the moment so we the 'innocent' lose out.

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10 minutes ago, Faraday said:
1 hour ago, Bluesofa said:

Passing parked cars.

Never done that, sweetcorn yes; is it painful?

Or sh!tting bricks.
From what I've read those old Russian cars must be the easiest? Well people always used to refer to the sh!t Ladas.

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4 minutes ago, JamesR said:

Hey lads, we are running out of stories to comment on, a few stories have been closed as some people have gone off tracks and had a right old ding-dong arguing with each other, this seem to be the trend at the moment so we the 'innocent' lose out.

Yes I think the same. Who is going to be first to start a thread where the topic is for the next poster to say something totally different ? 🤣 That should be fun . Also perhaps another topic could be where the next poster has to write something even more exaggerated and padded with BS than the previous one, that should attract a few to.   They would always be on topic of course

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1 hour ago, Changnam43 said:

Yes. That is what happens when a two tonne pick up truck hits somebody on a scooter.

I think you'll find there are more reasons for these deaths - not wearing a crash helmet is a significant factor. Although the mixing of fast and slow vehicles on poorly built roads would be a significant factor.

Motorcycles are of course very vulnerable in any case.

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4 hours ago, KaptainRob said:

one must drive defensively.

But assertively. It's the whole ying/yang thing.

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10 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

most of the anecdotal incidents described here are not limited to Thailand.

That could be true, I don't know.
What I can remember is there's about 160 road deaths daily here in Thailand.
Doing a quick search for the same deaths in the UK - similar population - it appears to be 5 per day for 2019.

 

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1 hour ago, Bluesofa said:

That could be true, I don't know.
What I can remember is there's about 160 road deaths daily here in Thailand.
Doing a quick search for the same deaths in the UK - similar population - it appears to be 5 per day for 2019.

 

I've driven all over western Europe and on other continents - Any tale here can be seen anywhere else - in particular take a look at videos of China and Russia.

People tend to cite incidents they witness without realise they are simply engaging in confirmation bias.

If you really dig about, you'll find that the difference in the number of collisions is nowhere near that big - the difference is the amount of people who sustain injuries or don't survive.

Of course, just comparing the UK is not the point.

Your figure of 160 is wildly off the mark - it's about 60 per day - but a lot of this depends on which statistics you look at. Just citing deaths per day is not really a comprehensive way of looking at the situation; that's only one figure - it ignores cars per capita, mileage per vehicle etc. These are taken into account by the original stat gatherers but usually ignored by the media - so a distorted picture emerges in the press.

In the deaths per day figure, 80% of deaths in Thailand are "vulnerable road users" - which refers to pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, 3 -wheelers and  those who are easily injured and killed or injured in a car-dominated road space. This is not just down to the vehicles themselves but to transport planning, which often lacks inclusion and is influenced by forces that favour motor vehicles....this is especially the case in Thailand. in car your chances of dying are about the same as the USA

 

 

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7 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

most of the anecdotal incidents described here are not limited to Thailand.

They are probably not, but certainly more prevalent & deadly.

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18 minutes ago, Faraday said:

Interesting. The UK road deaths I quoted earlier of 5 per day came from using the same figure.

I mistakenly quoted Thai deaths as 160 per day. I meant to write 60 per day. Well it was the middle of the night when I (mis)wrote it. My mistake, sorry.

The Thaiger link says 12,000 deaths per year (32 deaths per day).
However, that same article also says:
"Academics caution that this figure only relates to those who die at the scene, and the actual death toll is far higher when when all all data is collated, and when victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene.
The total annual Thai death toll, over recent years, is between 21,000 – 24,000, making it one of the worst in the world (currently #5 in the world according to World Health Orginisation [sic] data)."

60 deaths per day equates to 22,000 deaths per year.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Bluesofa said:

Interesting. The UK road deaths I quoted earlier of 5 per day came from using the same figure.

I mistakenly quoted Thai deaths as 160 per day. I meant to write 60 per day. Well it was the middle of the night when I (mis)wrote it. My mistake, sorry.

The Thaiger link says 12,000 deaths per year (32 deaths per day).
However, that same article also says:
"Academics caution that this figure only relates to those who die at the scene, and the actual death toll is far higher when when all all data is collated, and when victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene.
The total annual Thai death toll, over recent years, is between 21,000 – 24,000, making it one of the worst in the world (currently #5 in the world according to World Health Orginisation [sic] data)."

60 deaths per day equates to 22,000 deaths per year.

You were probably actually nearer the mark with the 160 you mistakenly quoted because to hide the true number of roads deaths the Thai authorities only count those people dead at the scene. The other poor buggers who had life threatening injuries as a result of the accident yet died in hospital later don't count.  So the real death toll if they reported facts possibly would be well over 50,000 a year making them the worst nation on earth.

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2 minutes ago, gummy said:

You were probably actually nearer the mark with the 160 you mistakenly quoted because to hide the true number of roads deaths the Thai authorities only count those people dead at the scene. The other poor buggers who had life threatening injuries as a result of the accident yet died in hospital later don't count.  So the real death toll if they reported facts possibly would be well over 50,000 a year making them the worst nation on earth.

Hmm, OK. Even I wouldn't think it's that high although we'll never be certain.

I notice in the Thaiger article I quoted it said, "the actual death toll is far higher when when all all data is collated, and when victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene."

'victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene' I think the wording on there could be better chosen. It gives the impression of walking wounded.
I'm sure it must be referring to 'being transported from the accident scene.'

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Just now, Bluesofa said:

Hmm, OK. Even I wouldn't think it's that high although we'll never be certain.

I notice in the Thaiger article I quoted it said, "the actual death toll is far higher when when all all data is collated, and when victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene."

'victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene' I think the wording on there could be better chosen. It gives the impression of walking wounded.
I'm sure it must be referring to 'being transported from the accident scene.'

Possibly or being cynical "victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene' alludes to them dying a while after the accident whilst walking on the pavement with crutches  and being run down and killed by another drunk Thai male pick-up driver

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23 minutes ago, gummy said:

Possibly or being cynical "victims succumb to their injuries after leaving the accident scene' alludes to them dying a while after the accident whilst walking on the pavement with crutches  and being run down and killed by another drunk Thai male pick-up driver

Yeah, but the problem there is that whoever it was caused the first accident and the pick-up driver would only get half-a-point each.

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13 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

The greatest danger in Thai roads is foreigners ... to themselves.

almost to a man they over estimate their driving skills and consider themselves better than Thai people. 

You have been a back seat driver in a zillion farang cars then....?  🤔

May I point out, that what ever your assumptions are, "to a man", those foreign drivers were taught and passed a test to drive, that cannot be said for drivers in LOS...🙄

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11 hours ago, Faraday said:

They are probably not, but certainly more prevalent & deadly.

No this is a misconception - it is also a misconception of how accidents occur - As I said the countries with the  dendrites that are TEN TIMEs LESS than Thailand have only about 1/3 less collisions. The DEADLINESS is related to the nature of the the environment the crashes take place.

 

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8 hours ago, Transam said:

You have been a back seat driver in a zillion farang cars then....?  🤔

May I point out, that what ever your assumptions are, "to a man", those foreign drivers were taught and passed a test to drive, that cannot be said for drivers in LOS...🙄

Actually this is not totally true or really relevant.

most foreigners over 50 had very rudimentary road tests and some countries and States had virtually none.

Whereas driving training prepares you for a bit of road safety, in reality even now that do very little in the long term. Drivers unfortunately think that because they have been driving for a long time, they are EXPERIENCED when in reality they have mostly just developed bad habits. None of this prepares them for driving outside their own county.

Tests in Thailand are getting much better but corruption of course is still prevalent - but a test if taken long side training in any country is no guarantee of a good diver.

What one actually needs is the tools and mental ability to adapt to road conditions wherever you are in the world.

Thai drivers are in general used to driving in Thailand. many foreign drivers bring a lot of "baggage" from their home countries and really can't cope.

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16 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

Actually this is not totally true or really relevant.

most foreigners over 50 had very rudimentary road tests and some countries and States had virtually none.

Whereas driving training prepares you for a bit of road safety, in reality even now that do very little in the long term. Drivers unfortunately think that because they have been driving for a long time, they are EXPERIENCED when in reality they have mostly just developed bad habits. None of this prepares them for driving outside their own county.

Tests in Thailand are getting much better but corruption of course is still prevalent - but a test if taken long side training in any country is no guarantee of a good diver.

What one actually needs is the tools and mental ability to adapt to road conditions wherever you are in the world.

Thai drivers are in general used to driving in Thailand. many foreign drivers bring a lot of "baggage" from their home countries and really can't cope.

Total generalised nonsense. 

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7 minutes ago, JamesR said:

Total generalised nonsense. 

Most of what is posted here comes under that heading.

unfortunately foreigners perception of road safety is totally skewed.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, JamesR said:

Total generalised nonsense. 

So - in your opinion why are there so many deaths on Thai roads?

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40 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

Actually this is not totally true or really relevant.

most foreigners over 50 had very rudimentary road tests and some countries and States had virtually none.

Whereas driving training prepares you for a bit of road safety, in reality even now that do very little in the long term. Drivers unfortunately think that because they have been driving for a long time, they are EXPERIENCED when in reality they have mostly just developed bad habits. None of this prepares them for driving outside their own county.

Tests in Thailand are getting much better but corruption of course is still prevalent - but a test if taken long side training in any country is no guarantee of a good diver.

What one actually needs is the tools and mental ability to adapt to road conditions wherever you are in the world.

Thai drivers are in general used to driving in Thailand. many foreign drivers bring a lot of "baggage" from their home countries and really can't cope.

All wrong - except for the "Thai drivers are in general used to driving in Thailand" bit - and even that doesn't make them competent.

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