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A 70 year old Thai grandfather was taken hostage by his 35 year old grandson in a Bangkok hotel leading to a standoff that ended when police tased the man. The incident took place in the Charoen Krung area of Bang Rak in the capital city. The grandson had recently been released from prison one month prior after serving a sentence for theft. It was reported that he had not found any employment since he was released. He had left his home two days ago telling his family that he was off to search for his girlfriend, and family members […]

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13 minutes ago, Thaiger said:

A 70 year old Thai grandfather was taken hostage by his 35 year old grandson in a Bangkok hotel leading to a standoff that ended when police tased the man

I thought the word was 'tasered'?
Not that I've ever been tased or tasered.

But just to prove I am anal, I looked it up:
[quote]
In trying to find out, I’ve discovered that the word spelled Taser is a registered trademark. It is an acroynm for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle.”...
...Since I now know the origin of the word and that it is trademarked, I feel I should opt for the capitalized form with an s:The policeman used a Taser. The guard Tasered the man with the gun.
[unquote]
source: https://www.dailywritingtips.com/taser-or-tazer-tazing-or-tasering/   

 

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So much for the Thai prison system rehabilitating inmates..... It started with theft and after prison time....hostage taking....your grandfather?? Obviously there needs to be a half way point for parolled prisoners and the chance at employment to give them the best chance of rejoining life in a positive way.

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According to Thai news outlets it wasn't his grandfather the hostage taker grabbed. It was the granddaughter that was originally taken hostage but got away from the assailant. The felon will now enter the prison system for the 17th time if convicted.

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37 minutes ago, Bluesofa said:

I thought the word was 'tasered'?
Not that I've ever been tased or tasered.

But just to prove I am anal, I looked it up:
[quote]
In trying to find out, I’ve discovered that the word spelled Taser is a registered trademark. It is an acroynm for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle.”...
...Since I now know the origin of the word and that it is trademarked, I feel I should opt for the capitalized form with an s:The policeman used a Taser. The guard Tasered the man with the gun.
[unquote]
source: https://www.dailywritingtips.com/taser-or-tazer-tazing-or-tasering/   

Perhaps they meanted teased .. or tasted even if you dropped a t in there .. 

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1 hour ago, mickkotlarski said:

According to Thai news outlets it wasn't his grandfather the hostage taker grabbed. It was the granddaughter that was originally taken hostage but got away from the assailant. The felon will now enter the prison system for the 17th time if convicted.

17th time?

I suspect the guy likes it in there.

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2 minutes ago, Rookiescot said:

17th time?

I suspect the guy likes it in there.

Better than being in society. Well at least he gets his meals free of charge.

But what shocked me is was arrested 13 times as a minor.

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2 minutes ago, mickkotlarski said:

Better than being in society. Well at least he gets his meals free of charge.

But what shocked me is was arrested 13 times as a minor.

OK usually I'm pretty liberal but in this guys case I'm going to make an exception.

They should lock him up and throw away the key. He is not going to change. Jail is not an effective deterrent. Chances are the crimes he will commit will get steadily more excessive. 

There are just some people who will never conform to society. 

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3 hours ago, Jason said:

So much for the Thai prison system rehabilitating inmates..... It started with theft and after prison time....hostage taking....your grandfather?? Obviously there needs to be a half way point for parolled prisoners and the chance at employment to give them the best chance of rejoining life in a positive way.

Does prison really rehabilitate? Criminologists will tell you that males under the age of 30 are disproportionately most likely to be inmates, and then they either stop offending because of commitments to family such as a wife and kids, or they get an "education" in prison which makes them more difficult to catch.

Personally, I think the only real purpose that prisons serve, is to give the public a rest from the offenders anti-social behaviour. But I think you've identified a major problem in the penal system. Once the offender is released, very little is done to help them stay out of prison. Not that this should excuse this particular case.

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2 hours ago, mickkotlarski said:

Better than being in society. Well at least he gets his meals free of charge.

But what shocked me is was arrested 13 times as a minor.

You've just reminded me about the Irish Famine. In it's worst year, 1848, Kilmainham Gaol, the then largest "nick" in Ireland saw a 600% increase in it's intake. Most of these cases were the hungry who would steal a loaf of bread or something equally "serious", and then wait to be arrested so they could be guaranteed a few meals. The typical sentence for this was 14 days. 

When the British Gov heard about this, they ordered that prisoners rations be cut by a quarter to make a prison sentence less attractive. I don't think it had a great deal of effect on the prob. I would imagine the hungry would have taken the view, "Three-quarters of a loaf is better than no loaf at all",

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33 minutes ago, JohninDubin said:

You've just reminded me about the Irish Famine. In it's worst year, 1848, Kilmainham Gaol, the then largest "nick" in Ireland saw a 600% increase in it's intake. Most of these cases were the hungry who would steal a loaf of bread or something equally "serious", and then wait to be arrested so they could be guaranteed a few meals. The typical sentence for this was 14 days. 

When the British Gov heard about this, they ordered that prisoners rations be cut by a quarter to make a prison sentence less attractive. I don't think it had a great deal of effect on the prob. I would imagine the hungry would have taken the view, "Three-quarters of a loaf is better than no loaf at all",

Unfortunately John this is a stark reality with most of the world. Truly sad. But I wonder in cases where a lad commits over 17 arrest able felonies some of which were acts of brutality towards innocent folk that were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Fortunately nobody hurt but motives behind crimes govern the response. Some folk that (believe it or not) actually miss prison can simply throw bricks through windows. Better to be fed and housed incarcerated than suffer on the outside.  

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36 minutes ago, mickkotlarski said:

Unfortunately John this is a stark reality with most of the world. Truly sad. But I wonder in cases where a lad commits over 17 arrest able felonies some of which were acts of brutality towards innocent folk that were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Fortunately nobody hurt but motives behind crimes govern the response. Some folk that (believe it or not) actually miss prison can simply throw bricks through windows. Better to be fed and housed incarcerated than suffer on the outside.  

Unfortunately, I don't think anyone really has the answers to these problems.

I recall when Ken Clarke (One of the Tories I would have voted for) was Justice Sec and he suggested that perhaps there should be a discussion on alternatives to prison. The rank and file Tory party members wanted to lynch him for that.

But here's what he was looking at: In 2001 if a shoplifter was arrested and pleaded guilty the following day at Magistrates, the average penalty was a £100 fine, but it cost £2100 to process this from arrest to conviction. If they elected for a jury trial, the cost went up to £8500 and the penalty averaged out at £250.

In the late 70's or early 80's, Soliciting was no longer an imprisonable offence. The reason for this was that most of the women convicted were single mothers, and often jailing the mother led to her children being taken into care for the duration. In those days, it cost about £300 per week to jail someone, and about £350 to take a child into care. A working girl with a couple of kids was costing the state £1k for every week she spent in prison.

Instead they substituted fines. Now the woman has to go back on the streets to pay the fines. Eventually the fines accumulated and she was brought before the courts for non-payment of fines, which usually led to jail sentence.

Nowadays it costs about £700 a week to lock someone up, and £900 to put a child into care.

Do you think we might have done ourselves any harm listening to what Clarke might have had to say?

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3 minutes ago, JohninDubin said:

Unfortunately, I don't think anyone really has the answers to these problems.

I recall when Ken Clarke (One of the Tories I would have voted for) was Justice Sec and he suggested that perhaps there should be a discussion on alternatives to prison. The rank and file Tory party members wanted to lynch him for that.

But here's what he was looking at: In 2001 if a shoplifter was arrested and pleaded guilty the following day at Magistrates, the average penalty was a £100 fine, but it cost £2100 to process this from arrest to conviction. If they elected for a jury trial, the cost went up to £8500 and the penalty averaged out at £250.

In the late 70's or early 80's, Soliciting was no longer an imprisonable offence. The reason for this was that most of the women convicted were single mothers, and often jailing the mother led to her children being taken into care for the duration. In those days, it cost about £300 per week to jail someone, and about £350 to take a child into care. A working girl with a couple of kids was costing the state £1k for every week she spent in prison.

Instead they substituted fines. Now the woman has to go back on the streets to pay the fines. Eventually the fines accumulated and she was brought before the courts for non-payment of fines, which usually led to jail sentence.

Nowadays it costs about £700 a week to lock someone up, and £900 to put a child into care.

Do you think we might have done ourselves any harm listening to what Clarke might have had to say?

Eye opening. The vicious circles need a tangent to be broken and unfortunately so few exist in reality.

Thank you for the reply John.

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24 minutes ago, mickkotlarski said:

Eye opening. The vicious circles need a tangent to be broken and unfortunately so few exist in reality.

Thank you for the reply John.

You're more than welcome. I know we don't agree on everything but I think you always give me a fair hearing.

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After hearing the details on the box I actually thought this was a different news story altogether. Poor source providing the information or lost in translation.

Edited by KaptainRob
Disparaging quote by RM removed
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10 hours ago, JohninDubin said:

You're more than welcome. I know we don't agree on everything but I think you always give me a fair hearing.

Cheers old boy. The disagreements are welcome as constructive criticism has a value of its own. However do note how often we have also agreed even when occasionally our original views are initially opposed. You're a pleasure to contact.

Very impressed about comments you made in the US declaring support for Taiwan if attacked by China thread. You are pro unity through democratic means and I'm pro freedom through democratic means but in this thread it was 2 houses of democracy combined. 

 

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  • KaptainRob changed the title to News Forum - Thai man takes hostage in Bangkok standoff
18 hours ago, Bluesofa said:

I thought the word was 'tasered'?
Not that I've ever been tased or tasered.

But just to prove I am anal, I looked it up:
[quote]
In trying to find out, I’ve discovered that the word spelled Taser is a registered trademark. It is an acroynm for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle.”...
...Since I now know the origin of the word and that it is trademarked, I feel I should opt for the capitalized form with an s:The policeman used a Taser. The guard Tasered the man with the gun.
[unquote]
source: https://www.dailywritingtips.com/taser-or-tazer-tazing-or-tasering/   

Thanks grammar police.  And yea..you probably do like to receive anal.  

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3 hours ago, kmc said:

Thanks grammar police.  And yea..you probably do like to receive anal.  

Nothing wrong with expecting the journalist to spell the word correctly, or is their they're there?

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5 hours ago, mickkotlarski said:

Cheers old boy. The disagreements are welcome as constructive criticism has a value of its own. However do note how often we have also agreed even when occasionally our original views are initially opposed. You're a pleasure to contact.

Very impressed about comments you made in the US declaring support for Taiwan if attacked by China thread. You are pro unity through democratic means and I'm pro freedom through democratic means but in this thread it was 2 houses of democracy combined. 

I think we agree on lot more than we disagree. Regardless, what I particularly like about this forum is that there are plenty that I disagree with who I can still respect in a debate. All I really need is to be spared from whataboutery and brainwashed populism.

Just to clarify, I'm not sure I've ever given any thought to the unification of China, but as you imply, it would have to be done through democratic means. 

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32 minutes ago, JohninDubin said:

I think we agree on lot more than we disagree. Regardless, what I particularly like about this forum is that there are plenty that I disagree with who I can still respect in a debate. All I really need is to be spared from whataboutery and brainwashed populism.

Just to clarify, I'm not sure I've ever given any thought to the unification of China, but as you imply, it would have to be done through democratic means. 

Which is why I crossed swords with Poolie. Unification must be a mutual agreement. Should the PRC over run Taiwan by force then virtually nobody would support it. I'm quite sure most Taiwanese would not want the motherland suddenly controlling their lives.

You're not the only one that has given so little thought to this issue as (at least from the view of democracy)  it is highly unlikely. Even the 2 Korea's reunification would be easier. 

 

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32 minutes ago, mickkotlarski said:

Which is why I crossed swords with Poolie. Unification must be a mutual agreement. Should the PRC over run Taiwan by force then virtually nobody would support it. I'm quite sure most Taiwanese would not want the motherland suddenly controlling their lives.

You're not the only one that has given so little thought to this issue as (at least from the view of democracy)  it is highly unlikely. Even the 2 Korea's reunification would be easier. 

My lack of consideration of the matter is purely because I don't see the PRC changing. The two Ireland's, which I am more familiar with, has plenty in common regarding democratic institutions, and it is already laid down that unification will happen with the democratic consent of both sides. That element is missing from China/Taiwan. I don't see it changing for a long time if ever.

The Iron curtain fell because of the financial war of attrition they had inflicted upon them. There is no sign of the Bamboo Curtain facing a similar fate in the foreseeable future.

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49 minutes ago, JohninDubin said:

My lack of consideration of the matter is purely because I don't see the PRC changing. The two Ireland's, which I am more familiar with, has plenty in common regarding democratic institutions, and it is already laid down that unification will happen with the democratic consent of both sides. That element is missing from China/Taiwan. I don't see it changing for a long time if ever.

The Iron curtain fell because of the financial war of attrition they had inflicted upon them. There is no sign of the Bamboo Curtain facing a similar fate in the foreseeable future.

EXACTLY!!!!!

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