Jump to content

News Forum - Thailand to require 3 million baht insurance for non- OA immigrant visas


Thaiger
 Share

Recommended Posts

On 10/20/2021 at 1:05 PM, longwood50 said:

First point, if there was truly a problem with foreigners running up insurance bills and not paying there are other ways to address that.  Personally, I don't believe it.  If I go to a hospital and want service, I am required to pay often in advance for treatment.  A friend of mine who is Thai was fell and had a badly broken leg that required surgery.  She went to Bangkok hospital that required she pay in advance for her treatment.  The simple solution "if there really is a problem" is to require a payment of perhaps 1,000 to 5,000 baht for the visa extension and put that money in a fund to be used to reimburse hospitals for bills incurred by foreigners that go unpaid. 

Are these people that delusional that they can not see the result of this policy.  Any foreigner considering Thailand for retirement will immediately exclude it knowing that eventually they will not be able to obtain or afford the required health insurance.  Those foreigners already here will be forced to liquidate their condo's and homes and move elsewhere causing prices to plummet.  That will impact not just the foreigners but the value of those residences owned by Thai's.  Seeing the value of their home now worth less than what they owe, Thai's will walk away from their homes leaving the banks with huge losses from repossessed properties. 

At the very least, even the consideration of this as a proposal has negative consequences.  Those considering retiring here will now pause or choose someplace else and those already here may out of caution sell their residence and head to exit Thailand seeing that the value of their residence and even their ability to stay here is in peril. 

The Thai Immigration office stated in their advisory, that $13m in hospital bills is annually unpaid by foreigners. This is not large 3nough to be a concern (thailand earns $30B annually from tourists.

So, this new higher insurance requirement is only caused by covid. And should disappear with covid in a year or two. IMHO.

Edited by Faz
double posting of comment removed.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/20/2021 at 10:55 AM, yetanother said:

i pray it isnt true;

however it in line with the general thai philosophy of encouraging , and in this case, enforcing, monies to flow from farang to thai, this time with the insurance company's money grab;

happy insurance companies; likely lock a lot of us outside of thailand when hit 70

Insurance companies are the biggest crooks on this earth, con merchants the lot of them, with all that legal jargon which is meant to help them to refuse your claim if they can get away with it.

Also their small print which is small because they don't want you to notice it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/20/2021 at 12:03 PM, Paco said:

Why change things that do not need a change... stupid

The insurance companies and the Thai Junta are a good mix, all money orientated.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Graexx said:

The Thai Immigration office stated in their advisory, that $13m in hospital bills is annually unpaid by foreigners. This is not large 3nough to be a concern (thailand earns $30B annually from tourists.

So, this new higher insurance requirement is only caused by covid. And should disappear with covid in a year or two. IMHO.

It has nothing to do with Covid, it's for accidents, illness, operations.
It was introduced as a requirement long before Covid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Graexx said:

The Thai Immigration office stated in their advisory, that $13m in hospital bills is annually unpaid by foreigners. This is not large 3nough to be a concern (thailand earns $30B annually from tourists.

So, this new higher insurance requirement is only caused by covid. And should disappear with covid in a year or two. IMHO.

There is a saying when it comes to generating new revenue  

”Never let a crisis go to waste”

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off I really don't know how this can be a problem.  When I go to the hospital they won't treat me without insurance or without payment up front.  Usually both. 

Now this is from the Thai government. It says that there was 448 million baht in unpaid medical expenses.  and 38 million visitors.  That amounts to 11.79 baht per visitor. 

So charge each visitor 100 baht that would raise 3.8 billion baht.  More than 8.5 times the amount necessary to cover any unpaid bills.  No tourist will squawk over 100 baht. But the hassle to obtain a 50,000 USD medical insurance policy will be way way more than 100 baht and the paperwork to obtain it enough to drive some tourists away. 

This is strictly a scheme by the insurance companies to use the government to force tourists to pay inflated insurance fees for coverage they will for the most part never use. 




image.thumb.png.b05c59dc8002973ec9a5c7ece724bf02.png

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, longwood50 said:

First off I really don't know how this can be a problem.  When I go to the hospital they won't treat me without insurance or without payment up front.  Usually both. 

Now this is from the Thai government. It says that there was 448 million baht in unpaid medical expenses.  and 38 million visitors.  That amounts to 11.79 baht per visitor. 

So charge each visitor 100 baht that would raise 3.8 billion baht.  More than 8.5 times the amount necessary to cover any unpaid bills.  No tourist will squawk over 100 baht. But the hassle to obtain a 50,000 USD medical insurance policy will be way way more than 100 baht and the paperwork to obtain it enough to drive some tourists away. 

This is strictly a scheme by the insurance companies to use the government to force tourists to pay inflated insurance fees for coverage they will for the most part never use. 




image.thumb.png.b05c59dc8002973ec9a5c7ece724bf02.png

yeah correct "When I go to the hospital they won't treat me without insurance or without payment up front.  Usually both. "

 

i also do not understand and most of the time they rather have you pay cash up front then insurance you really have to push them to call the insurance...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am on a retirement O-A visa for 2 years now.  When I came here in 2018  there was no insurance requirement for the O-A visa .

Now at age72, and with my preexisting conditions,  it is impossible for me to get any health insurance here in Phuket, where I support and live with my Thai wife and our family. 

Last year during my anual renewal process, the Thai immigration officers did not require me to have the new medical insurance that was recently added to the requirements for new retirees.  

I was told then, that I was grandfathered in. 

All I needed was my bank deposit to be up to date, and and new paperwork to be updated,  and i was good until May 2022, with my one year Retirement O-A visa. 

Now I am starting worry that I might not be able to stay next year, if the rules have changed to require the new insurance rules for ALL expats, not just the new retirees.  

I have full medical insurance in the USA. If I need new Hip,  I  would fly back home for the procedure. Not sure now  if they will let my fly back to Phuket without the new medical insurance.   I feel trapped like Catch 22.  Any one herd what could happen during my next renewal in 2022? 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/21/2021 at 4:15 PM, Faz said:

Gladly Bob.

From the Thai Embassy, UK.
https://london.thaiembassy.org/en/publicservice/84508-non-immigrant-visas?page=5d6636cd15e39c3bd00072dd&menu=5f4b6eb3f6ae4b236972c562

This page lists all the available Non Imm type Visas available.

  • Non-Immigrant Type (Retirement (pensioner aged 50 or above with a state pension who wants to stay in Thailand for no longer than 90 days) - single entry only)
  • Financial evidence e.g. A copy of pension statement if the applicant is a pensioner, or a copy of 1-month bank statement showing your income from pension, or 3-month bank statement of at least £10,000
  • Confirmation of legal residence in the UK or Ireland. Copy of health insurance that covers COVID-19 related medical expenses, both inpatient and outpatient, no less than 100,000 USD for the whole period of your stay in Thailand.
  •  

Thai Embassy DC USA.
» Visa and Certificate of Entry for Non-Thai nationals who wish to obtain a retirement visa or a long-stay visa (Non-Immigrant Category O (retirement) / O-A / O-X) or who is currently holding re-entry permit for such visas (thaiembdc.org)

Non-Immigrant Visa Category “O” (retirement)

Purpose of Visit: This type of visa may be issued to applicants aged 50 years and over who wish to stay in Thailand for a period of not exceeding 90 days without the intention of working. Holder of this type of visa is allowed to stay in Thailand for 90 days. Employment of any kind is strictly prohibited.

Eligibility:
1. Applicant must be aged 50 years and over (on the day of submitting application)
2. Applicant not prohibited from entering the Kingdom as provided by the Immigration Act B.E. 2522 (1979)
3. Having the nationality of or residence in the country where applicant’s application is submitted
4. Applicant must have a Thai health insurance for the duration of stay, with coverage for outpatient treatment of no less than 40,000 baht and inpatient treatment of no less than 400,000 baht

I think your misunderstanding and confusion Bob, is probably based on past information.
In your case, where your Thai Embassy/Consulates don't offer the Non O (90 day) single entry Visa for the reason of retirement, the alternative is to enter Thailand either Visa exempt or on a Tourist Visa.

Immigration offer a service to change your status from one as 'Tourist' to 'Non Immigrant'.
As your aware you cannot apply for a 1 year extension of stay from a 'Tourist' status, you must have a 'Non Immigrant' status. If you entered VE, you must complete form TM87 requesting a Non Imm O, or if entering on a Tourist Visa, form TM86 requesting a change of Visa status to Non Imm O.

The full procedure and requirements based on retirement here:
VE-TV to Non O Retirement.pdf

Similarly, if you had Thai family/spouse but entered Thailand VE, or on a Tourist Visa, you can apply for the Non Imm O based on marriage at a local Immigration office.
The full procedure and requirements here:
VE-TV to Non O Spouse.pdf

I hope this helps to unravel your misunderstanding.

Hi Faz - thanks for that. It seems we are in what is called 'violent agreement'. Yes, apparently you can apply for an O 'retirement' Visa in some countries, but I think you will actually see that it is not really a 'Retirement' Visa because it is only valid for 90 days. You then have to apply for an extension of that Visa every 90 days, whereas under a 'real' O-A Retirement Visa (Or O for Marriage/ Education etc) it is valid for 12 months from the date you enter, and thereafter you apply for an annual extension.  But you are right in that it is called O Visa (retirement), but it is only valid for 90 days.

The questions I now have are:  Can that 90 days 'retirement' Visa be granted a 12 months extension of permission to say? If not, which I think it is because the Thai website indicates only 90 days extensions, is there a annual limit on those extensions - like they have imposed for extensions of Tourist Visas (to stop those people who were doing 4 border runs every year).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/21/2021 at 12:23 PM, AussieBob said:

All Retirement Visas are O-A Visa or O-X Visas. There is no O Visa for 'Retirement'.  Mandatory insurance definitely applies to all new O-A Retirement Visas and has since October 2019. And as some already have found out, the rules are that all future Annual Extensions require the mandated insurance but it has to be a policy that has been approved from an approved Thai Company (there is a list link in the original story). However, some local Immigration offices seem to not be applying that rule for Extensions of older O-A Visas (pre-2019) - unlikely to last forever.  

 

 ... my Visa simply states "non-o".  I changed it in 2018 from volunteer to based on retirement. I haven't had to provide insurance ever
 
Below is quote from Thai Visa Advise explaining the different Non-O type visa's 
 
[In-country Non-O visa]
One type of visa that wasn't mentioned is an in-country Non-O visa. SOME immigration offices allow a person to purchase an in-country Non-O visa based on retirement, if they have more then a certain amount of time remaining on their existing "admitted to" stamp. This visa allows a person to stay in Thailand for 90 days. These in-country Non-O visas DO NOT require health insurance. To stay longer then 90 days, a one year extension of stay based on retirement must be acquired.

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OA has always been a problem, the easiest way around all this is, when Thailand really is fully open again : Let your OA expire, exit the country come back on tourist visa and get your non-o. Then again Thailand will probably make 12 different new visa's next year with different requirements again till someone wakes up and opens the country mexico style.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, AussieBob said:

Hi Faz - thanks for that. It seems we are in what is called 'violent agreement'. Yes, apparently you can apply for an O 'retirement' Visa in some countries, but I think you will actually see that it is not really a 'Retirement' Visa because it is only valid for 90 days.

As I repeatedly state Bob, there is no such Visa named a 'Retirement' Visa, they are Non Immigrant Visas.
You apply for a Non Imm O on the basis and intention of retirement, marriage, voluntary work, etc in Thailand. The only difference are the requirements for each type.

3 hours ago, AussieBob said:

You then have to apply for an extension of that Visa every 90 days, whereas under a 'real' O-A Retirement Visa (Or O for Marriage/ Education etc) it is valid for 12 months from the date you enter, and thereafter you apply for an annual extension. 

Your still a little confused there Bob.
Of the Non O class Visa only the O-A and O-X type permit a stay of 1 year on entry. All other Non O types, even the Non O multiple entry Visa only permit a stay of 90 days on entry.
All extension applications based on retirement/Thai spouse are for a period of 12 months.
I think your confusing the validity of a Visa to enter the Country, with the period of stay granted on entry.
May I suggest you read Common Visa Types explained. - > Visas, Long Stay, Extensions, Re-entry Permit - Thaiger Talk (thethaiger.com) which explain the basics of different Visa types.
If you can't understand a particular Visa type Bob, please state which and I'll happily explain.

3 hours ago, AussieBob said:

The questions I now have are:  Can that 90 days 'retirement' Visa be granted a 12 months extension of permission to say? If not, which I think it is because the Thai website indicates only 90 days extensions, is there a annual limit on those extensions - like they have imposed for extensions of Tourist Visas (to stop those people who were doing 4 border runs every year).

With the exception of the temporary STV there are no 90 day extensions available to apply for.
If you entered VE or TV you can apply for a one time 30 day extension on each entry.
If you have Thai family/spouse, you can apply for a one time 60 day extension on each entry.
{It's therefore possible to stay for almost 5 months when entering on a Tourist Visa and having Thai spouse. 60 + 30 +60 = 150 days).

The Non Imm O permits a stay of 90 days on entry. Within the last 30 days of that 90 days you can apply for an 1 year extension of stay based on retirement or Thai/spouse subject to meeting the financial requirements. Thereafter each and every year you apply to extend that stay for another year.
There is no limit on the number of times you can apply for that 1 year extension, that's how I and thousands of other foreigners stay in Thailand continually for years.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, garyw007 said:

I am on a retirement O-A visa for 2 years now.  When I came here in 2018  there was no insurance requirement for the O-A visa .

Now at age72, and with my preexisting conditions,  it is impossible for me to get any health insurance here in Phuket, where I support and live with my Thai wife and our family. 

Last year during my anual renewal process, the Thai immigration officers did not require me to have the new medical insurance that was recently added to the requirements for new retirees.  

I was told then, that I was grandfathered in. 

All I needed was my bank deposit to be up to date, and and new paperwork to be updated,  and i was good until May 2022, with my one year Retirement O-A visa. 

Now I am starting worry that I might not be able to stay next year, if the rules have changed to require the new insurance rules for ALL expats, not just the new retirees.  

I have full medical insurance in the USA. If I need new Hip,  I  would fly back home for the procedure. Not sure now  if they will let my fly back to Phuket without the new medical insurance.   I feel trapped like Catch 22.  Any one herd what could happen during my next renewal in 2022? 

The general rumours ( nothing written in stone yet ) is that the 3M health insurance will be initially required for new OA visas and on Sept 2022 will be required for retirement extensions ( from an OA visa ) so you should be good in May 2022 but it will hopefully become more clearer over the next month or 2.

 

Having said that all expats on a retirement extension ( OA visa ) should be seriously considering their options.

Travel oseas + return visa exempt or with an O visa with a view to achieve extension from an O visa.

Explore the possibility of taking a health insurance policy which will give adequate coverage for your needs + meeting the OA insurance requirements.

Converting to an extension ( OA ) based on marriage which currently does not require the mandatory insurance.

@garyw007, i see you are married to a thai national, you could consider changing your basis for extension which would not require any mandatory insurance or the need to leave the country.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ThatGuy said:

Let your OA expire, exit the country come back on tourist visa and get your non-o.

If your Non O-A Visa was issued before 23rd October 2020, then it's already expired and your extending your permission of stay in Thailand, a permit, not a Visa.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, DwizzleyMatthews said:

@garyw007, i see you are married to a thai national, you could consider changing your basis for extension which would not require any mandatory insurance or the need to leave the country.

@garyw007 obviously obtained his Non O-A Visa prior to the mandatory Health Insurance requirement for that Visa type, he also lives in Phuket, which has it's own separate requirements compared to every other Immigration office throughout the Country.
If he lived elsewhere he would require the mandatory Health Insurance for extension applications based on retirement.

As you correctly state, from an original Non Imm O-A entry, if you change the reason of your extension application from 'retirement' to one of 'Thai spouse' then the mandatory Health Insurance doesn't apply.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, garyw007 said:

I am on a retirement O-A visa for 2 years now.  When I came here in 2018  there was no insurance requirement for the O-A visa .

Now at age72, and with my preexisting conditions,  it is impossible for me to get any health insurance here in Phuket, where I support and live with my Thai wife and our family. 

Last year during my anual renewal process, the Thai immigration officers did not require me to have the new medical insurance that was recently added to the requirements for new retirees.  

I was told then, that I was grandfathered in. 

All I needed was my bank deposit to be up to date, and and new paperwork to be updated,  and i was good until May 2022, with my one year Retirement O-A visa. 

Now I am starting worry that I might not be able to stay next year, if the rules have changed to require the new insurance rules for ALL expats, not just the new retirees.  

I have full medical insurance in the USA. If I need new Hip,  I  would fly back home for the procedure. Not sure now  if they will let my fly back to Phuket without the new medical insurance.   I feel trapped like Catch 22.  Any one herd what could happen during my next renewal in 2022? 

Afaik Phuket is the ONLY Immigration Office in the whole of Thailand, that has introduced 'grandfathering' exemptions for the TGIA-approved Thai Health-Insurance policy that is mandatory when applying for the 1-year extension of stay based on your original Non Imm O-A Visa for reason of retirement. 

The website of the Phuket Volunteers < https://piv-phuket.com/long-stay-extensions/retirement/ > specifies:

– If the Non-OA visa from your home country is issued In or BEFORE 2017 then the health insurance is NOT required for your extension.
– If the Non-OA visa from your home country is issued in 2018 or later but the last entry date is before 1 October 2019 then the health insurance is NOT required for your extension.
– If the Non-OA visa from your home country is issued in 2018 or later but the last entry date is AFTER 1 October 2019 then the health insurance IS required for your extension.

So it is possible that you were grandfathered last year because of meeting one of the first two conditions.  Note that also when you are over +75 years or when due to underlying health-conditions, you are not able to subscribe to TGIA approved Thai health-insurance for meeting the Non Imm O-A extension requirement (none of the approved insurers would be willing to accept your application), the Phuket Immigration Office will exempt you from that requirement.

>> However, you wrote that you are 72 years so normally you should be able to find a Thai TGIA-approved insurer willing to accept your application, but if those insurers refuse you (e.g. because of underlying health conditions) you could visit the Phuket Immigration Office with that refusal-letter and they will as good as certain exempt you from that requirement. 

But in your case, being married to a Thai national and even having Thai children, it would be a 'simple' matter of applying for the 1-year Non Imm O-A extension for reason of MARRIAGE or for reason of THAI CHILDREN.  And in that case NO insurance is required, and on top of that the financial requirements for such application are way lower than for a retirement-extension. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The answers for Thailand is to introduce a Health scheme for long term foreigners on annual extensions.

For those who may remember some years ago, foreigners were able to sign up to a Health Insurance scheme at their local Government hospitals and received a card 'Health Insurance for foreigners'.
You paid for a full medical check initially and an annual subscription fee, from memory it wasn't expensive, less than 4,000 THB for the medical and annual cover.

This scheme was only operated at government hospital establishments, not private hospitals.

However after a couple of years a government official spotted the government hospitals were incorrectly offering this service to 'all foreigners', when it was actually designed for foreign workers from Lao, Cambodia, Myanmar. It was then quickly ceased and unavailable to 'all foreigners'.
Medical Check-Ups and Health Insurance for Migrant Workers (prd.go.th)

In the days of Yingluck, the introduction of a government Health scheme for 'all foreigners' was actually discussed and proposed, but what happened next is history.

If there is any concern by the Thai government over the issue of unpaid hospital bills then the solution seems obvious and easy to established. Introduce a Health Insurance scheme all long term foreigners staying in Thailand can contribute into for treatment at Government hospitals, similar to the one for Lao, Cambodian, Myanmar workers.

For those foreigners who want to use private hospitals, private Health Insurance would still be an option, but a voluntary option, not compulsory.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Faz said:

As I repeatedly state Bob, there is no such Visa named a 'Retirement' Visa, they are Non Immigrant Visas.
You apply for a Non Imm O on the basis and intention of retirement, marriage, voluntary work, etc in Thailand. The only difference are the requirements for each type.

Your still a little confused there Bob.
Of the Non O class Visa only the O-A and O-X type permit a stay of 1 year on entry. All other Non O types, even the Non O multiple entry Visa only permit a stay of 90 days on entry.
All extension applications based on retirement/Thai spouse are for a period of 12 months.
I think your confusing the validity of a Visa to enter the Country, with the period of stay granted on entry.
May I suggest you read Common Visa Types explained. - > Visas, Long Stay, Extensions, Re-entry Permit - Thaiger Talk (thethaiger.com) which explain the basics of different Visa types.
If you can't understand a particular Visa type Bob, please state which and I'll happily explain.

With the exception of the temporary STV there are no 90 day extensions available to apply for.
If you entered VE or TV you can apply for a one time 30 day extension on each entry.
If you have Thai family/spouse, you can apply for a one time 60 day extension on each entry.
{It's therefore possible to stay for almost 5 months when entering on a Tourist Visa and having Thai spouse. 60 + 30 +60 = 150 days).

The Non Imm O permits a stay of 90 days on entry. Within the last 30 days of that 90 days you can apply for an 1 year extension of stay based on retirement or Thai/spouse subject to meeting the financial requirements. Thereafter each and every year you apply to extend that stay for another year.
There is no limit on the number of times you can apply for that 1 year extension, that's how I and thousands of other foreigners stay in Thailand continually for years.

I have read the article and sites - thanks for clarifying all that Faz - my bad.  I did not know that you could arrive on a Non-O 90 day Visa (retirement) and then get a 12 month extension - I thought you could only get a 90 day extension for reasons of retirement.  Because you can apply for a 12 months 'retirement' Visa (not the parenthesis) from outside Thailand, I somehow formed the opinion that you could not extended for 12 months after arriving in Thailand.  I know you can for marriage - I helped an old guy get that all sorted a few years ago.  By the way - know this doesn't apply to me because I can get a 'marriage' Visa. When I first went to Thailand it was on a full 12 month 'retirement' Visa - back then maybe the get 90 days and then extend was not an option - either that or the Aust Embassy just did not list it for some reason (I checked my old paperwork from Embassy and it was not listed as an option - no 90 day 'retirement' Visa. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Faz said:

The answers for Thailand is to introduce a Health scheme for long term foreigners on annual extensions.

For those who may remember some years ago, foreigners were able to sign up to a Health Insurance scheme at their local Government hospitals and received a card 'Health Insurance for foreigners'.
You paid for a full medical check initially and an annual subscription fee, from memory it wasn't expensive, less than 4,00 THB for the medical and annual cover.

This scheme was only operated at government hospital establishments, not private hospitals.

However after a couple of years a government official spotted the government hospitals were incorrectly offering this service to 'all foreigners', when it was actually designed for foreign workers from Lao, Cambodia, Myanmar. It was then quickly ceased and unavailable to 'all foreigners'.
Medical Check-Ups and Health Insurance for Migrant Workers (prd.go.th)

In the days of Yingluck, the introduction of a government Health scheme for 'all foreigners' was actually discussed and proposed, but what happened next is history.

If there is any concern by the Thai government over the issue of unpaid hospital bills then the solution seems obvious and easy to established. Introduce a Health Insurance scheme all long term foreigners staying in Thailand can contribute into for treatment at Government hospitals, similar to the one for Lao, Cambodian, Myanmar workers.

For those foreigners who want to use private hospitals, private Health Insurance would still be an option, but a voluntary option, not compulsory.

Great idea Faz. I reckon a small annual fee (2000 Baht?) paid at extension time and then able to use Govt Hospitals.  If you want private hospital coverage then you can take out private insurance. Sounds reasonable - shall I sent it to Prayut or can you do it?😄 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Faz said:

The answers for Thailand is to introduce a Health scheme for long term foreigners on annual extensions.

For those who may remember some years ago, foreigners were able to sign up to a Health Insurance scheme at their local Government hospitals and received a card 'Health Insurance for foreigners'.
You paid for a full medical check initially and an annual subscription fee, from memory it wasn't expensive, less than 4,00 THB for the medical and annual cover.

This scheme was only operated at government hospital establishments, not private hospitals.

However after a couple of years a government official spotted the government hospitals were incorrectly offering this service to 'all foreigners', when it was actually designed for foreign workers from Lao, Cambodia, Myanmar. It was then quickly ceased and unavailable to 'all foreigners'.
Medical Check-Ups and Health Insurance for Migrant Workers (prd.go.th)

In the days of Yingluck, the introduction of a government Health scheme for 'all foreigners' was actually discussed and proposed, but what happened next is history.

If there is any concern by the Thai government over the issue of unpaid hospital bills then the solution seems obvious and easy to established. Introduce a Health Insurance scheme all long term foreigners staying in Thailand can contribute into for treatment at Government hospitals, similar to the one for Lao, Cambodian, Myanmar workers.

For those foreigners who want to use private hospitals, private Health Insurance would still be an option, but a voluntary option, not compulsory.

Yes this is a possible way forward and very practical. Make it a condition of 1 year extensions for any reason, I'd happilly pay 10/20k a year for peace of mind.

My wifes 95 year old father was from Myanmar and 2 years ago we paid 2700 Baht per annum for government hospital cover. As you can imagine at 95 he wasn't terribly healthy and that turned out to be very good value over his remaining life. No history required either and minimal paperwork (which was handy as he has had no papers for over 12 years after faking his own death).

Chanceing my arm I asked at the counter if I could have the same but was just met with a smile.

 

  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Saltire said:

My wifes 95 year old father was from Myanmar and 2 years ago we paid 2700 Baht per annum for government hospital cover.

From memory that sounds like the figure I paid for the annual Health Insurance and an initial 800 baht for the full medical check up.

Two years later when applying to renew it, I was told 'Sorry we make mistake, only for Lao, Cambodian, Myanmar workers, not for 'farang' expats'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, AussieBob said:

Great idea Faz. I reckon a small annual fee (2000 Baht?) paid at extension time and then able to use Govt Hospitals.  If you want private hospital coverage then you can take out private insurance. Sounds reasonable - shall I sent it to Prayut or can you do it?😄 

Grateful if you would kindly do it Bob.
I can get distract finding 'big boys pants' for some of the more 'naughty' members 🤭

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AussieBob said:

When I first went to Thailand it was on a full 12 month 'retirement' Visa - back then maybe the get 90 days and then extend was not an option -

Every Embassy may offer different Visa types to enter Thailand.
In your case (Australia) they only offer the Non Imm O-A for the purpose of retirement.
They only offer the single entry 90 day Non O single entry based on Thai family/spouse.

You can apply for a 1 year extension based on either retirement or Thai spouse from entry of a single entry Non O Visa, or indeed any Non Imm type Visa.

I think the Visa you are referring to is indeed the Non Imm O multiple entry Visa, which unfortunately is only available now from certain Embassies based on either retirement or Thai spouse.
These Visa types are valid for 1 year from the date of issue, but on entry to Thailand you are only granted permission of stay for 90 days. During that 1 year validity of the Visa, you had to cross a border and re-enter to obtain a further 90 day permission of stay.

On the basis of retirement, you had to cross a border every 90 days, but if you exited and re-enterd on the last day of that one year validity, you were still granted a stay of 90 days, even though the Visa expired the day after. It was therefore possible to stay in Thailand for up to almost 15 months, with 4 border runs.

On the basis of marriage, you have a further option to apply for a 60 day extension to that 90 days, to visit Thai spouse. You can therefore stay in Thailand for almost 17 months, with only 3 border runs and 3 x 60 day extensions (each extension 1,900 baht).

Whilst I hope this has been informative, we have strayed off topic to the original article regarding the Non O-A Visa and the mandatory Insurance requirement.

If anyone else has any questions about Visas, or extensions of sty (permits), please open a new topic here:
> Visas, Long Stay, Extensions, Re-entry Permit - Thaiger Talk (thethaiger.com)

And I'll do my best to explain and answer any questions.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It must be taken into account the double standards in hospital fees that are hugely more expensive than locals which does not occur in most countries due to racial laws..

Then the fact that most thai insurance do not reimberse westerners for different reasons with no recourse available.. 

And of course  the 800,000 baht  required in a thai bank with no interest  to ensure your o visa seems , plus the negative attitudes of bourocracy now make Thailand a joke for any expat... and pushes Thailand further into economic turmoil..

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Faz said:

The Non Imm O permits a stay of 90 days on entry. Within the last 30 days of that 90 days you can apply for an 1 year extension of stay based on retirement or Thai/spouse subject to meeting the financial requirements. Thereafter each and every year you apply to extend that stay for another year.

There is no limit on the number of times you can apply for that 1 year extension, that's how I and thousands of other foreigners stay in Thailand continually for years.

Whilst I think medical insurance is probably a good idea, as someone who is 50+, if the Non Imm O for 90 days can be extended for a year at a time, what is the point of the Non Imm O-A with all its extra requirements? Am I missing something?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By posting on Thaiger Talk you agree to the Terms of Use