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Thai customs and traditions that you would bring home to your country of origin


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Thai customs and traditions have interested me for a long time and the level of respect and togetherness as family units is to be applauded. 

The custom I have listed below, i would introduce in Ireland as nothing so rude as when people walk in front of you when you are chatting.
You will see the majority of Thais duck down slightly when passing in front of two people engaged in conversation. It’s a polite gesture of respect to acknowledge the interruption. The same gesture applies if you walk past a person and block their vision for even a split second.

What is the custom/traditions that you would bring home to your country of origin?

 

 

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Like you, Andrew, I like the Thai way of ducking to avoid blocking but, as regards bringing Thai customs & traditions to my home country, I think that would just be too much like cheating. Their ways are nice to observe, here in Thailand, but I don't think they'd get more than a curious glance if they tried it in any UK centre I can think of.

An interesting notion, nonetheless.

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A joint effort by my husband and I, have this to offer and would bring this mannerism back to London.

Do not place your feet on the table while sitting, do not point to anything with your feet and do not touch anybody with your feet.

 

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Ha-ha, Alice! You seem to have an anti-feet thing high on your agenda. Very funny, but it does make me ask if, in London, there is lots of feet-pointing and feet-touching. Definitely not a Lancashire mannerism . . . you'd get smacked in the gob for less than that!

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Top of my list of Thai customs and traditions, that i would bring back to Manchester is:

If you are invited to someone's home, it is considered polite to bring them a small gift of flowers or chocolates

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Oh, yes please

I'm a chocaholic . . . just love the stuff, pretty well any make, but I have to say that Cadburys is my favourite, either just plain 'Milk' or 'Fruit & Nut'.

See, I'm starting to dribble, just picturing those lovely purple wrappings . . . it's terrible!

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Welcome to the club King Cotton and chocolate is my downfall as I am a diabetic and will not learn!!!

Lindt would be my favorite brand and Yorkie bars and Galaxy Minstrels would be my top 2.

Going to sign off for dinner and a quick trip to the shops for some goodies (blame the ladies on the group)

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Bum guns ! 

Everyone ought to be taking bum guns home.   I do and most of my Kiwi or Aussie friends follow suit.  I usually install one or two in family members homes each time I return, by request, as they've seen and used them in Asia.

In Australia, if one is not a DIY'er, a licensed plumber will charge an arm and leg to install 'approved' equipment complete with non-return valves .... but that's the nanny state for you. 

 

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11 minutes ago, KaptainRob said:

complete with non-return valves

Hi, KR

Am I correct in assuming that the n-r valves would be to help lessen the unhygienic potential of bum guns being used carelessly, i.e. with amounts of you-know-what being left on the sprayer nozzle after use. I can't see a n-r valve preventing or even lessening that hazard.

Good topic, though (he said, smilingly!)

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Just now, King Cotton said:

Hi, KR

Am I correct in assuming that the n-r valves would be to help lessen the unhygienic potential of bum guns being used carelessly, i.e. with amounts of you-know-what being left on the sprayer nozzle after use. I can't see a n-r valve preventing or even lessening that hazard.

Good topic, though (he said, smilingly!)

You are correct in your assumption but Aus laws go beyond the absurd. 

It's fair enough for non-return valves to be installed in potable water supplies where a risk of syphoning may occur if the 'mains' supply pressure drops or is turned off.  To apply this regulation to a 'bum gun' would require one to accept that users might drop the said spray unit into the toilet bowl.  

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/29/2021 at 5:25 PM, Andrew Reeve said:

Thai customs and traditions have interested me for a long time and the level of respect and togetherness as family units is to be applauded. 

The custom I have listed below, i would introduce in Ireland as nothing so rude as when people walk in front of you when you are chatting.
You will see the majority of Thais duck down slightly when passing in front of two people engaged in conversation. It’s a polite gesture of respect to acknowledge the interruption. The same gesture applies if you walk past a person and block their vision for even a split second.

What is the custom/traditions that you would bring home to your country of origin?

The bowing thing only happens if you're seen to be on a higher rung of the ladder I've found.

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Buddhists believe that life does not begin with birth and end with death. The belief is that every person has several lives based upon life that has not yet lived and learned and acts committed in previous lives

 

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Agree totally with you JamesE and the fork and spoon to the rescue and would also add in the knife.

 

Fork and spoon are the main utensils, however noodles may be eaten with chopsticks, a knife is never used for Thai food

 

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On 6/25/2021 at 4:21 PM, Andrew Reeve said:

Agree totally with you JamesE and the fork and spoon to the rescue and would also add in the knife.

Knife?  That's what a spoon is for 5 5 5.

Trying to teach my wife and step-kids how to use a knife has been on of the most entertaining things I've done.

I'd take "shoes off" when you enter a house.  I'd follow the Korean custom of having slippers available for guests.

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