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Important rules and behaviours for driving in Thailand


Thaiger

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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

Absolutely not - you are making a major mistake about right of way.

In the EU the probity is from the right and most drivers are used to this is Thailand it is the geometry and the priority is from the LEFT. In Europe the priority from the right rule has lead to a lot of problems which were solved by putting up priority signs where this rule is "overruled". In Thailand the same problem but the other way round has not been properly addressed as there is no real signage and many UK drivers are unaware of the priority rule - that's why they keep saying "he just pulled out in front of me".

in UK it is usually from the right whereas Thailand is the opposite.

Most drivers in Thailand are NOT for the Uk either

There are exceptions to this.

At roundabouts in Thailand, traffic on the right is supposed to have priority (aka the right of way).

But yeah at intersections in Thailand priority goes the left. I would have thought in the UK it would be the same, but I have never driven nor studied the traffic code there. 

PS: This is just the rule - but don't arrive at an intersection and think that because you are on the left to another vehicle he is gonna let you through - it almost never happens. When I happen to be in this situation I mostly let them go, unless I clearly see they are stationary and actually letting me go.

Edited by ctxa
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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

I think you need to review your use of the word agenda.

but you seem to like putting words in my mouth.

You have room left?

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16 minutes ago, ctxa said:

There are exceptions to this.

At roundabouts in Thailand, traffic on the right is supposed to have priority (aka the right of way).

But yeah at intersections in Thailand priority goes the left. I would have thought in the UK it would be the same, but I have never driven nor studied the traffic code there. 

THi is one of the reasons why roundabouts are such a mess in Thailand - people don't understand that the priority on them is the OPPOSITE of the rest of the Thai road system.

In England there is not priority from the left and never has been so roundabouts are not a problem. UK has used roundabouts for decades - they are new here/

Obviously on roundabouts in the EU the priority is from the left and this required a major change in driving culture and signage. France now has more roundabouts than any other country.

the difference between EU and Thailand is road markings and signage. These are computer assessed and designed in the EU. In Thailand they are virtually non-existent and when they do appear they seem to have been drawn by a school kid - there is little or no evidence of traffic engineering at all. Lanes are senseless and markings and signs either inconsistent or absent altogether.

The village I lived in has a wonderful example of this - I lived on a long Soi. About halfway along a Sai joined from one side - it looked like a Y junction but in fact the SAI had right of way over the Soi. The only way you could see this was the road name - the little blue sign on a pole - one said Soi 5 the other SAI 5 and therefore had priority on the left.

Edited by Khunwilko
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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

Obviously on roundabouts in the EU the priority is from the left and this required a major change in driving culture and signage. France now has more roundabouts than any other country.

 

Priority to the left is only when entering the roundabout, cuz traffic is coming in a counter clockwise direction to you from the left always (obviously) .

 However keep in mind that In the EU priority is to the right once you are inside. Think of a two lanes roundabout, one is the inner lane another is the outer lane. Traffic on the outer lane has priority over traffic on the inner lane. 

In case a traffic on the inner lane wishes to exit the roundabout, but he can't due to traffic on the outer lane, he technically must go around until there's no traffic and he can switch lanes. (Many people in the EU would just slow down to allow for traffic on the outside to pass - but slowing down inside a roundabout is not recommended).

Edited by ctxa
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24 minutes ago, ctxa said:

I have never driven nor studied the traffic code there. 

I find it strange that people feel they can comment on Thai road law if they have never done this.

...and you have never DRIVEN?????

 

I've driven over half a million kilometres in Thailand and Laos

 

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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

I find it strange that people feel they can comment on Thai road law if they have never done this.

...and you have never DRIVEN?????

Why quote my words out of context??? Do you do this to piss people off? 

I'VE NEVER DRIVEN NOR STUDIED THE CODE IN THE UK. 

I said I thought the right of way in the UK would be to the left (same as Thailand), but then you proved me wrong and I accepted it cuz I 've never driven nor bothered to study the code in the UK. Doesn't mean I haven't studied Thai code nor driven here.

Edited by ctxa
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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

I find it strange that people feel they can comment on Thai road law if they have never done this.

...and you have never DRIVEN?????

I've driven over half a million kilometres in Thailand and Laos

In 3-4 years I've driven around 200k km in Thailand, and a bunch of those with a 600HP Mercedes-AMG E63 (that I daily drive). And trust me boy, you need a certain degree of skills to handle those horses and not end up spinning out or worse.

Edited by ctxa
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1 minute ago, ctxa said:

Why quote my words out of context??? Do you do this to piss off people? 

I'VE NEVER DRIVEN NOR STUDIED THE CODE IN THE UK

This says you have never driven in Thailand or studied the Code in Thailand - how is that a misquote?

How can they be out of context? It's EXACTLY what you said

Have you read the code or have you ever driven in Thailand.

7 minutes ago, ctxa said:

Priority to the left is only when entering the roundabout, cuz traffic is coming in a counter clockwise direction to you from the left always (obviously) .

 However keep in mind that In the EU priority is to the right once you are inside. Think of a two lanes roundabout, one is the inner lane another is the outer lane. Traffic on the outer lane has priority over traffic on the inner lane. 

In case a traffic on the inner lane wishes to exit the roundabout, but he can't due to traffic on the outer lane, he technically must go around until there's no traffic and he can switch lanes. (Many people in the EU would just slow down to allow for traffic on the outside to pass - but slowing down inside a roundabout is not recommended).

LANES!!! - you need to look at lane markings on roundabouts in the EU and then compare to Thailand.

- The road operate just about the exact mirror image in Thailand to EU as Thailand drives on the left with priority to the left. - EU drives on the right with priority to the right.

UK drives on the left with priority to the right - a different set up altogether.

So the way the traffic flows in Thailand is a mirror image of the EU.

But when it comes to lanes and signage  in Thailand, the fact is that it just isn't there or isn't up to the job.

Lanes on round about exist all over EU but are rare as rocking horse poop in Thailand

There are two basic designs in round about lanes depending on the layout of the roundabout. Multiple lanes can be a spiral layout or parallel lanes with filter marking in between exits - this allows driver to filter to the outside lane to exit. Obviously at entrance/exits the priority has to be to the right (in Thailand or left (in EU) or else no-one could exit the roundabout . There are rules about when you can and cannot filter. However none of this is possible on an unmarked roundabout.

BTW in the days when France didn't have roundabouts their cross roads were infamous for accidents - basically because EVERYBODY had RoW onto the roundabout and are would try and enter together with disastrous results.

In The EU you will also see  these signs in various languages - the priority to the right laws exist - they don't exist in UK.

In Thailand the law exists but there is no sign to indicate this.

Many drivers just assume they are on a "Major" priority road but in reality they aren't Thai drivers know this but many foreign drivers don't.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

This says you have never driven in Thailand or studied the Code in Thailand - how is that a misquote?

How can they be out of context? It's EXACTLY what you said

Have you read the code or have you ever driven in Thailand.

In the UK for gods sake. I've never driven in the UK nor studied traffic rules of the UK, cuz I am not British. And I've only been to the UK when I was like 12yo or so, so no need to drive in the UK. 

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31 minutes ago, ctxa said:

In 3-4 years I've driven around 200k km in Thailand, and a bunch of those with a 600HP Mercedes-AMG E63 (that I daily drive). And trust me boy, you need a certain degree of skills to handle those horses and not end up spinning out or worse.

Especially if you don't know the Highway Code!

You may think you need skills to drive a high powered car, but do they relate to defensive driving skills and Thailand?

Personally I'll never be old enough to own a Merc (apart from a couple of trucks)

You know my views on personal anecdote and driving a "big car" certainly doesn't add any strength to your argument.

 

Edited by Khunwilko
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1 hour ago, Khunwilko said:

You may think you need skills to drive a high powered car, but do they relate to defensive driving skills and Thailand?

Obviously not - to drive a high powered car you need to understand concepts such as understeer, oversteer, lift off oversteer (important), balance of the car (braking puts weight forward), trail braking, etc etc... 

As well as having some experience with correcting it once for one reason or another your rear breaks loose. There's only so much you can study about this. If you own a high powered car, better take it frequently to the track and practice all these things. Induce oversteer on purpose to get yourself familiar with countersteering etc etc...

AMG Driving Experiences all over the world are a fantastic way to have someone teach you basic skills to handle a high powered car safely. 

Edited by ctxa
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9 minutes ago, ctxa said:

In the UK for gods sake. I've never driven in the UK nor studied traffic rules of the UK, cuz I am not British. And I've only been to the UK when I was like 12yo or so, so no need to drive in the UK. 

I think you should take a nap and then read the posts properly.

why would I talk about the UK Highway Code when we're discussing doing in Thailand??

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2 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

why would I talk about the UK Highway Code when we're discussing doing in Thailand??

Because I initially made the wrong assumption that priority in the UK would be to the left as it is in Thailand, then you told me otherwise, and I excused my ignorance of UK traffic laws stating that I had never studied the UK traffic code before and so it was just a wrong assumption I had made. 
 

Edited by ctxa
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5 hours ago, ctxa said:

Because I initially made the wrong assumption that priority in the UK would be to the left as it is in Thailand, then you told me otherwise, and I excused my ignorance of UK traffic laws stating that I had never studied the UK traffic code before and so it was just a wrong assumption I had made. 
 

You are wasting your time dealing with Wilco, he reckons he knows it all on road use, but he knows nothing about the mindset and attitude of the folk in LOS regarding road use, which is the biggest problem here, other than no road policing. 🥴

 

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8 hours ago, Transam said:

You are wasting your time dealing with Wilco, he reckons he knows it all on road use, but he knows nothing about the mindset and attitude of the folk in LOS regarding road use, which is the biggest problem here, other than no road policing. 🥴

Latter part of the above may be true T, but please leave out the ad hominen stuff huh?

Heading your way today and in 600 kms I've enjoyed excellent roads and only a few idiots through the Lom Sak to Chumpae stretch. 

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10 hours ago, Transam said:

but he knows nothing about the mindset and attitude of the folk in LOS regarding road use, which is the biggest problem here,

I first came to Thailand in 1994 - which is when I first drove here.

I've lived in Thailand for nearly 20 years working with Thai people - not foreigners or teaching at a government school. 

I worked largely in the motor industry and am a member of a 4x4 group - the only fang in fact.

I speak conversational Thai

As I said earlier, I've driven half a million km in my own vehicles plus my motorcycles and hire vehicles on top

So I'd like to know what you are basing you petty insults on?

I guess it's a fat helping of Dunning Kruger.

Edited by Khunwilko
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16 hours ago, ctxa said:

In 3-4 years I've driven around 200k km in Thailand, and a bunch of those with a 600HP Mercedes-AMG E63 (that I daily drive). And trust me boy, you need a certain degree of skills to handle those horses and not end up spinning out or worse.

My hero. 

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14 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

I first came to Thailand in 1994 - which is when I first drove here.

I've lived in Thailand for nearly 20 years working with Thai people - not foreigners or teaching at a government school. 

I worked largely in the motor industry and am a member of a 4x4 group - the only fang in fact.

I speak conversational Thai

As I said earlier, I've driven half a million km in my own vehicles plus my motorcycles and hire vehicles on top

So I'd like to know what you are basing you petty insults on?

I guess it's a fat helping of Dunning Kruger.

What you have done or can do here has nothing to do with grasping the basics in LOS. You have learned nothing about the road use mindset here, face, wanting to be first, etc. I have..

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5 hours ago, Transam said:

What you have done or can do here has nothing to do with grasping the basics in LOS. You have learned nothing about the road use mindset here, face, wanting to be first, etc. I have..

Anyone can write that, but please give some examples of how you know so much more than I do about "the basics in LOS".

Lets have some examples either way to support your argument. Try not to be racist.

Edited by Khunwilko
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Note from the Moderators

Ok. Let's get back onto discussing the topic at hand and not comparing the size of our knowledge. 

Everyone is touched by different experiences and hence why opinions can differ. I have seen plenty of so called "experts" proven completely wrong and a similar number of the "uneducated" on a subject make silly remarks.

Moderator

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22 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

Anyone can write that, but please give some examples of how you know so much more than I do about "the basics in LOS".

Lets have some examples either way to support your argument. Try not to be racist.

Firstly, I am not a racist, I am actually married to an Asian, so please don't even think to go down that route, I am OK with spelling mistakes though....😉

How about, folk will not let you out of a side turning, they will edge bumper to bumper in traffic just so you can't get out.

Reversing, doing a three point turn, will they let you complete your manoeuvre, well I reckon 90% will try and get by you. 

Hows that for starters....😋

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3 hours ago, Transam said:

Firstly, I am not a racist, I am actually married to an Asian, so please don't even think to go down that route, I am OK with spelling mistakes though....😉

How about, folk will not let you out of a side turning, they will edge bumper to bumper in traffic just so you can't get out.

Reversing, doing a three point turn, will they let you complete your manoeuvre, well I reckon 90% will try and get by you. 

Hows that for starters....😋

While driving in the UK I see a road-side one accident on average about every five years or so.

I Thailand I come across one a week on average.

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7 hours ago, Transam said:

I am not a racist, I am actually married to an Asian,

Can't believe you resorted to that cliche.

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4 hours ago, JamesR said:

While driving in the UK I see a road-side one accident on average about every five years or so.

I Thailand I come across one a week on average.

Yet the number of collisions are about the same - how do you explain that?

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The plural of anecdote is not data.

Perceptions about “bad driving” are not scientific they are misleading. Unfortunately people don’t appreciate this.

When it comes to road safety – “seeing is believing” is most definitely NOT the case…..

The concept of “bad driving” is subjective and is tangential to solving the road safety problem – As the World Health Organisation Country Office for Thailand tells us If human fallibility is an unfortunate constant, we must work to make our road and traffic systems as safe as possible – this is the Safe System”

The Thailand Road Safety Master Plan 2018-2021 commits to broad Safe System/Towards Zero principles. Unfortunately although there are many who understand the reality of this concept, few in authority seem to want to enforce it or even understand it. As said the Safe System has been repeatedly mooted at road safety conferences in ASEAN and Thailand but until it is actually adopted – no significant changes will happen – we are left with the archaic thinking demonstrated over and over on this thread.

 

“During the last three decades research into road trauma prevention has evolved from a road user approach to a systems-based approach that is based on sound evidence. The Safe System approach to road safety consists of acknowledging the limitations of the human body to withstand physical force at the centre of road injury prevention, and recognizing crash responsibility should be shared by all those involved in the design, construction, operation and use of the transport system, especially designers” -  (WHO 2004).

 

The 2 main enemies of clear thinking on road safety are confirmation bias and cognitive dissonance…… It is important to overcome them….

 

Edited by Khunwilko
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