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Important rules and behaviours for driving in Thailand


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On 10/11/2021 at 1:40 AM, Shade_Wilder said:

What is the hand signal for backing up an off ramp onto the highway?

I have seen it done a few times, but missed the proper gesture...

I once drove a rental truck in a "developed nation" that like stalling semi-randomly. Sure enough, it stalled and would NOT restart on a massive incline over a mountain. I had to coast backwards across four lanes of traffic to get to the shoulder (the offramp was too far).

If it can happen in a nation with nuclear weapons why not elsewhere? 

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Just now, Vince said:

I once drove a rental truck in a "developed nation" that like stalling semi-randomly. Sure enough, it stalled and would NOT restart on a massive incline over a mountain. I had to coast backwards across four lanes of traffic to get to the shoulder (the offramp was too far).

If it can happen in a nation with nuclear weapons why not elsewhere? 

Most of the "bad driving" described by casual observers can be seen in every country in the world. 

(take a look at tube crash videos and they are largely China Russia and USA) 

Most accidents are the result of "human error" but one has to understand what that is.

 

What is “human error”?

Human error is not “bad driving”, it is a normal occurrence. It has been shown that human error falls largely into one of three principle categories[1].

 

First is a perceptual error. Critical information that is below the threshold for seeing - the light was too dim, the driver was blinded by the glare, or the pedestrian's clothes had low contrast. In other cases, the driver made a perceptual misjudgement (a curve's radius or another car's speed or distance). Or in Thailand, just tinted windows!

 

Second and far more common cause is that the critical information was detectable but that the driver failed to attend/notice because his mental resources were focussed elsewhere. Often times, a driver will claim that s/he did not "see" a plainly visible pedestrian or car. This is entirely possible because much of our information processing occurs outside of awareness. - (Mack and Rock, 1998)[2]

 

Third, the driver may correctly process the information but fail to choose the correct response ("I'm skidding, so I'll turn away from the skid") or make the correct decision yet fail to carry it out ("I meant to hit the brake, but I hit the gas"). 

 

[2] (Mack and Rock (1998) have shown that we can be less likely to perceive an object if we are looking directly at it than if it falls outside the centre of the visual field. This "inattentional blindness" phenomenon is certainly the cause of many RTIs)

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

I'm not sure what you man about pickups but on ALL roads world wide they re under the heading 4-wheeled private vehicles.

Yes I’m aware of the fact that pick ups are effectively under the heading 4-wheeled private vehicles. 
 

But you will see that in Thailand more road deaths occur in pick up than in other 4-wheeled private vehicles. This I believe happens because you can’t sit 20 fellas in the back of car. 
 

That’s what I meant by “excluding pick-ups”, it’s not that they belong to a different category than cars, it’s just that misusing them to sit people where they shouldn’t makes them more deadly in Thailand .

Edited by ctxa
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Just now, Khunwilko said:

Most of the "bad driving" described by casual observers can be seen in every country in the world. 

(take a look at tube crash videos and they are largely China Russia and USA) 

Most accidents are the result of "human error" but one has to understand what that is.

What is “human error”?

Human error is not “bad driving”, it is a normal occurrence. It has been shown that human error falls largely into one of three principle categories[1].

 

First is a perceptual error. Critical information that is below the threshold for seeing - the light was too dim, the driver was blinded by the glare, or the pedestrian's clothes had low contrast. In other cases, the driver made a perceptual misjudgement (a curve's radius or another car's speed or distance). Or in Thailand, just tinted windows!

 

Second and far more common cause is that the critical information was detectable but that the driver failed to attend/notice because his mental resources were focussed elsewhere. Often times, a driver will claim that s/he did not "see" a plainly visible pedestrian or car. This is entirely possible because much of our information processing occurs outside of awareness. - (Mack and Rock, 1998)[2]

 

Third, the driver may correctly process the information but fail to choose the correct response ("I'm skidding, so I'll turn away from the skid") or make the correct decision yet fail to carry it out ("I meant to hit the brake, but I hit the gas"). 

 

[2] (Mack and Rock (1998) have shown that we can be less likely to perceive an object if we are looking directly at it than if it falls outside the centre of the visual field. This "inattentional blindness" phenomenon is certainly the cause of many RTIs)

So the guy who parked his car in the pond and blamed gps....? 

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52 minutes ago, Vince said:

So the guy who parked his car in the pond and blamed gps....? 

As said single anecdotal events are not valid evidence.

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54 minutes ago, ctxa said:

But you will see that in Thailand more road deaths occur in pick up than in other 4-wheeled private vehicles. This I believe happens because you can’t sit 20 fellas in the back of car.

I'm aware that pickups can illegally carry passengers in the back etc but I can't find any statistics to suggest they account for a significant proportion of the deaths in 4-wheeled vehicles category.

There are concerns for the overall safety of pickups as opposed to sedans due to the nature of their construction - and large numbers on the roads of Thailand fall short of both passive and active safety features, They are essentially very old chassis design with high CoG and poor shock absorbing properties in an accident. however this category still compares positively with 4-wheeled stats for the USA.

Under "E" for engineering (vehicles) may vehicles in Thailand raise concerns in regards to safety and this may be an important factor in why the death rate to collision rate is so high in Thailand.

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10 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

As said single anecdotal events are not valid evidence.

Touché!

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3 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

I'm aware that pickups can illegally carry passengers in the back etc but I can't find any statistics to suggest they account for a significant proportion of the deaths in 4-wheeled vehicles category.

There are concerns for the overall safety of pickups as opposed to sedans due to the nature of their construction - and large numbers on the roads of Thailand fall short of both passive and active safety features, They are essentially very old chassis design with high CoG and poor shock absorbing properties in an accident. however this category still compares positively with 4-wheeled stats for the USA.

Under "E" for engineering (vehicles) may vehicles in Thailand raise concerns in regards to safety and this may be an important factor in why the death rate to collision rate is so high in Thailand.

The more I read your posts on the subject, the more I think you don't live/drive in LOS....🥴

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4 minutes ago, Transam said:

The more I read your posts on the subject, the more I think you don't live/drive in LOS....🥴

You may well be correct Khun Trans.  Pickups definitely add additional, disproportionate, death statistics to the annual toll despite no such dissemination of data.  We see the local news reports.

Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Mae Hong Son, Phetchabun and other mountainous regions have many such accidents usually caused by poor driver skill, inattention, drink, or overloading with pax in the tray along with building materials or similar. 

Isaan's dead straight roads, whilst extremely well built, see a large number of single-vehicle, usually pickups, going off road into trees or ditches due to driver inattention, fatigue or alcohol and often with farm labourers thrown out.

KW is correct in the sense that pickups (trucks, SUV's) are structurally unsafe compared with sedans, however the majority of deaths I see is for 1 or 2 in the front cabin and 4 or more in the tray.  3 dead, 1 injured in this one >

image.png.b8ef2381caac11f82de35338e6e0b209.png

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1 hour ago, KaptainRob said:

You may well be correct Khun Trans.  Pickups definitely add additional, disproportionate, death statistics to the annual toll despite no such dissemination of data.  We see the local news reports.

Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Mae Hong Son, Phetchabun and other mountainous regions have many such accidents usually caused by poor driver skill, inattention, drink, or overloading with pax in the tray along with building materials or similar. 

Isaan's dead straight roads, whilst extremely well built, see a large number of single-vehicle, usually pickups, going off road into trees or ditches due to driver inattention, fatigue or alcohol and often with farm labourers thrown out.

KW is correct in the sense that pickups (trucks, SUV's) are structurally unsafe compared with sedans, however the majority of deaths I see is for 1 or 2 in the front cabin and 4 or more in the tray.  3 dead, 1 injured in this one >

image.png.b8ef2381caac11f82de35338e6e0b209.png

Correct, KW has all the excuses, but did he forget to mention no police presence on most of Thai roads, so folk will behave themselves. To me it is the most important thing to curb road stupidity, in my opinion, plus the fines are too low to deter anyone...

In LOS, 3/4/5 kids on a bike, no problem, nobody cares, only when they get killed...😬

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7 hours ago, ctxa said:

Yes I’m aware of the fact that pick ups are effectively under the heading 4-wheeled private vehicles. 
 

But you will see that in Thailand more road deaths occur in pick up than in other 4-wheeled private vehicles. This I believe happens because you can’t sit 20 fellas in the back of car. 
 

That’s what I meant by “excluding pick-ups”, it’s not that they belong to a different category than cars, it’s just that misusing them to sit people where they shouldn’t makes them more deadly in Thailand .

Be careful.  Met might be on here in one of his many aliases.   55555555

Edited by Mynemesis
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Anybody that has driven on Thai roads must be a pretty bad drivers themselves if they think that the Thai drivers are capable, they are not. And before the usual chant of 'racist' get's shouted from the rooftops I would just like to say that it is not their fault, it is the complete system that is at fault.

Richard Barrow has made a good point when he says:

"In the UK, the majority of people fail their driving test the first time. In Thailand, most people pass the practical test first time. A Thai friend told me he failed his multiple choice theory test and the examiner told him to pay her 500 baht and she would do it for him."

And he goes to say:

"my wife had her first driving lesson on a tuesday. I went away the following day and by the time I came back on the sunday she had passed her test. Couldn't even back the car out of the drive."

These are not isolated incidents, it is the norm and anybody that cannot see this is a ........., you fill in the blank.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Marble-eye said:

Anybody that has driven on Thai roads must be a pretty bad drivers themselves if they think that the Thai drivers are capable, they are not. And before the usual chant of 'racist' get's shouted from the rooftops I would just like to say that it is not their fault, it is the complete system that is at fault.

Richard Barrow has made a good point when he says:

"In the UK, the majority of people fail their driving test the first time. In Thailand, most people pass the practical test first time. A Thai friend told me he failed his multiple choice theory test and the examiner told him to pay her 500 baht and she would do it for him."

And he goes to say:

"my wife had her first driving lesson on a tuesday. I went away the following day and by the time I came back on the sunday she had passed her test. Couldn't even back the car out of the drive."

These are not isolated incidents, it is the norm and anybody that cannot see this is a ........., you fill in the blank.

In the UK people die as well from road accidents. And specially if you check death rates for 4-wheeled private vehicles, death rate isn’t even that much lower in the UK compared to Thailand. 
 

I’ve seen Thais who drive better than you ever will and who have an amazing control of the cars balance, and Thais which switch lanes without even looking. You can’t generalize. But one thing is for sure, the huge number of road deaths here doesn’t come from cars, it comes from motorbikes.

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42 minutes ago, ctxa said:

In the UK people die as well from road accidents. And specially if you check death rates for 4-wheeled private vehicles, death rate isn’t even that much lower in the UK compared to Thailand. 
 

I’ve seen Thais who drive better than you ever will and who have an amazing control of the cars balance, and Thais which switch lanes without even looking. You can’t generalize. But one thing is for sure, the huge number of road deaths here doesn’t come from cars, it comes from motorbikes.

"I’ve seen Thais who drive better than you ever will and who have an amazing control of the cars balance"

You don't even know me, yet you know Thais that drive better than I ever will, it's a like me saying to you 'I know Thais that drive worse than you do' meaningless.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Marble-eye said:

"I’ve seen Thais who drive better than you ever will and who have an amazing control of the cars balance"

You don't even know me, yet you know Thais that drive better than I ever will, it's a like me saying to you 'I know Thais that drive worse than you do' meaningless.

I don’t need to know you in order to know that you aren’t Lewis Hamilton, and even if you were, Thailand has Alex Albon, right? 
 

See my point? You can’t generalize and say “all Thai drivers are X”, because it simply wouldn’t be true. There’s many kinds of drivers in Thailand and everywhere in the world indeed.
 

Just like with the story you said about your friend who couldn’t even back the car after passing the test, I’m sure it’s true, but I’m also sure it’s the exception and no the norm. Otherwise it would be impossible to drive in Thailand. And as someone who has put over 40k km in Thai roads within the last year alone I can tell you that’s not the case.

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1 minute ago, ctxa said:

I don’t need to know you in order to know that you aren’t Lewis Hamilton, and even if you were, Thailand has Alex Albon, right? 
 

See my point? You can’t generalize and say “all Thai drivers are X”, because it simply wouldn’t be true. There’s many kinds of drivers in Thailand and everywhere in the world indeed.
 

Just like with the story you said about your friend who couldn’t even back the car after passing the test, I’m sure it’s true, but I’m also sure it’s the exception and no the norm. Otherwise it would be impossible to drive in Thailand. And as someone who has put over 40k km in Thai roads within the last year alone I can tell you that’s not the case.

I have just twigged who you are, wilko over and out.

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people are making loads of statements totally unsupported by any evidence

 

 

Of course you will see pickup crashes in Thailand 2020, there are over 800,000 private trucks in Thailand. That’s a large portion of private 4-wheele vehicles. A few years back they were the numbering sellers.

That’s because they are made in Thailand and subsidised to help the industry.

The market and the industry is changing now towards cars.

The UK is a MUCH smaller market and some companies have stopped selling altogether – Nissan has packed up taking Merc/Renault with them

 

Edited by Khunwilko
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4 hours ago, Transam said:

Correct, KW has all the excuses, but did he forget to mention no police presence on most of Thai roads, so folk will behave themselves. To me it is the most important thing to curb road stupidity, in my opinion, plus the fines are too low to deter anyone...

In LOS, 3/4/5 kids on a bike, no problem, nobody cares, only when they get killed...😬

For once I have to agree with TA. Lack of police patrolling roads and enforcing regulations is a major reason why rules aren't followed. Traffic radar cameras only do so much. In the US you must be on the constant alert for patrols cars. It's easy to spot the cars zig zagging, or drunks weaving. I know it moderates my driving.

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1 hour ago, Marble-eye said:

I have just twigged who you are, wilko over and out.

I doubt it very much, but a good idea of yours to stop digging 😐

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24 minutes ago, LoongFred said:

For once I have to agree with TA. Lack of police patrolling roads and enforcing regulations is a major reason why rules aren't followed. Traffic radar cameras only do so much. In the US you must be on the constant alert for patrols cars. It's easy to spot the cars zig zagging, or drunks weaving. I know it moderates my driving.

And even when the police are driving along they often don’t seem to bother if you overtake them doing well over the speed limit

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2 minutes ago, Mynemesis said:

I doubt it very much, but a good idea of yours to stop digging 😐

It would appear that you are another that knows me better than I know myself.

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3 minutes ago, Marble-eye said:

It would appear that you are another that knows me better than I know myself.

Looks like you got a free second opinion. 🤣

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1 hour ago, Marble-eye said:

It would appear that you are another that knows me better than I know myself.

It wouldn't be at all hard to say who you are with just 5 or so adjectives. 

However, for the sake of not making a moderator waste time banning my account, I guess I won't write them in here.

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4 minutes ago, ctxa said:

It wouldn't be at all hard to say who you are with just 5 or so adjectives. 

However, for the sake of not making a moderator waste time banning my account, I guess I won't write them in here.

I have had Khunwilko on ignore now for quite a while and just for my own piece of mind you have joined him, hopefully I have killed one bird with two stones. 😀

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It'd be awfully nice to get to the end of a thread without some childish argument breaking out.

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