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My K Bank Experience


GMoney2312
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Just opened an account at K Bank today. I am an American with a Non Immigrant O Visa with multiple entry. After having them photo copy my passport and sign a couple of things yesterday, the appointment to actually get it done was today. The process took them 90 minutes- I was their first American at this branch(Seka, Bueng Kan). Two people working on it and often with another person on the phone helping them.

Then my Thai wife stepped up and it took her 15 minutes, of course.

Then the bank called us after we left. They missed a document for me to sign. They are actually going to drive to the house and get my signature. Wow, that is some service!💯

 

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  • 1 month later...

I've tried opening a bank account but they demanded that I get proof of thai address from immigration to proceed. 

I was leaving in few days later and I just gave up. 

I'm also American, married to Thai and I have a almost 4 year old kid. 

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On 10/31/2021 at 10:48 PM, Hussam said:

I've tried opening a bank account but they demanded that I get proof of thai address from immigration to proceed. 

I was leaving in few days later and I just gave up. 

I'm also American, married to Thai and I have a almost 4 year old kid. 

Most banks will now request proof of address, either in the form of a Yellow house book, or a residence certificate from Immigration, where you should have registered your place of residence.

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13 minutes ago, Faz said:

Most banks will now request proof of address, either in the form of a Yellow house book, or a residence certificate from Immigration, where you should have registered your place of residence.

@Faz > Many Immigration Offices won't  provide the Residence Certificate on simple request anymore, and want a 'formal request' for such residence certificate from the Thai agency that needs it for your business there.  So I presume that if your bank requires it for opening an account, that you would need to ask the bank for such 'formal request paper' in order to get it from the Thai Immigration Office.  Hopeless bureaucracy...

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Banks here are remarkably inconsistent as to what pieces of paper they want to open an account.

I have had an account with SCB head office in Bangkok for probably twenty years.  I don't remember what documents were required.

About 8 years ago I wanted to open an account with SCB in my local town.  They insisted I needed a work permit to do so.  I have never worked here and so I have never had a work permit.  No account.

This year I went to SCB in the provincial capital 30 kilometres away and they were happy to open an account for me.  The only document required was my passport.

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5 minutes ago, BlueSphinx said:

@Faz > Many Immigration Offices won't  provide the Residence Certificate on simple request anymore, and want a 'formal request' for such residence certificate from the Thai agency that needs it for your business there.  So I presume that if your bank requires it for opening an account, that you would need to ask the bank for such 'formal request paper' in order to get it from the Thai Immigration Office.  Hopeless bureaucracy...

The application form for a residence certificate only lists two reasons for requesting the certificate.
A Driving licence, or buying/selling a motorcycle or car.

In my experience if requesting a residence certificate for the purpose of opening a bank account (not listed), Immigration will issue a RC for that reason without a request from the bank.
In the event they did, it should be possible to obtain such a request from the bank anyway.

I had dealing with a member last week ( @Silky8) where the bank where requesting a Yellow book to open an account. I gave him some advice and he obtained a residence certificate from Immigration, which on return to the bank they accepted as proof of address.
https://thethaiger.com/talk/topic/7941-visa-appreciation-thank-you-thread/#comment-103428

 

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On 9/22/2021 at 1:20 PM, GMoney2312 said:

Just opened an account at K Bank today.

I opened an account at Bangkok Bank Eight years when I first got here. I was still high on "escaping" the USA. Then the very nice woman who was puzzled handed me a piece of paper and said "Do you know what this is for? I hope you know how. Must do" 

Americans all know what IRS forms look like. 

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26 minutes ago, Faz said:

The application form for a residence certificate only lists two reasons for requesting the certificate.
A Driving licence, or buying/selling a motorcycle or car.

In my experience if requesting a residence certificate for the purpose of opening a bank account (not listed), Immigration will issue a RC for that reason without a request from the bank.
In the event they did, it should be possible to obtain such a request from the bank anyway.

I had dealing with a member last week ( @Silky8) where the bank where requesting a Yellow book to open an account. I gave him some advice and he obtained a residence certificate from Immigration, which on return to the bank they accepted as proof of address.
https://thethaiger.com/talk/topic/7941-visa-appreciation-thank-you-thread/#comment-103428

Thanks for this clarification.

So my takeaway from this is that I should NOT have told my SiSaKet Immigration Office that I needed the Residence Certificate to apply for a driving license.  Because they wanted a formal request form from the DLT in order to provide it to me, thus forcing me to go to the DLT for that request form, then with the request form back to Immigration Office where they provide me the Residence Certificate, and then back again to the DLT. 

I should have simply requested the Residence Certificate and when they asked for the reason should have answered me wanting to open another bank-account at a different Bank than the one I currently have.  Would have saved me 1/2 day of form-chasing...  As I wrote > senseless bureaucracy...

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This topic is dear to my heart. Sorry for the length of this post.  As a general rule, people who have lived here for a while will know that individual immigration offices seem to have the latitude to interpret the rules as they see fit.  This flexibility happens to be convenient when determining the amount of "tea money" that may be required for a particular service.

So, when is a foreign national living in Thailand considered a "foreign resident"?  This comes into play in relation to the new Covid regulations, summarised by the Dept of Consular Affairs as follows:

"Fully-vaccinated visitors from the [now 63] listed countries are required to have stayed at least 21 days in one or more of those countries before travelling to Thailand.  For fully-vaccinated Thais and foreign residents who travel to one of the [63] countries for a shorter period of time such as for a three-day meeting, they are not required to spend at least 21 days in the eligible countries."

Back in September, I sought a residence certificate at the Immigration Bureau (IMPACT Branch), and was duly informed that the application form for a residence certificate lists only two reasons for requesting the certificate: A Driving licence, or buying/selling a motorcycle or car -- as clearly stated in the post above.  

One can apply for this simple certificate/letter using a form that says "Application for Residence Certificate" and pay anywhere from 200-500 Baht (or more), depending on urgency.  However, my newfound understanding is that: despite the unambiguous title of the application form, it is not the same as an 'official' Residence Certificate, which requires a different process and costs many many thousands of Baht and comes with a hard-bound cover.  (I have seen photos of it online.)

The particular supervisor I encountered declined to indicate any other purpose on my so-called residence certificate (letter), although she was "kind enough" to provide this worthless (to me) piece of paper within an hour -- for a substantial extra fee of course.

So, the questions that remain for me are: (1) Is it really true that, upon request, some immigration offices will modify the so-called residence certificate for a clearly-stated different purpose (eg. bank account opening or exemption from the "21-day rule") -- either freely or with some added inducement?

(2) Who can actually benefit from the exemption to the 21-day rule that I mention above?  Only "genuine" foreign residents who have paid many thousands of Baht for a "real" Residence Certificate?  Or does the definition generously include the rest of us mere mortals who have lived here for 20 years, with Thai spouse, Thai Taabien Baan, Thai ID and Thai drivers licence etc.?

I  would be happy to hear from anyone who has already tested the exemption to the "21-day rule" as an "ordinary Joe" foreign resident, successfully or otherwise.

 

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On 9/22/2021 at 1:20 PM, GMoney2312 said:

Just opened an account at K Bank today

Did they require a certificate of residence form? 

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26 minutes ago, BlueSphinx said:

I should have simply requested the Residence Certificate and when they asked for the reason should have answered me wanting to open another bank-account at a different Bank than the one I currently have.  Would have saved me 1/2 day of form-chasing...  As I wrote > senseless bureaucracy...

No.

In the early days, I recall the residence certificates were very basic, two or three lines merely confirming your address and without any enforcement of even completing the application form, just making a verbal request was sufficient.

Then some foreigners started to abuse the system (Immigrations words).
This led not only to some IO's requesting a request from the DLT or dealership, but the residency letters issued by Immigration became very specific to the reasons of issuance. For example;
Mr xxxxx has requested proof of address for the purpose of DL/purchase car/motorcycle/ open bank account and we confirm his registered address is xxxxxxxxxxxx.

This prevented a CR issued for the purpose of obtaining a DL being used to open a bank account.

I recall the day after I arrived in Thailand for retirement purposes, I opened a bank account with just my Passport and a copy of the landlady's TB and ID card. I used further copies and Passport to file the TM30 and requested a residence certificate to purchase a motorcycle. (I was already aware the dealership required such to register the motorcycle in my name).
TM30 filed, bank account opened and new motorcycle purchased all in the same day.
The following day I obtained my Thai driving licences using a copy of the 'residence certificate' issued the previous day. How times have changed since those days.

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1 hour ago, NCC1701A said:

I opened an account at Bangkok Bank Eight years when I first got here. I was still high on "escaping" the USA. Then the very nice woman who was puzzled handed me a piece of paper and said "Do you know what this is for? I hope you know how. Must do" 

Americans all know what IRS forms look like. 

I just recently updated at one of my banks with new passport as I had to get the yearly immigration bank paper, and out of the blue I was hit with that paper needing my SS number and signature. It did two things, made me nervous as having to give out my number, and severely ticked me off that I had to give the bank my number and that that agency has to be in everyone's business. I thought FBAR filing should be good enough, but nooooooooo.

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16 minutes ago, jsk said:

Back in September, I sought a residence certificate at the Immigration Bureau (IMPACT Branch), and was duly informed that the application form for a residence certificate lists only two reasons for requesting the certificate: A Driving licence, or buying/selling a motorcycle or car -- as clearly stated in the post above.  

One can apply for this simple certificate/letter using a form that says "Application for Residence Certificate" and pay anywhere from 200-500 Baht (or more), depending on urgency.  However, my newfound understanding is that: despite the unambiguous title of the application form, it is not the same as an 'official' Residence Certificate, which requires a different process and costs many many thousands of Baht and comes with a hard-bound cover.  (I have seen photos of it online.)

The application form for a residence certificate' is old and only listed those two reasons because in each case the DLT or dealership required your 'registered' address for documentary purposes. For Driving licence details, or for vehicle registration details. At that time, you could open a bank account with your Passport and a copy of the hose masters Tabien Baan and ID card as proof of address.
Banks have now become more 'particular' regarding proof of address and many will only accept an address either registered with Immigration (RC) or an Amphoe (Yellow book).

As for your second paragraph your confusing a 'residence certificate', with a 'certificate of residence' when applying for 'permanent residency' status.

26 minutes ago, jsk said:

So, the questions that remain for me are: (1) Is it really true that, upon request, some immigration offices will modify the so-called residence certificate for a clearly-stated different purpose (eg. bank account opening or exemption from the "21-day rule") -- either freely or with some added inducement?

Immigration can and do issue 'residence certificates' for the purpose of opening a bank account, they just never got around to updating the application form.

28 minutes ago, jsk said:

(2) Who can actually benefit from the exemption to the 21-day rule that I mention above?  Only "genuine" foreign residents who have paid many thousands of Baht for a "real" Residence Certificate?  Or does the definition generously include the rest of us mere mortals who have lived here for 20 years, with Thai spouse, Thai Taabien Baan, Thai ID and Thai drivers licence etc.?

No idea what 21 day exemption rule your referring to.
Can you provide a link?

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19 minutes ago, Faz said:

The application form for a residence certificate' is old and only listed those two reasons because in each case the DLT or dealership required your 'registered' address for documentary purposes. For Driving licence details, or for vehicle registration details. At that time, you could open a bank account with your Passport and a copy of the hose masters Tabien Baan and ID card as proof of address.
Banks have now become more 'particular' regarding proof of address and many will only accept an address either registered with Immigration (RC) or an Amphoe (Yellow book).

As for your second paragraph your confusing a 'residence certificate', with a 'certificate of residence' when applying for 'permanent residency' status.

Immigration can and do issue 'residence certificates' for the purpose of opening a bank account, they just never got around to updating the application form.

No idea what 21 day exemption rule your referring to.
Can you provide a link?

Resident certificate vs. Certificate of residence.  That's what I figured, but the seemingly unambiguous title of the form used by the Immigration Bureau is not helpful.  The  issue of being exempt from the requirement to have stayed 21 days in one of the "eligible 63 countries" is mentioned in a Bangkok Post article from 29 October, but the 21-day rule also existed under the old COE system: https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/2206023/rules-for-travellers-set-to-be-clarified.

I presume that the exemption for "foreign residents" really means "permanent residents", but the TAT never explains that in any of its loosely-worded promotional propaganda.  As I read it, this effectively means that if an "ordinary" fully-vaccinated long-term resident were to leave Thailand for only short period of time, they would be subject to some (unspecified) quarantine period on return, if they hadn't stayed for the minimum 21 days (even) in an eligible country.  This ambiguous rule seems nonsensical in the case of foreign nationals living in Thailand for many years, but "permanent residents" need not worry (about coming back without having met the minimum 21-day requirement).  I suspect that some Embassies/Consulates may be inclined to interpret the rule sympathetically, but it is equally possible to encounter ones that are obtuse -- based on personal experience with a previous COE application.

I'm not clear on the logic or presumed efficacy of the 21-day rule -- in relation to fully-vaccinated, multiple PCR-tested individuals -- and I suspect that ignorance applies also to 99.99% of the officials who are instructed to apply it blindly (and maybe even to the ones who dreamed it up).

 

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1 hour ago, jsk said:

I presume that the exemption for "foreign residents" really means "permanent residents", but the TAT never explains that in any of its loosely-worded promotional propaganda. 

Correct. It does indeed mean those with 'permanent residency' status.
They are treated very much like a Thai for entry purposes, but in order to keep their PR status they need a re-entry permit before departing Thailand, otherwise they lose their PR status.

 

1 hour ago, jsk said:

I'm not clear on the logic or presumed efficacy of the 21-day rule -- in relation to fully-vaccinated, multiple PCR-tested individuals -- and I suspect that ignorance applies also to 99.99% of the officials who are instructed to apply it blindly (and maybe even to the ones who dreamed it up).

You can stay in any number of the 'eligible' Countries for the 21 days. 
!0 days here, another 11 there. That has already been confirmed.
The PCR test result must be issued within 72 hours of your departure point though. It's possible you may be able to stay overnight in a different Country en route, provided your PCR test is within the time limit.

Logic dictates that Thailand is itself an 'eligible' Country, therefore if you went for just a 14 day break to Dubai, the fact you spent the previous 7 days in Thailand would be inclusive of the 21 day rule.

If I'm not mistaken and I stand to be corrected, when completing the TP application your only asked where you've resided for the previous 14 days.

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44 minutes ago, Faz said:

Logic dictates that Thailand is itself an 'eligible' Country, therefore if you went for just a 14 day break to Dubai, the fact you spent the previous 7 days in Thailand would be inclusive of the 21 day rule.

Yes, according to farang logic, that's how I would (like to) interpret it also; but some gatekeepers who read the rules with blinders on may have other ideas.   If the exemption is meant to apply to "permanent residents", as I'm pretty sure it does, I wouldn't like to have to argue my "logical" case (as a non-permanent resident) with someone who doesn't appreciate the logic. 

Anyway, if the AI of the TP is looking mainly at vaccination status and country eligibility, perhaps this is nothing to worry about.  I think you're right about the 14 days. 

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On 11/13/2021 at 3:22 AM, Faz said:

The application form for a residence certificate only lists two reasons for requesting the certificate.
A Driving licence, or buying/selling a motorcycle or car.

In my experience if requesting a residence certificate for the purpose of opening a bank account (not listed), Immigration will issue a RC for that reason without a request from the bank.
In the event they did, it should be possible to obtain such a request from the bank anyway.

I had dealing with a member last week ( @Silky8) where the bank where requesting a Yellow book to open an account. I gave him some advice and he obtained a residence certificate from Immigration, which on return to the bank they accepted as proof of address.
https://thethaiger.com/talk/topic/7941-visa-appreciation-thank-you-thread/#comment-103428

Yes with the help of @Faz and his knowledge, I asked the local Immigration dept for a residence certificate, which they typed a letter to the bank, detailing my name, passport number and local address.  When I presented this to the local Bangkok bank they opened the account no problem.

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On 11/13/2021 at 9:37 AM, Faz said:

Most banks will now request proof of address, either in the form of a Yellow house book, or a residence certificate from Immigration, where you should have registered your place of residence.

or work permit. That still works.

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On 9/22/2021 at 1:20 PM, GMoney2312 said:

Then my Thai wife stepped up

Keep the wife away from your bank account just a piece of friendly advice.
However I would never deal with K Bank anyways, my top 3:
1. Krungsi
2. Krungthai
3. Bangkokbank

Neither of these should need your Thai wife to deal on your behalf and you can if things go wrong at-least know that your account doesn't end up emptied (ok this needs the bankbook + atm-card to be kept away from your house or in a safe the wife can't access.

Good luck with your KBank account.

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Been with K-bank now for the past four years where I switched to from SCB after my divorce.  However, during my marriage to my now ex-wife anytime I needed to do something at SCB  for my retirement account and extension documentation they required my wife's permission, and she had to be there with me. Insanity as the account I used for my retirement was in my name only and she was only on the joint account for everyday use as she deposited her paycheck into it as well as I when transferring money into the account to make the Truck payment.

When I opened up the K-Bank account originally I only showed my Yellow Book, and Pink ID card.  Nothing was asked regarding my passport back then as I was on a Non Imm O visa and extension of stay based upon that.  However, last year when went and opened up my new Fixed deposit account, and deposited 800k into it, they wanted my passport, and would not look at the yellow book or Pink ID.  When I asked the branch manager why the difference she indicated that I was no longer married to a Thai, lived not where my house is (which is in the daughters name now), and since I was now retired they needed to see the O-A visa I had come into the country on in 2019.  No certificate of residence.  To change the address on the original savings account took another stack of papers, and then I was given the wonderful new form for the US government as NCC has indicated.  Up until now I had only filed the FBAR one time.  Now the FBAR is done every year.  

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On 11/16/2021 at 2:21 PM, Shark said:

Keep the wife away from your bank account just a piece of friendly advice.

If you can't trust the wife with your bank account, keep the account, change the wife!

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10 minutes ago, Faz said:

If you can't trust the wife with your bank account, keep the account, change the wife!

If she's then Thai you end up with and no bank account and no wife.

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On 11/16/2021 at 2:21 PM, Shark said:

However I would never deal with K Bank anyways, my top 3:
1. Krungsi
2. Krungthai
3. Bangkokbank

Funny enough the SIL is an assistant manager at Krungthai.

Her recommendations for foreigner friendly banks were;
1. Bangkok bank.
2. Kasikorn bank.

With the problems some foreigners face with opening bank accounts, as an experiment I tried to open an account at the local Krungthai bank a couple of years ago. Armed with Passport, Yellow Tabien Baan and evidence of two existing account with Bangkok bank, they insisted 'no work permit, no account'.

After 30 minutes of explaining I'm retired and don't work, I then casually dropped the name of their assistant manger and the fact I was her BIL and she would be most disappointed as she'd recommend them (false). The whole demeanour changed and suddenly they couldn't do enough.
Sometimes it's not what you know, but who you know.
 

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