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Who is the best car manufacturer and can you buy their cars in Thailand?


Smithydog
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1 minute ago, Bob20 said:

European reports have shown Mazda to be the most reliable cars for quite a few years. I've driven a 323, 2 626's, 5 MX5's and an RX8 and I have to agree. None ever let me down nor gave me any expense other than regular service.

I think any manufacturer will have a lemon or lemons, our Thai friend bought a new Mazda 2 or 3, it keeps going back to the dealers with electrical problems. 

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2 minutes ago, Transam said:

I think any manufacturer will have a lemon or lemons, our Thai friend bought a new Mazda 2 or 3, it keeps going back to the dealers with electrical problems. 

Tell him to put petrol in, it's not an EV! 🥴

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On 9/22/2021 at 3:38 PM, Transam said:

With respect, did you mean Toyota Fortuner..🤭

We looked at this one, it was so huge when we got to the showroom. Decided on the Toyota Cross- a mini SUV hybrid.

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On 9/22/2021 at 4:01 AM, Smithydog said:

I grew up us a Ford man because my dad was one.

Clearly not a critical thinker than.

 

Jag? The best days to own a Jag? the day  you buy it and the day you sell it.

 

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Toyota pickups sell at a premium I'm Thailand. The Hi-lux/Vigo, Fortuner and Inova were all basically the same vehicle chassis and mechanicals designed for production in relatively lo-tech factories in S.E Asia

They are undoubtedly reliable to the point of being bullet-proof. Even a 20 year old Tiger will attract people coming up to you in the street trying to buy it..

 

the reality is that most pickups in Thailand are pretty bullet proof.

 

pricing and import duty in Thailand severely narrows the range of vehicles available - basically there are ones made in Thailand a few from Asean and some TKDs that are grossly overpriced.

 

If Thailand ever opens its doors to cheaper imports the whole market would change - you might even find road safety improves. At present though the Thai motor industry is doing very well out of a combination of exports and home market - but they need to change to keep up with the times.

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3 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

Clearly not a critical thinker than.

Jag? The best days to own a Jag? the day  you buy it and the day you sell it.

Growing up in Australia not much need for it. At that time we only had 2 choices for most.... a Ford or a Holden. 

The uber rich could drive some fancy imported car. I believed Dad picked a Ford simply because he preferred the way they were engineered at the time. After all, he was an aircraft engineer so was interested in mechanics.

Yes later, dad bought a Mitsubishi Colt and mum had a Mini as the family pickup vehicle.

The dream of owing a Jag was strong in my early years but that died down as I realised that it was a British car built only on advertising hot air with no substance! Like so many things British through my teens and later.😁

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41 minutes ago, Smithydog said:

Growing up in Australia not much need for it. At that time we only had 2 choices for most.... a Ford or a Holden. 

The uber rich could drive some fancy imported car. I believed Dad picked a Ford simply because he preferred the way they were engineered at the time. After all, he was an aircraft engineer so was interested in mechanics.

Yes later, dad bought a Mitsubishi Colt and mum had a Mini as the family pickup vehicle.

The dream of owing a Jag was strong in my early years but that died down as I realised that it was a British car built only on advertising hot air with no substance! Like so many things British through my teens and later.😁

What era was that...?

I thought all rides were and still are sold on "Hot air", look at the Chinese MG....😋

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39 minutes ago, Transam said:

What era was that...?

I thought all rides were and still are sold on "Hot air", look at the Chinese MG....😋

They are quite often.... it is why trust in car salespeople has never been high due to the way they are portrayed (and for some how they act!) ..... ha ha

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5 hours ago, Transam said:

What era was that...?

I thought all rides were and still are sold on "Hot air", look at the Chinese MG....😋

Don't underestimate MG - they are the fastest growing brand in Oz.....in the next 5 years they will totally dominate most markets - and like other "new" car manufacturing countries, their product will dramatically improve.

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6 hours ago, Smithydog said:

Growing up in Australia not much need for it. At that time we only had 2 choices for most.... a Ford or a Holden. 

The uber rich could drive some fancy imported car. I believed Dad picked a Ford simply because he preferred the way they were engineered at the time. After all, he was an aircraft engineer so was interested in mechanics.

Yes later, dad bought a Mitsubishi Colt and mum had a Mini as the family pickup vehicle.

The dream of owing a Jag was strong in my early years but that died down as I realised that it was a British car built only on advertising hot air with no substance! Like so many things British through my teens and later.😁

I lived in Ozfrom the 90s to the 2000s and had a couple of Fords and a Vintage Holden, but by then it was Toyota and Mitsu who were taking over both saloons and utes. It was clear that Oz was not going to last, they simply didn't have product.

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1 minute ago, Khunwilko said:

Don't underestimate MG - they are the fastest growing brand in Oz.....in the next 5 years they will totally dominate most markets - and like other "new" car manufacturing countries, their product will dramatically improve.

Perhaps cheap rides in Oz always do well...........😋

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On 9/23/2021 at 10:24 AM, JamesE said:

"There's no such thing as a free dog."

But Tesla is a very dog-friendly company. Go and test drive a $100K Model S and the response is "Of course you can take your dog on the ride." The car even comes with "Dog Mode" where you can leave the A/C on for little poochie while you go run errands. The display screen shows:

tesla-dog-omde-and-buster.jpg

Thought you were talking about free hot dogs....

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2 hours ago, Khunwilko said:

I lived in Ozfrom the 90s to the 2000s and had a couple of Fords and a Vintage Holden, but by then it was Toyota and Mitsu who were taking over both saloons and utes. It was clear that Oz was not going to last, they simply didn't have product.

Product was one item. But I am sure that there were other factors as well. This included the continuing shift to no tariffs on cars made in production facilities in Asia. Also lower production costs simply because of the substantially lower wage costs than Australian Manufacturing greatly affected profit margins. In addition, a vastly smaller market for new cars, due to a low population, that was now swamped by tariff free overseas brands and low export volumes would have had an influence.

All this combined saw the inevitable end of car production in Australia.

Recent stats show 45 brands selling cars in Australia in August of this year.

https://www.carexpert.com.au/car-news/vfacts-australias-car-sales-for-august-2021-detailed

Even removing cross ownership of brands, in my opinion, when compared to 1980s you will likely find far less brands (probably including a brand or two that also doesn't exist anymore).

 

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I do my part for the environment by only using this trusty classic when needed.

Wait till someone i don't like to come near before i start it up.   DIESEL   at its best worst 

Isuzu .         For cars,  always Toyota 

my truck .jpg

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Nissan Kicks e-Power hybrid. The engine is manufactured here in Thailand. I have one and like it, but not for its roominess or creature features. I bought it for its economy and for its smaller carbon footprint. It gets decent gas mileage even with my heavy foot.

My most recent cars included a 2020 Mini Cooper, a 2018 Range Rover Velar, a 2015 Nissan GT-R, and a 2014 Nissan Titan Pro-4x. Now I just have the Kicks and a Yamaha Grand Filano. That's all I need here.

 

My only complaint is the ignition key could be a bit smaller.

1621844779784.~2.jpg

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8 hours ago, Smithydog said:

continuing shift to no tariffs on cars made in production facilities in Asia.

the vehicles made in Oz were also part of reciprocal FT arrangements with Asia but nobody wanted them. They also had to manufacture Japanese vehicles in Oz.......like Thailand - but they failed to export.

even manistream Holdens and Ford were using imported designs , engines mechanics etc. In fact is was Ford got the credit for building the "most Australian" cars, but without exports they were flogging a dead horse.

Production costs were lower only partly because of wages - (the wages thing is actually  bit of a cliche)  the truth is that such vehicles as the Toyota Vigo/Fortuner/Inova were essentially a one vehicle platform designed to be built in high volume in low tech factories. Thailand is only now upgrading to higher tech production. Australia had virtually no export matrket for their own vehicles and only a tiny home market.

E.G. Thailand had a home market in a population of 70 million, Australia 22million - they had to export a product or die.

Oz o=fcourse like other countries in the 70s and 80s tried to protect their home market but this can only go on for so long - Thailand is facing a similar problem - but as their motor industry is around 10th largest in the world they are in a better position nd they have product.

without a significant home industry, Oz market will be entirely imported vehicles - they need FT agreements to keep the prices reasonable - it is very unlikely any major foreign manufacturers will set up new big facilities in Oz the logistics just don't make sense

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Toyota has developed a competitive edge through the use and growth of the Toyota Production System. It has become an area of study for those companies looking to apply "systems thinking" management theory like Lean.

Their policy of waster elimination and focus on quality has no doubt helped them to become one of the most consistently profitable car manufacturers in the world. Their quality has been shown in the "Unbreakable" Toyota Hi-Lux as an example.

https://global.toyota/en/company/vision-and-philosophy/production-system/

Does this make them "the best"? Some would say so. However as personal influences on a decision about "best" can vary, it is usually hard to reach a solely objective opinion on one. In my opinion, over a long term period, they have demonstrated their ability to be up there for sure. But do more design innovative car manufacturers deserve similar accolades?

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Toyota's engineering design reliability is legendary, their success is based on it.

I was watching a film the other night, I think the scene was in New York, the thing that stuck out was that  most of the Yellow Cabs were Toyota's....😊

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On 9/23/2021 at 6:32 AM, Transam said:

I think any manufacturer will have a lemon or lemons, our Thai friend bought a new Mazda 2 or 3, it keeps going back to the dealers with electrical problems. 

Jut talking in terms of "brands" is going to run into problems - cars are built in different factories all over the world and inevitably production quality may vary, no matter how much the company tries to achieve uniformity. Also certain models may have inherent design faults or climate may affect their long term viability.

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4 hours ago, Smithydog said:

Toyota has developed a competitive edge through the use and growth of the Toyota Production System. It has become an area of study for those companies looking to apply "systems thinking" management theory like Lean.

Their policy of waster elimination and focus on quality has no doubt helped them to become one of the most consistently profitable car manufacturers in the world. Their quality has been shown in the "Unbreakable" Toyota Hi-Lux as an example.

https://global.toyota/en/company/vision-and-philosophy/production-system/

Does this make them "the best"? Some would say so. However as personal influences on a decision about "best" can vary, it is usually hard to reach a solely objective opinion on one. In my opinion, over a long term period, they have demonstrated their ability to be up there for sure. But do more design innovative car manufacturers deserve similar accolades?

Toyota's Len line production system is now used in industry all over the world and not just in the motor industry. It is undoubtedly a major factor in their success. 

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