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News Forum - Hungarian woman arrested in Koh Samui for 10-year overstay


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A Hungarian woman was arrested in Koh Samui by Surat Thani Immigration Police for a visa overstay… of more than 4,000 days. The woman admitted to having travelled to Thailand in November of 2009 on a tourist visa and then stayed with her husband without ever bothering to apply for any visa or extension. The woman’s visa expired at the end of February in 2010 and she stayed illegally for more than 10 years in Thailand. The Thaiger is not identifying her details other than to say she is a Hungarian national, though Thai media identified her by name and […]

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Another story that reminds me about the late Alan Paterson in Nong Khai who used to 'sort out' visa overstays.
Twenty-odd years ago there were two Americans, father and son. They both lived somewhere isolated at the back-end of nowhere in Thailand.
The father was a Vietnam veteran who never went home. His son came out to Thailand to join his father. The father had a twenty-year overstay, his son a mere ten years.

Alan Paterson got them both to come to Nong Khai, give themselves up to the police, then appear in court the next day. They were fined the maximum ( I think it was 10,000 Baht then).
Then the immigration had to been seen to do their job, so escorted them to the newly-opened bridge to Laos. They cleared immigration into Laos, turned round and came back to Thailand, getting a 30 day visa waiver.
It cost them a heck of a lot for Alan to pay everyone off so they could return 'clean' men.

There was another guy, a European who had a ten-year overstay. He was a professional horse trainer working in Kanchanaburi when his work permit and visa expired. He just stayed on, and no one from immigration chased him. The other thing, he was a chronic alcoholic.
He came to Nong Khai, was told to spend the night in the guest house and in next morning Alan would take him to court, pay the fine, go to Laos and come back.

Only thing was he didn't stay in the guest house for the night, but went and got blotto in a few bars. Next morning, he couldn't go to court.
Alan paid the local police to "arrest" him (really!) and lock him in a cell for twenty-four hours to get him sober.
Then the morning after a night in the cell, the police took him to court for the same rigmarole  the two Americans went through.

The days when overstay could just be cleared by paying off the judge and immigration.

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Quote

Those who surrender for an overstay of fewer than 5 years face a 5-year ban, while anyone caught (not surrendering) with an overstay of more than 1 year face the full 10-year ban.

Schengen visa is 3 for 3. Get a visa for 3 months but then you're not allowed to renew your visa for a 3 months period.

Wish they took an example from Thailand with the offer of a 5 year on and off option between Thailand and EU.

 

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4 minutes ago, Bluesofa said:

Another story that reminds me about the late Alan Paterson in Nong Khai who used to 'sort out' visa overstays.
Twenty-odd years ago there were two Americans, father and son. They both lived somewhere isolated at the back-end of nowhere in Thailand.
The father was a Vietnam veteran who never went home. His son came out to Thailand to join his father. The father had a twenty-year overstay, his son a mere ten years.

Alan Paterson got them both to come to Nong Khai, give themselves up to the police, then appear in court the next day. They were fined the maximum ( I think it was 10,000 Baht then).
Then the immigration had to been seen to do their job, so escorted them to the newly-opened bridge to Laos. They cleared immigration into Laos, turned round and came back to Thailand, getting a 30 day visa waiver.
It cost them a heck of a lot for Alan to pay everyone off so they could return 'clean' men.

There was another guy, a European who had a ten-year overstay. He was a professional horse trainer working in Kanchanaburi when his work permit and visa expired. He just stayed on, and no one from immigration chased him. The other thing, he was a chronic alcoholic.
He came to Nong Khai, was told to spend the night in the guest house and in next morning Alan would take him to court, pay the fine, go to Laos and come back.

Only thing was he didn't stay in the guest house for the night, but went and got blotto in a few bars. Next morning, he couldn't go to court.
Alan paid the local police to "arrest" him (really!) and lock him in a cell for twenty-four hours to get him sober.
Then the morning after a night in the cell, the police took him to court for the same rigmarole  the two Americans went through.

The days when overstay could just be cleared by paying off the judge and immigration.

Makes you wonder why we get the paperwork etc done every year. Sounds easier to do it every 10-20 years. Cheaper too and with a personal help to expedite thing 🤔 You have a phone number for me?

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5 minutes ago, Bluesofa said:

Another story that reminds me about the late Alan Paterson in Nong Khai who used to 'sort out' visa overstays.
Twenty-odd years ago there were two Americans, father and son. They both lived somewhere isolated at the back-end of nowhere in Thailand.
The father was a Vietnam veteran who never went home. His son came out to Thailand to join his father. The father had a twenty-year overstay, his son a mere ten years.

Alan Paterson got them both to come to Nong Khai, give themselves up to the police, then appear in court the next day. They were fined the maximum ( I think it was 10,000 Baht then).
Then the immigration had to been seen to do their job, so escorted them to the newly-opened bridge to Laos. They cleared immigration into Laos, turned round and came back to Thailand, getting a 30 day visa waiver.
It cost them a heck of a lot for Alan to pay everyone off so they could return 'clean' men.

There was another guy, a European who had a ten-year overstay. He was a professional horse trainer working in Kanchanaburi when his work permit and visa expired. He just stayed on, and no one from immigration chased him. The other thing, he was a chronic alcoholic.
He came to Nong Khai, was told to spend the night in the guest house and in next morning Alan would take him to court, pay the fine, go to Laos and come back.

Only thing was he didn't stay in the guest house for the night, but went and got blotto in a few bars. Next morning, he couldn't go to court.
Alan paid the local police to "arrest" him (really!) and lock him in a cell for twenty-four hours to get him sober.
Then the morning after a night in the cell, the police took him to court for the same rigmarole  the two Americans went through.

The days when overstay could just be cleared by paying off the judge and immigration.

Now we've got student visas and BOI companies charging digital nomads $50 a month for a work visa

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6 minutes ago, Bob20 said:

Makes you wonder why we get the paperwork etc done every year. Sounds easier to do it every 10-20 years. Cheaper too and with a personal help to expedite thing 🤔 You have a phone number for me?

I could, even though Alan has been dead for years, but I think hell is a local call from Thailand.

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1 hour ago, DiJoDavO said:

But why arrested during the 'pandemic' tho? She's not able to go back home because we all have to stay where we are, right? Couldn't they get her earlier? 

Why?

Because that's when she was caught 😂

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12 hours ago, Bluesofa said:

Another story that reminds me about the late Alan Paterson in Nong Khai who used to 'sort out' visa overstays.
Twenty-odd years ago there were two Americans, father and son. They both lived somewhere isolated at the back-end of nowhere in Thailand.
The father was a Vietnam veteran who never went home. His son came out to Thailand to join his father. The father had a twenty-year overstay, his son a mere ten years.

Alan Paterson got them both to come to Nong Khai, give themselves up to the police, then appear in court the next day. They were fined the maximum ( I think it was 10,000 Baht then).
Then the immigration had to been seen to do their job, so escorted them to the newly-opened bridge to Laos. They cleared immigration into Laos, turned round and came back to Thailand, getting a 30 day visa waiver.
It cost them a heck of a lot for Alan to pay everyone off so they could return 'clean' men.

There was another guy, a European who had a ten-year overstay. He was a professional horse trainer working in Kanchanaburi when his work permit and visa expired. He just stayed on, and no one from immigration chased him. The other thing, he was a chronic alcoholic.
He came to Nong Khai, was told to spend the night in the guest house and in next morning Alan would take him to court, pay the fine, go to Laos and come back.

Only thing was he didn't stay in the guest house for the night, but went and got blotto in a few bars. Next morning, he couldn't go to court.
Alan paid the local police to "arrest" him (really!) and lock him in a cell for twenty-four hours to get him sober.
Then the morning after a night in the cell, the police took him to court for the same rigmarole  the two Americans went through.

The days when overstay could just be cleared by paying off the judge and immigration.

Those were the days

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Curious about what happens to the Myanmar, Lao, Cambodians and Malaysians that overstay or are here illegally, do they get the same treatment or different rules again?

11 hours ago, RobMuir said:

To protect our fellow farangs. The other one did it also. 

Thais get named and shamed.

 

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I know the law is the law but sometimes its an ass as well. What's the betting her husband (who past away a month earlier) was telling her he would sort it all out each year (brown packets or not) and she was happy to potter about oblivious.

Wish they were as diligent around the Posey of pimps and yaba sellers down at Nana but I guess those guys did stump up the packets instead. 

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well as a elderly and lived quietly,she not a threat,unlike some criminals who live here and have a valid visa,but l would had thought losing your husband is very distressing,l assume she not locked up,but treated with compassion and allowed to get her personal problems sorted and if she has to be deported treat her with kindness

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 9/17/2021 at 3:41 AM, gazmo16 said:

I know the law is the law but sometimes its an ass as well. What's the betting her husband (who past away a month earlier) was telling her he would sort it all out each year (brown packets or not) and she was happy to potter about oblivious.

Wish they were as diligent around the Posey of pimps and yaba sellers down at Nana but I guess those guys did stump up the packets instead. 

Is there a standard amount in the packets?

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On 9/16/2021 at 11:53 AM, DiJoDavO said:

But why arrested during the 'pandemic' tho? She's not able to go back home because we all have to stay where we are, right? Couldn't they get her earlier? 

Why can’t she go “back home”? You can leave and go to Europe whenever you want. 

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On 9/16/2021 at 12:14 PM, Shade_Wilder said:

Woman-caught-in-Samui-on-10-year-overstay-mgronline.jpg

I am truly amazed that it only took three of them to subdue her...

Why do they have to pose like that and take such stupid pictures. Utterly childish and pathetic. Look at us, we’ve done our job. Big deal Somchai, now run along and catch some more. 

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