Jump to content

Your Own Favourite Car Photos.


Transam
 Share

Recommended Posts

There is a garage in Rawai and this guy is shit hot on restoring cars he must be well know throughout Thailand I've seen alsorts in there from old citrons old merc's and them old Hillbilly american trucks 

A couple of years back he had a MGB judging by the wheels and the bumpers it was a 70's model he did a complete restoration on it and a couple of months later I saw it back in the garage I asked the guy what happened there he said the owner smashed it up, it was up for sale 1.2 million baht I dont know if it ever got sold,

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Rowdy said:

My 3rd car was a Bug eye sprite, I got my drivers license in this.

image.jpg

I had one of those.  Same colour.  My first car after passing my driving test.  Cost 190 Quid.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/18/2021 at 9:35 AM, Transam said:

After my mini crash scare I went the opposite way and bought a 1959 Ford Zephyr 2.6 Low line, put some fat wheels on it feeling a lot safer, then my 1964 MGB Roadster, soft top, wire wheels, sadly the thing fell apart with rust, I spent hours tidying the thing up to off load it.

Anyhooo, my next car that I have a photo of is a 1976 Ford Granada Ghia, 3.0 V6 with auto trans. Fabulous car for the era, independent suspension, factory sunroof, wood trim interior, a gem of a car. It belonged to my mum, she had moved to N.Wales, but the car was too thirsty for her daily drive to work and back, so I took it on.

Back in London I went over it to find it had a few rust problems, driver's door was shot, well mums place was by the sea shore where the car would take a serious salt water thrashing. So located a good door, fix the other issues, stripped out all the wood internal fittings, refurbished them to look like new.

The car was silver, I don't like silver, so when the body work was finished I had it blown over in Black. I was very pleased with the result. This is me outside mums place in N.Wales with the refurbished car, I think it was 1982...

Scan.jpg.f1ac9d9a3b09ad4e94cce2d37261299f.jpg

Confess.  Was it you that picked out the lettering on the tyres of the Granny?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/19/2021 at 11:35 AM, Transam said:

I am sure the Brits here will know where this pic of my car was taken...

Brands.jpg.132dd583c56520102d71dfbe24e8cdd5.jpg

Druids, Brands Hatch

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If we were to have a 'Cars I almost bought but glad I didn't' thread 😀 my list would include:-

E-type Jaguar - nearly bought one ~ '75 but it rode like a boat!

Porsche 928 - a 1980's model, body in mint condition, not a thrilling ride but really got turned off when the owner 'showed off' a stack of repair invoices, inch and half thick!

Lexus LS400 - 1992 model, Aus 2nd hand import - like riding an armchair with ear muffs on - too quiet, too luxurious!  Fabulous vehicle & showpiece of Toyota engineering.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Changnam43 said:

Confess.  Was it you that picked out the lettering on the tyres of the Granny?

No, I bought them like that, American tyres, in fact they were not radials, F & G size..😊

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first car was a 1967 Ford Anglia. Bought it as needed " go to work " transport as an apprentice engineer.

When the rings suddenly collapsed replaced the engine with a second hand 1600 Kent as it was a quick weekend option with minor adaptations. Definitely a performance change

But my additional (shared) fun car was a 1936 Austin 7 Ruby. My girlfriend  bought it and I got to drive it around with her after replacing a rear axle ( 1 out of 3 stored under the  back seat ).

It was fun but came with the annoyance of often being pulled over by the Pleece who more often than not after saying they wanted to check it was legal then waxed on about how their parents had one when they were young ! I was quite sad when my girlfriend and I parted because she sold it.

It was in the same colours as in this  stock pic.

 

austin-seven-ruby-1936-2D7NE24.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember being offered an E type V12 for a thousand quid at a tyre shop in Oxford in the late 70s.  FHC in yellow.

I had been working on building sites during the student recess so I could have come up with the money to buy it but there was no way I could have insured it or afforded to run it as I couldn't have been more than 20 years old at the time.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Changnam43 said:

I remember being offered an E type V12 for a thousand quid at a tyre shop in Oxford in the late 70s.  FHC in yellow.

I had been working on building sites during the student recess so I could have come up with the money to buy it but there was no way I could have insured it or afforded to run it as I couldn't have been more than 20 years old at the time.

Would be worth a few quid today.

Way back when I bought a 1959 Zephyr six, mum insured it so l could drive it..😋 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Transam said:

Would be worth a few quid today.

Way back when I bought a 1959 Zephyr six, mum insured it so l could drive it..😋 

That was the  way to go. My first car I owned was an Austin Mini, 1962 'cos as an apprentice on £3 - 14 s per week that is all I could afford. My dad had a good business in those days so when he bought a Mercedes he gave me his year old Humber Super Snipe. I could neither afford the insurance nor the fuel so I used it on high days and holidays only but he still had to insure for me. First car I had  where 100 mph was nice to do.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The owner of the construction company I worked for had a weakness for Mark 2 Jags.

Back in the late 70s he would buy them for a couple of hundred quid and run them till they dropped; usually from rust.  They tended to be a bit beaten up but the underpinnings were still good.  They weren't pampered classics in those days and I can remember stacking bags of cement on the leather back seat.

Sometimes I would get sent in the Jag to the construction supply yard.  It's a good job he never saw how I drove it.

The boss was also fond of Zodiacs and Zephyrs.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the Mark 2 Jag it wasn't the power that impressed me.  Though it had plenty for the day.

It was the ride and handling that impressed most; that and all those instruments on the dash.

I was an easily impressionable kid at the time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I should write a paperback on this story of mine...🤭

 

Picasa_2.jpg.939323a29b74079674a00662116a8080.jpg

 

Now just things to order for the assembly, all fasteners were to be chrome-moly or stainless steel, chrome-moly push rods, stainless valves, roller bearing roller tip rocker arms, valve springs to cope with my build rev range, 4500-6500+rpm etc..Freeze plugs were replaced, pressed in oil gallery plug were removed, I then tapped tapered pipe threads to use NPT plugs, they will never blow out under high oil pressure. 

Factory heads had an exhaust crossover to heat the bottom of the intake manifold, my replacement manifold didn't have that feature, so I found a few old alternator casings, melted them down with oxyacetylene, then poured the molten alloy into each crossover space, then spent hours shaping the ports to all match. Bronze guides were installed and reamed for the new valves.

My new manifold was designed by Doug Nash for Pontiac racing, I found one speed shop in the USA who had the rights to manufacture it, I imported one, then got it polished, my car was to be a show & go street car..

It was advised to use a 2" spacer on this manifold for the 6.6 engine, so I made one, which was also perfect for installing my homemade nitrous oxide system at a later stage..  

To be continued....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Continued....

Photo-077.jpg.3dfe5ce104261f4a70903b8ba2176d95.jpg

Engine assembly went well, did some last minute port matching, but all in all OK. 

Bought an aftermarket deep sump and windage tray, held more oil and kept oil away from the crank on acceleration/launch..  High volume oil pump too. A new True roller timing chain and gear set were also fitted.

The carb I used was already on the old engine, which was too big for the original engine, but perfect for my project, I rebuilt it, bought a pair of chrome fuel bowls, painted the carb body, all was good.

The fabulous HEI factory distributor was used, but I worked the internals to use a Jacobs Electronics ignition system, it was the nuts.

Two electric fuel pumps, one for the carb and one for the N2O, pressure regulators were installed under the hood for easy adjustment, as well as a pressure gauge. All fuel lines were braided stainless steel with alloy joints/connectors.

The "oil filter", in this photo below, is in fact an easy to get at transmission fluid filter, the lines went on to an oil cooler attached to the radiator..The chrome thing in between it and the coil is the nitrous oxide energize valve, it has to handle 1000psi...

 

Photo-098.jpg.8af9cc0c39c9932a28fa4572c314423b.jpg

 

To be contiued....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

^ Great story to follow Trans as many of my (Aus/NZ) Nissan Z32 club owner friends were into major rebuilds.  Some even transplanting LS1 donks into their 300zx's with all the bling bits that goes with it.

I'll post a few pics soon.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, KaptainRob said:

^ Great story to follow Trans as many of my (Aus/NZ) Nissan Z32 club owner friends were into major rebuilds.  Some even transplanting LS1 donks into their 300zx's with all the bling bits that goes with it.

I'll post a few pics soon.

Well I'm glad someone is reading it....😃

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The most enjoyable car I owned, a Nissan 300zxTT (Z32) was also the fastest, with excellent handling, and comfortable on long distances.  Recaro seats ensured a 1,000 km trip was not at all tiring. 

A one owner 1990 model imported from Japan with ~70,000 genuine kms, my Zed had been garaged and regularly serviced in Japan.  I bought it fresh off the ship in 2002 and kept her until 2010 when I moved to Thailand.

Z1.thumb.JPG.326706ad708b720f129b991b6f548d7a.JPG

I added aftermarket mag wheels but retained the OEM tyre size & profile.  Apart from a remapped ECU to improve power output without excessive fuel consumption, I did very little else.  The 3.0L with twin turbo's was a superb engine and coupled to an auto transmission it was incredibly quick off the mark.  Took a while to learn how to control her when cornering fast as unexpected kick-down could easily send us sideways.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

More.....

Photo-0041.jpg.3cb73dc7812ff72df3817fc5ab275235.jpg

 

 

As a side note, that rusting VW camper on the right was tweaked by me, the 2.0ltr was scrapped, a Chevy 5.7 V8 with a TH350 auto was installed, good fun at the stop light drags.

The Pontiac, as you can see, the front was lowered, I replaced the front springs with a pair of springs from a 6 pot Camaro, worked out fine.

Back to the engine. The stock Pontiac exhaust manifold fixings were a bit of a joke if you wanted to install after market manifolds, so I found the fix, manifolds that came with a 1/4" thick adaptor plate, the plate bolted to the original head boltholes using countersunk set screws, then the manifold bolted to the plates, great. Before installing, I had them sand blasted and then alloy metal sprayed, they came back a white colour, and to my surprise, anything spilt on them just burned off under use leaving them unmarked white..You can just see a manifold in the picture below, very tight indeed, they were 4 x 2" primaries tubes going into 3.5" collectors.

At the strip I used to unbolt the exhaust system from the collectors to run on the strip, sounded great, but was a real pain getting it off and on again, so I eventually fabricated a twin 3.5" system from collectors to tail pipes, under the now removed fuel tank were twin 3.5 race mufflers, so I am eliminating the  removal hassle, that sounded great too...Photo-0034.jpg.75e91d8721f46e8d81a83ad9bb620ad2.jpg

 

To be continued.....

 

 

Photo-0034.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had some lag pipes made up for the Mach1.  The joined the main exhaust with a Y-piece, one pipe coming out just in front of the rear wheels each side with a removable flange on the ends.  Left the flanges off for the trip home at times ... nothing like a V8 exhaust note.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, KaptainRob said:

I had some lag pipes made up for the Mach1.  The joined the main exhaust with a Y-piece, one pipe coming out just in front of the rear wheels each side with a removable flange on the ends.  Left the flanges off for the trip home at times ... nothing like a V8 exhaust note.

My chum had those, I thought about it, but as I mainly drove on the street I decided on the race box system, I can tell you, foot to the floor made an amazing sound that could be heard for miles.....😚

The twin 3.5 system was over axle too, took me a while to source the bends etc for welding, they came from a place that made them for heavy goods vehicles. Took me a long time to make a nice job with no body fowling. The end result was......

 

Picasa_20.jpg.3de0cf343dfb8ef30bc85ecafbebf218.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's next........🤭

Engine oil filter and cooling...

Where the oil filter screws onto a housing bolted to the block was a no-no, very little room and a pain to get too. So braided stainless hoses from the block leading to an Oberg filter was installed, from there hoses went to the cooler fitted to the radiator. The photo below shows the Oberg, bottom right, plus a diagram of it. It is a screen filter, I chose it because in 2 minutes I could look inside it to see if there is any naughty stuff going on. The only downside was it was a regular check and clean, but 10 minutes, and it was done.. 

 

Picasa_17.jpg.ed610d339527c1ae68ffd56714c24fe8.jpg

 

Oberg.jpg.eba974d0f993a9a0af8bf7da02145985.jpg

I used -12 hoses for the engine oil lines, think I should have used -10, I had a bit of an oil pressure problem at idle when hot, so I removed the sump and fooled around with the pressure relief valve, the fix worked, but starting from cold the oil pressure went up to 140psi at 2000rpm, thankfully the engine only took a couple of minutes to get hot, bringing oil pressure down to just where I wanted it, plus in the high rev range 100psi was perfect....😊.....I used a Castrol 10w-60 synthetic oil, it was happy with that.

To be continued.......

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ancillary V-belt throwing was always a problem, that is, when foot to the floor from a standstill, as the engine immediately flashed up to 3600rpm...

My fix was to machine new pulleys from blocks of aluminium. My chum had a couple of lathes in his workshop, he restores vintage motorcycles for a living, I used to help out with a few things, mainly welding, so I had free use of his machinery.

My idea was to use the modern poly-V belts, which meant making a double pulley for the crank and water pump and single two piece one for the power steering  and a solid one for the alternator, which was a bigger diameter than stock to slow it down. The stock alternator was binned and a higher amp Toyota one fitted, that was stripped, reconditioned and the case polished by me before reassembly..

Took me quite a while to work out dimensions for size and fitting, and machining the "V" grooves took many hours, but got there in the end.

Took them to Biggin Hill airport, there is an aeroplane piston  engine workshop there, they balanced the pulleys.

The stock power steering pump  and alternator were located in hard to get at places, so in my plans they were to be placed for easy access. I had to make brackets to do the job, then get them chromed, worked out well, though a lot of time was spent shimming. The stock power steering pump had a pressed on pulley, so I sourced one from an older ride that used the same pump but had a keyway and nut to hold the pulley on, again, that was reconditioned and chromed....Photos tell all....

 

274343197_000219.jpg.882bc0dd0c7a919147d1ee690c850129.jpg

 

Picasa_2.jpg.e0dc1bddbf0301f15f77e19d76b55b75.jpg

To be continued.....

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And now to the one thing l was really in the dark with, getting a performance auto to suit my engine... .......

Very few options back then, though the Pontiac was a GM car, the bell housing was different to a GM Chevy, because the engine bolt positions were different, so I had to source a TH350 or a TH400 with Pontiac bolt pattern. 

TH350's went on midsized cars and lightweight performance stuff. It had a lower ratio first gear, so was good at getting a car moving, but it was not nearly as strong as the TH400.

The GM TH400 was also fitted to Rolls Royce and some Jaguars back then too.

TH400.jpg.412cbb9d37f604ccb8625cc7e3858994.jpg

This box is a TH400 with a deep sump, and what looks like a stock 12" torque converter, the converter I was to use would be 10" diameter, the higher the stall speed (rpm) required, the smaller the diameter, same as the one below....

2065649470_BM.png.21a969361e063ad1ca6bc4fe75911496.png

To be continued........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trans stuff continued.....

I did find a performance TH400, but it was problematic, plus the 4,500 rpm stall speed converter was useless on the street, that failed on the strip in short order...🥴

I should explain what converter stall speed is before I carry on.

If you build a performance engine it will have a power band, mine was 4,500-6,500+ rpm, so if I was racing  I wanted to use that band, with a manual box that was easy, but with an auto you can only do that by using a high stall converter, so as soon as you put the pedal to the metal the converter would flash up to its manufactured stall speed. The 4,500 rpm one I bought was useless on the street because I was always using high revs to get anywhere, especially moving the very heavy car on an incline. I had to compromise...

After doing a lot of reading, I settled on a B&M 3,600 stall Super Holeshot. It was great, on the street it moved the car like a stock converter, but when you floored it, it flashed to 3,600+ rpm effortlessly, the only drawback was it was 1000rpm short of my power band, but I had a plan.

I imported a a race TH400 box from the USA, the box was meant purely for the strip, but I wanted some fun. It had no auto features, no engine braking and was reverse pattern manual shift, which means shifting gears was P- R-N-1-2-3, not P-R-N-D-2-1.

The gear lever (shifter) was a very small ratchet type, it stayed in the upright position all the time, I just nudged it one way or the other, brilliant, a bit like modern-day rally car shifting, it was a B&M Quick-Click, same as below except I built it into my cars prop tunnel cover..

 BM-Quick-Click-Shifter-Vintage-Rare-3-Speed.jpg.66ddeaea005bb1f355b5c13e9e0ad468.jpg

To be continued....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By posting on Thaiger Talk you agree to the Terms of Use