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8 hours ago, Stonker said:

Jesus H Christ.

They were given the choice by the local police because the police were i) corrupt and ii) in a position to be able to cover it up as there had been no publicity and they could 'lose' the paperwork and report an entirely different story - as happened initially with Joe Ferrari and in the 'Boss' case.

To return to your original point:

Absolute bollox.

It can't be covered up as it's already in the media so that's not an option.

Already acknowledged coruption is a factor, don't know why you rabbit on. As you know police make the decision to forward charges to a prosector to decide whether to proceed to Court. Corruption is endemic with compensation a factor on proceedings i.e. police do not forward for prosection, in fact I go as far to say to a degree it's a cultural norm.

I think it's timely to remind you why this conversation started, You posted in reply...

"The decision to prosecute has absolutely nothing to do with the family and they have no say in it at all - it's entirely up to the police and the DPP.

While 'blood money' applies in some countries it doesn't here, and all paying compensation would affect would be damages."

Claiming the family has no involvement with police decision making is nonsense as they agree, or not, to engage with police for monies paid by an offender for compensation to cease proesection going forward.

No further reply from me.

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11 hours ago, Stonker said:

ONLY where police corruption can hide the evidence and the guilt.

That obviously isn't the case here, just as it isn't the case with 'Joe Ferrari' and 'Boss' Red Bull.

Thank you, though, for having the grace to say that you were mistaken.

It's a part of Sharia law, at least in some countries - it's not part of any legal system here, just a by-product of police corruption.

It's an interesting  cultural topic 

 

Say if my stepson was, God/Buddha forbid,  was killed by a negligent/drunk driver I would want them prosecuted 

 

Whereas my wife, who has been privy to the corruption, may want to accept money because she thinks that's the only just outcome we would get 

 

It would be a conflict of cultures 

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5 hours ago, PBS said:

Already acknowledged coruption is a factor, don't know why you rabbit on.

Because you were and are talking rubbish, as clearly evidenced by the 'Boss' Red Bull and 'Joe Ferrari' cases.

Any decision not to prosecute has nothing to do with paying compensation to the victims' families, regardless of whether they accept it or not.

It's purely down to whether the police and the public prosecutor want to prosecute or not, and that may often depend on whether the police or public prosecutor have been paid off or not.

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2 hours ago, Marc26 said:

It's an interesting  cultural topic 

Say if my stepson was, God/Buddha forbid,  was killed by a negligent/drunk driver I would want them prosecuted 

Whereas my wife, who has been privy to the corruption, may want to accept money because she thinks that's the only just outcome we would get 

It would be a conflict of cultures 

Culturally interesting, yes, but it would be neither your nor your wife's choice.

Unless the police or public prosecutor have been paid off, whether you or your wife have been paid off and are happy with the 'compensation' is irrelevant.

The 'Boss' Red Bull and 'Joe Ferrari' cases make that very clear, particularly 'Joe Ferrari' where the dead man's wife was paid off and accepted it but the prosecution is still going ahead.

 

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2 hours ago, Marc26 said:

It's an interesting  cultural topic 

Say if my stepson was, God/Buddha forbid,  was killed by a negligent/drunk driver I would want them prosecuted 

Whereas my wife, who has been privy to the corruption, may want to accept money because she thinks that's the only just outcome we would get 

 It would be a conflict of cultures

It would be a conflict of cultures..? 

The Epstein case must be in corrupt old Thailand because those  victims got compensation....

Greedy corrupt Thai practices must have been the inspiration for it...

https://nypost.com/2021/08/09/epstein-compensation-fund-pays-out-nearly-125m-to-victims/

Darn Thailand's corruption just doesn't seem to stay out. It's spreading...

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20 minutes ago, Stonker said:

Culturally interesting, yes, but it would be neither your nor your wife's choice.

Unless the police or public prosecutor have been paid off, whether you or your wife have been paid off and are happy with the 'compensation' is irrelevant.

The 'Boss' Red Bull and 'Joe Ferrari' cases make that very clear, particularly 'Joe Ferrari' where the dead man's wife was paid off and accepted it but the prosecution is still going ahead.

This is where we will disagree 

 

You seem to be only looking at this to the letter of the law, in a country that hardly goes by the letter of the law

 

And keep using one of the most high profile cases to prove your point

 

When the vast majority of cases will never have any media attention, so the police and prosecutors have no pressure to pursue charges

It is in the police's financial interest to broker a compensation deal rather than pursue charges 

 

In a lot of cases, they are corrupt and are pushing the victims family to take compensation 

And in most of those cases, the families feel intimated and pressured to accept compensation and not make any waves

 

So of course it is the victim's family choice to not accept compensation and make waves to push for prosecution

Now many don't feel they have any other choice but to accept compensation 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Vince said:

It would be a conflict of cultures..? 

The Epstein case must be in corrupt old Thailand because those  victims got compensation....

Greedy corrupt Thai practices must have been the inspiration for it...

https://nypost.com/2021/08/09/epstein-compensation-fund-pays-out-nearly-125m-to-victims/

Darn Thailand's corruption just doesn't seem to stay out. It's spreading...

You literally been saying the same shit over and over 

Get a new slant, it's boring ......

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3 minutes ago, Marc26 said:

You literally been saying the same shit over and over 

Get a new slant, it's boring ......

Pot. Kettle. Black. 

tenor.gif.3563d3aaea35f21e87968d7623449e69.gif

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3 minutes ago, Vince said:

Pot. Kettle. Black. 

tenor.gif.3563d3aaea35f21e87968d7623449e69.gif

I will go check with my Thesaurus so I can come up with new ways to say you are annoying as fcuk

 

Be back......

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25 minutes ago, Marc26 said:

This is where we will disagree 

You seem to be only looking at this to the letter of the law, in a country that hardly goes by the letter of the law

And keep using one of the most high profile cases to prove your point

When the vast majority of cases will never have any media attention, so the police and prosecutors have no pressure to pursue charges

It is in the police's financial interest to broker a compensation deal rather than pursue charges 

In a lot of cases, they are corrupt and are pushing the victims family to take compensation 

And in most of those cases, the families feel intimated and pressured to accept compensation and not make any waves

So of course it is the victim's family choice to not accept compensation and make waves to push for prosecution

Now many don't feel they have any other choice but to accept compensation 

No, I'm not looking at "the letter of the law" but the reality of what happens in practice -  Boss and Joe Ferrari were simply known examples rather than something someone said on a forum or over a beer in Pattaya.

It's not down to the victim's family to decide if a prosecution gets dropped or not - it's strictly down to the police and the public prosecutor and that may well depend on whether they're paid off or not.

It's pretty simple and pretty clear.

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29 minutes ago, Stonker said:

No, I'm not looking at "the letter of the law" but the reality of what happens in practice -  Boss and Joe Ferrari were simply known examples rather than something someone said on a forum or over a beer in Pattaya.

It's not down to the victim's family to decide if a prosecution gets dropped or not - it's strictly down to the police and the public prosecutor and that may well depend on whether they're paid off or not.

It's pretty simple and pretty clear.

Simply "known" examples

Which applies pressure on them to purse charges

 

On everyday incidents they don't have that pressure

So they can use their intimidation to force compensation payment so that the families or victims don't make waves

 

I've been personally involved in an incident 

I had police give the suspect's family my address 

I have had police harass and intimidate my gf to the point she had to flee the area

 

And yes, the police were pushing for a settlement instead of anyone making waves 

 

And yes, the family of the deceased refused any compensation deal and the case went to trial, despite the police's attempt to forcing the family and victim to not make waves 

 

It is the complete opposite of simple and clear when you want justice for your family and the police are trying to impede that justice.....

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6 hours ago, Marc26 said:

It is the complete opposite of simple and clear when you want justice for your family and the police are trying to impede that justice.....

The issue experienced by your gf is corruption. This debate seems to have come about because of an incorrect assumption that money paid to a victims family automatically means the end of the matter both from a civil and criminal perspective and that the victim’s family has the right to stop criminal action. They do not. They have the right to pursue damages or not in a civil matter however, regardless of their choices, it is not the end of the criminal matter UNLESS the police are corrupt and accept payment from the offender. People do not decide who gets charged or not. Cops do that. In some cases where a criminal charge does not eventuate it is most likely because  2 payments are made by the offender, one to the family and one to the cops. 

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16 hours ago, Marc26 said:

Simply "known" examples

Which applies pressure on them to purse charges

On everyday incidents they don't have that pressure

So they can use their intimidation to force compensation payment so that the families or victims don't make waves

I've been personally involved in an incident 

I had police give the suspect's family my address 

I have had police harass and intimidate my gf to the point she had to flee the area

And yes, the police were pushing for a settlement instead of anyone making waves 

And yes, the family of the deceased refused any compensation deal and the case went to trial, despite the police's attempt to forcing the family and victim to not make waves 

It is the complete opposite of simple and clear when you want justice for your family and the police are trying to impede that justice.....

God almighty - the police weren't "pushing for a settlement" like Solomon, to see justice observed - they were pushing for a bribe!

How can you not see that 😂?

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10 hours ago, Fanta said:

The issue experienced by your gf is corruption. This debate seems to have come about because of an incorrect assumption that money paid to a victims family automatically means the end of the matter both from a civil and criminal perspective and that the victim’s family has the right to stop criminal action. They do not. They have the right to pursue damages or not in a civil matter however, regardless of their choices, it is not the end of the criminal matter UNLESS the police are corrupt and accept payment from the offender. People do not decide who gets charged or not. Cops do that. In some cases where a criminal charge does not eventuate it is most likely because  2 payments are made by the offender, one to the family and one to the cops. 

Exactly - with the one to the cops being rather more, and rather more important!

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2 hours ago, Stonker said:

God almighty - the police weren't "pushing for a settlement" like Solomon, to see justice observed - they were pushing for a bribe!

How can you not see that 😂?

God Almighty 

 

God forbid someone have a different view than you 

And has actually experienced it in real life with it, not over a beer 

 

I like your posts a lot

But man, can you be an insufferable ass to have any sort of debate with 

 

You can be such a boring know-it-all

 

 

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2 hours ago, Stonker said:

God almighty - the police weren't "pushing for a settlement" like Solomon, to see justice observed - they were pushing for a bribe!

How can you not see that 😂?

Have you read anything I wrote you insufferable twat?

 

Probably not because I'm disagreeing with  you

So once that happens you just don't bother to read anything someone write 

Just  want to "prove your right"

 

I know you think you know it all

 

But I've been saying for 2 pages they want a bribe, you idiot

 

Read what I fxuking wrote!!!!

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13 hours ago, Fanta said:

The issue experienced by your gf is corruption. This debate seems to have come about because of an incorrect assumption that money paid to a victims family automatically means the end of the matter both from a civil and criminal perspective and that the victim’s family has the right to stop criminal action. They do not. They have the right to pursue damages or not in a civil matter however, regardless of their choices, it is not the end of the criminal matter UNLESS the police are corrupt and accept payment from the offender. People do not decide who gets charged or not. Cops do that. In some cases where a criminal charge does not eventuate it is most likely because  2 payments are made by the offender, one to the family and one to the cops. 

I feel like I'm taking crazy pills

 

This is what I've been saying in every single one of my posts about the subject

 

It's literally the only thing I've been saying

 

If I weren't clear enough, I guess that's on me but I thought I was pretty clear in what i was saying 

 

What did you think I meant when I say:

"It is in the cops financial interest to broker a settlement "

 

 

Or "the police are trying to impose that justice"

 

I'm honestly confused

 

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1 hour ago, Marc26 said:

I feel like I'm taking crazy pills

This is what I've been saying in every single one of my posts about the subject

It's literally the only thing I've been saying

If I weren't clear enough, I guess that's on me but I thought I was pretty clear in what i was saying

Maybe you need a few less crazy pills and its you that needs to "read what you fxuking wrote😢!

... and are still writing:

1 hour ago, Marc26 said:

Or "the police are trying to impose that justice"

I'm honestly confused

But the police aren't "trying to impose justice" 😂!

How can "justice" be letting 'Boss' Red Bull go, or Joe Ferrari extorting money from an alleged drug dealer then paying the guy's wife to say nothing after he'd killed him, or, closer to home, intimidating you and your gf / wife?

That isn't "trying to impose justice", which isn't their job anyway - it's just trying to get the most money they can for themselves from anyone involved, whether they're victim or perpetrator.

You've say you've been on the receiving end, so how can you not see that and still say that they're "trying to impose justice"??? 

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On 1/28/2022 at 1:26 AM, Stonker said:

but the prosecution is still going ahead.

laughable..........yeah  with 110% effort by the  Police and prosecutors   I see

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3 hours ago, RampantRabbit said:

laughable..........yeah  with 110% effort by the  Police and prosecutors   I see

Why "laughable"?

Joe Ferrari's in jail until his trial, and if you think that a trial or a guilty verdict are unlikely then I'd be interested to know why or what you "see".

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49 minutes ago, Stonker said:

Why "laughable"?

Joe Ferrari's in jail until his trial, and if you think that a trial or a guilty verdict are unlikely then I'd be interested to know why or what you "see".

was referring to red  bullshit  guy

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1 hour ago, RampantRabbit said:

was referring to red  bullshit  guy

Ah - I wasn't.  If he's not in the country, though, I'm still not sure what you'd like the police or prosecutors to do.

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6 hours ago, Stonker said:

Ah - I wasn't.  If he's not in the country, though, I'm still not sure what you'd like the police or prosecutors to do.

Show some interest and real effort in actually finding him 

post a million dollar bounty on his privileged butt ; that would work fast

find a legal way around the stupid amnesty on death crime laws which are clearly designed only for the rich to hide outside Thailand until safe to return.

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3 hours ago, oldschooler said:

Show some interest and real effort in actually finding him 

post a million dollar bounty on his privileged butt ; that would work fast

find a legal way around the stupid amnesty on death crime laws which are clearly designed only for the rich to hide outside Thailand until safe to return.

Agreed, but it's actually a statute of limitations, not an amnesty.

... and it's just a thought, but if they had a way round the statute of limitations it wouldn't make much sense to make it public ... 😯

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