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stuhan

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  1. Starsan is great stuff as you say.lasts a long time, it's just i don't brew enough to justify the expense, so i just by the cheaper cleaner that does me for what i make ( or maybe it's my Scottish blood). No visible activity could just be the yeast type, some go mad others are pretty docile, but activity through your airlock appx 50-60 B.P.M is a good sign it's working well, when it's bubbling about 1-2 a minute then it's nearly finishing, but remember your hydrometer is god, it tells you when things are done for sure not the air lock, take a sample reading every 4 days that will show you where you are. When the hydrometer reads the same 2 or 3 days apart then it's done, but you probably know all this already. I can't wait to start a few new wines in november, will be ordering some new equipment soon.
  2. Now i've finished on the vaccine forum (just a mid morning snack) . Time to get back to wine making. Everyone has there own methods when doing fermentations, this is mine. 1st i do all my fermenting now in 1X 12L bottle from start to finish before i rack/ transfer it into my 8L storage bottle.Reasons i do this: 1: I find racking/transfering at 1.010 to 1.030 can interfere with the fermentation even stopping or stuck fermentations at times. 2: Most of my wines are now from carton juices so they don't create a lot of lees/sediment so leaving the wine on the lees which is mostly dead yeast cells won't really affect the finished wine that much if any. So my wines now finish fermenting completely then i rack/tranfer them to clear. 1st photo is my 8L storage bottle : 2nd is the cleaner i use which is a much cheaper alternative to starsan,pbw,stellersan,ect ect. 3rd is my 12L fermenting bottle completely clear,i make 8.5L of must then when finished that will give me my full 8L of wine (due to wastage during racking). I do use an air lock after 3 days during fermentation,i don't worry about the head space.
  3. I don't know what went wrong there stretch it was zool who said about pfizer FDA approval not me.
  4. That's your opinion and your life, so up to you, even professionals have joined the ranks of conspiracy theories, enjoy your day.
  5. We talk about long term effects as if the only outcome will be negative, what if the long term effects prove positive, nobody knows yet and until we do know all the conspiracy theories mean nothing. I will enjoy my booster shots the same as my past flu shots if it keeps me out of harms way. If the long term effects are negative then i have no regrets about my decision to have the shots, i am responsible for my own life and i prefer not to listen to conspiracy theories.
  6. Ok thanks found it now, knew they had them.
  7. Hi marble-eye, Can you tell me where you found the 10L Buckets, i have looked on LAZ and cannot find them, i found 8L & 13L but i cannot see 10L, i know they have them. cheers
  8. Pomegranate Wine This recipe makes a 1 gallon batch, If a larger batch is desired, all ingredients will scale proportionately. ***Note that 1 pack of yeast would be enough for 6 gallons. Ingredients 6 Pomegranates 96 oz. water appx 3L 2.75 lbs. sugar 8 oz. White Grape Concentrate: use 1L of grape/apple juice from tesco/big c/ect 2 tsp. Acid Blend 1 tsp. Pectic Enzyme 1 tsp. Yeast Nutrient 1/4 tsp. Tannin 1x tea bag boiled in 250ml water 1 pack Lalvin EC-1118 wine yeast Equipment Primary fermenter, stirring spoon, hydrometer, straining bag, siphon tubing kit, 1 gallon carboy or jug, an airlock and bung. A thermometer and brewing belt may be used to monitor and control temperature. Helpful hint: make sure all equipment (i.e. stirring spoon, etc.) is sterilized. Contaminated equipment can ruin the quality of the juice and the ending product. Stage 1: Preparation Wash pomegranates. Peel and remove all yellow skin. Split open and scrape out seeds. Cut into smaller pieces. Using the nylon straining bag mash and strain juice into primary fermenter. Add water and all remaining ingredients, except yeast. Stir well. Cover primary fermenter. Wait 24 hours, then add prepared yeast. Yeast Hydration and primary fermentation: in a large cup add 4 ounces of warm chlorine free water. This water is to not exceed 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir contents of yeast packet into warm water and be sure to break up any clumps. Let mixture stand in cup for 15 minutes. Bubbling or increase in mixture size is a good sign of rehydration. Add an equal part of juice to the hydrated yeast mixture and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour yeast mixture into bucket and stir gently. Next, measure and record the Specific Gravity and temperature to establish a fermentation starting point. Recording your S.G. and temperature in a log will be helpful especially if you would like to duplicate your results next season. ***Place primary fermenter with lid lightly on (can use a cheese cloth or clean hair net over bucket) and in a location, that is 65-75 Degrees Fahrenheit. Consistent stirring: Stir gently twice daily for 5 minutes. Stir once in the morning and once in the evening. Continue to monitor the yeast activity (bubbling, foaming, etc.) that is most active in this stage. Readings of S.G. decrease as sugar converts to alcohol. Stage 2: Secondary Fermentation Once the vigorous fermentation has subsided, rack to the secondary fermentation vessel, a one gallon carboy or jug, gently press the fruit to extract remaining wine, and fit the airlock with bung in the opening. Although yeast activity will decrease as the fermentation process proceeds, the process will continue on in this phase. S.G. Monitoring: Check S.G.: if 0.990-0.996 the wine will be dry, if 1.000 it will be medium- sweet, if greater than 1.000 it will be a sweet wine. Allow fermentation to continue longer if needed for desired dryness. You should taste the wine to find the dryness or sweetness level that is desired. When the wine is ready, proceed to stabilization. Remember temperature controls the rate of fermentation, cool temperature will extend days required for fermenting your wine or stop the process prematurely leading to problem wine.
  9. Pear Wine This recipe makes a 1 gallon batch, If a larger batch is desired, all ingredients will scale proportionately. ***Note that 1 pack of yeast would be enough for 6 gallons. Ingredients 4 lbs. Ripe pears 96 oz. water about 3L 2 lbs. sugar 2.5 tsp. Acid Blend or 1/2 juice of a lemon 0.5 tsp. Pectic Enzyme 1 tsp. Yeast Nutrient 1 pack Lalvin ICV-D47 or EC-1118 wine yeast Equipment Primary fermenter, stirring spoon, hydrometer, straining bag, siphon tubing kit, 1 gallon carboy or jug, an airlock and bung. A thermometer and brewing belt may be used to monitor and control temperature. Helpful hint: make sure all equipment (i.e. stirring spoon, etc.) is sterilized. Contaminated equipment can ruin the quality of the juice and the ending product. Stage 1: Preparation Wash pears, drain and remove stems, and cut in half and core. Cut into smaller pieces. Using the nylon straining bag mash and strain juice into primary fermenter. As juice is extracted, immediately add Campden tablet to prevent spoilage and browning. Keeping all pulp in bag, tie top and place in primary. Add water and all remaining ingredients, except yeast. Stir well. Cover primary fermenter and wait 24 hours, then add prepared yeast. Yeast Hydration and primary fermentation: in a large cup add 4 ounces of warm chlorine free water. This water is to not exceed 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir contents of yeast packet into warm water and be sure to break up any clumps. Let mixture stand in cup for 15 minutes. Bubbling or increase in mixture size is a good sign of rehydration. Add an equal part of juice to the hydrated yeast mixture and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour yeast mixture into bucket and stir gently. Next, measure and record the Specific Gravity and temperature to establish a fermentation starting point. Recording your S.G. and temperature in a log will be helpful especially if you would like to duplicate your results next season. ***Place primary fermenter with lid lightly on (can use a cheese cloth or clean hair net over bucket) and in a location, that is 65-75 Degrees Fahrenheit. Consistent stirring: Stir gently twice daily for 5 minutes. Stir once in the morning and once in the evening. Continue to monitor the yeast activity (bubbling, foaming, etc.) that is most active in this stage. Readings of S.G. decrease as sugar converts to alcohol. Stage 2: Secondary Fermentation Once the vigorous fermentation has subsided, rack to the secondary fermentation vessel, a one gallon carboy or jug, gently press the fruit to extract remaining wine, and fit the airlock with bung in the opening. Although yeast activity will decrease as the fermentation process proceeds, the process will continue on in this phase. S.G. Monitoring: Check S.G.: if 0.990-0.996 the wine will be dry, if 1.000 it will be medium- sweet, if greater than 1.000 it will be a sweet wine. Allow fermentation to continue longer if needed for desired dryness. You should taste the wine to find the dryness or sweetness level that is desired. When the wine is ready, proceed to stabilization. Remember temperature controls the rate of fermentation, cool temperature will extend days required for fermenting your wine or stop the process prematurely leading to problem wine.
  10. Peach Wine This recipe makes a 1 gallon batch, If a larger batch is desired, all ingredients will scale proportionately. ***Note that 1 pack of yeast would be enough for 6 gallons. Ingredients 2.5 lbs. Peaches 112 oz. water 2 lbs. sugar 1.5 tsp. Acid Blend or juice half a lemon 1 tsp. Pectic Enzyme 1 tsp. Yeast Nutrient 0.25 tsp. Tannin or 1x tea bag boiled in 250ml water 1 pack Lalvin ICV-D47 or EC-1118 wine yeast Note: Use only peaches that are firm, ripe and not bruised or rotten. Stage 1: Preparation Wash peaches, remove stones and any brown patches, and weigh out correct amount. Mash and strain out juice in primary fermenter. Keep all pulp in nylon straining bag, tie top and place in primary. Stir in all other ingredients except yeast. Cover primary fermenter. After 24 hours, add prepared yeast. Yeast Hydration and primary fermentation: in a large cup add 4 ounces of warm chlorine free water. This water is to not exceed 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir contents of yeast packet into warm water and be sure to break up any clumps. Let mixture stand in cup for 15 minutes. Bubbling or increase in mixture size is a good sign of rehydration. Add an equal part of juice to the hydrated yeast mixture and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour yeast mixture into bucket and stir gently. Next, measure and record the Specific Gravity and temperature to establish a fermentation starting point. Recording your S.G. and temperature in a log will be helpful especially if you would like to duplicate your results next season. ***Place primary fermenter with lid lightly on (can use a cheese cloth or clean hair net over bucket) and in a location, that is 65-75 Degrees Fahrenheit. Consistent stirring: Stir gently twice daily for 5 minutes. Stir once in the morning and once in the evening. Continue to monitor the yeast activity (bubbling, foaming, etc.) that is most active in this stage. Readings of S.G. decrease as sugar converts to alcohol. Stage 2: Secondary Fermentation Once the vigorous fermentation has subsided, rack to the secondary fermentation vessel, a one gallon carboy or jug, gently press the fruit to extract remaining wine, and fit the airlock with bung in the opening. Although yeast activity will decrease as the fermentation process proceeds, the process will continue on in this phase. S.G. Monitoring: Check S.G.: if 0.990-0.996 the wine will be dry, if 1.000 it will be medium- sweet, if greater than 1.000 it will be a sweet wine. Allow fermentation to continue longer if needed for desired dryness. You should taste the wine to find the dryness or sweetness level that is desired. When the wine is ready, proceed to stabilization. Remember temperature controls the rate of fermentation, cool temperature will extend days required for fermenting your wine or stop the process prematurely leading to problem wine.
  11. Tomato Wine This recipe makes a 1 gallon batch, If a larger batch is desired, all ingredients will scale proportionately. ***Note that 1 pack of yeast would be enough for 6 gallons. Ingredients 3.5 lbs. Tomatoes 96 oz. water 1 cup Raisins 1.5 lbs. sugar 2.5 tsp. Acid Blend [ juice half a lemon] 0.25 tsp. Tannin [1x tea bag] 1 tsp. Yeast Nutrient 1 pack Lalvin EC-1118 wine yeast Stage 1: Preparation Wash tomatoes and remove any portions that are bruised. Cut into pieces. Place into nylon straining bag. Press, crush and strain juice into primary fermenter. Keeping all pulp in straining bag, tie top and place in primary. Stir in all other ingredients except yeast, cover and wait 24 hours. Yeast Hydration and primary fermentation: in a large cup add 4 ounces of warm chlorine free water. This water is to not exceed 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir contents of yeast packet into warm water and be sure to break up any clumps. Let mixture stand in cup for 15 minutes. Bubbling or increase in mixture size is a good sign of rehydration. Add an equal part of juice to the hydrated yeast mixture and let stand for 15 minutes. Pour yeast mixture into bucket and stir gently. Next, measure and record the Specific Gravity and temperature to establish a fermentation starting point. Recording your S.G. and temperature in a log will be helpful especially if you would like to duplicate your results next season. ***Place primary fermenter with lid lightly on (can use a cheese cloth or clean hair net over bucket) and in a location, that is 65-75 Degrees Fahrenheit. Consistent stirring: Stir gently twice daily for 5 minutes. Stir once in the morning and once in the evening. Continue to monitor the yeast activity (bubbling, foaming, etc.) that is most active in this stage. Readings of S.G. decrease as sugar converts to alcohol. Stage 2: Secondary Fermentation Once the vigorous fermentation has subsided, rack to the secondary fermentation vessel, a one gallon carboy or jug, gently press the fruit to extract remaining wine, and fit the airlock with bung in the opening. Although yeast activity will decrease as the fermentation process proceeds, the process will continue on in this phase. S.G. Monitoring: Check S.G.: if 0.990-0.996 the wine will be dry, if 1.000 it will be medium- sweet, if greater than 1.000 it will be a sweet wine. Allow fermentation to continue longer if needed for desired dryness. You should taste the wine to find the dryness or sweetness level that is desired. When the wine is ready, proceed to stabilization. Remember temperature controls the rate of fermentation, cool temperature will extend days required for fermenting your wine or stop the process prematurely leading to problem wine.
  12. Your red grape carton juice wine recipe sounds good and i am sure it will turn out great. Pomegranite wine should turn out a red colored wine and maybe a bit tart if dry,so you might have to back sweeten it.
  13. The Thai's registered with Maharat hospital directly from the f.b page which is in Thai.
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