Connect with us

Crime

Panel says Boss Voovidhya arrest warrant still stands

Jack Burton

Published 

 on 

Panel says Boss Voovidhya arrest warrant still stands | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Nation Thailand
  • follow us in feedly

The arrest warrant for Red Bull scion Vorayuth “Boss” Yoovidhya remains in place, despite a request from police that it be withdrawn, according to the head of the independent panel examining the 2012 hit-and-run case. Vicha Mahakun, who chairs the panel, was speaking yesterday after a second meeting of the panel, ordered by PM Prayut Chan-o-cha amid public outrage over public prosecutors’ decision not to indict Vorayuth.

The panel learned from the chief judge of Southern Bangkok Criminal Court that police had requested the warrant be cancelled but the move was opposed by a group led by former Bangkok senator Rosana Tositrakul, who petitioned the court against the police request.

The court therefore asked police to withdraw their request, which they eventually did, according to Vicha, who added that especially since the Office of the Attorney General has announced new evidence in the case and that a fresh probe is likely to be ordered, “the warrant should not be revoked.”

Vicha says his panel is due to question the Attorney General’s team.

The deputy chief of Bangkok’s Thong Lor police station says investigators will question new witnesses as soon as they receive an order from the OAG. He was responding to the OAG’s findings about a formal inspection of the speed of Vorayuth’s Ferrari when it crashed into the rear of the motorcycle of 47 year old police officer Wichian Klanprasert, killing him, on September 3, 2012. It also referred to a medical exam on the suspect that found narcotics, including cocaine, in his bloodstream.

A member of the panel said Tuesday the new evidence involves statements by 2 experts about the Ferrari’s speed at the time of the fatal crash. Prayuth Petchkhun, who is also a deputy spokesman for the OAG, told the House committee on Law, Justice and Human Rights yesterday that a new piece of evidence found by the OAG’s panel showed Vorayuth’s Ferrari was going as fast as 177 kmh.

The report was prepared by a physics lecturer at Chulalongkorn University’s Faculty of Science. The discovery of narcotics in Vorayuth’s body also justifies additional charges against the suspect and a new probe into the substances, according to Prayuth.

Panel says Boss Voovidhya arrest warrant still stands | News by The Thaiger

PHOTO: SCMP

SOURCES: Chiang Rai Times | Bangkok Post

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.



Read more headlines, reports & breaking news in Bangkok. Or catch up on your Thailand news.

Jack Burton is an American writer, broadcaster, linguist and journalist who has lived in Asia since 1987. A native of the state of Georgia, he attended the The University of Georgia's Henry Grady School of Journalism, which hands out journalism's prestigious Peabody Awards. His works have appeared in The China Post, The South China Morning Post, The International Herald Tribune and many magazines throughout Asia and the world. He is fluent in Mandarin and has appeared on television and radio for decades in Taiwan, Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Toby Andrews

    August 6, 2020 at 2:13 pm

    So is the arrest warrant for Lord Lucan, which has as much chance of resulting in anyone going to court.

  2. Avatar

    Joseph McKee

    August 14, 2020 at 6:35 pm

    Famous and wealthy people can become “intoxicated” by the power and prestige that come with their celebrity status and consider themselves above the law as they are part of an industry where it is a norm for scandals to occur. They believe that playing with the law is their right and they can get away with it. Celebrities and powerful people need to realize that power and fame do not excuse them from following the law or societal standards.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Protests

Protest leaders face charges for violating Thailand’s lèse majesté law and for installing the plaque

Caitlin Ashworth

Published

on

Protest leaders face charges for violating Thailand’s lèse majesté law and for installing the plaque | The Thaiger
FILE PHOTO

Leaders of the weekend’s pro-democracy protest in Bangkok are facing charges for violating Thailand’s lèse majesté laws and installing a symbolic plaque at a “registered historical site”. Police filed complaints against 10 to possibly more than 16 protesters.

It’s unclear how many protesters will be charged, but the Royal Thai Police spokesperson Piya Uthayo says charges will be pressed against those who “pulled the strings.” He says the Chanasongkhram Police have received several lèse majesté complaints. Under the lèse majesté law, it is illegal to insult or defame the Thai Monarch or royal family. Piya says police will take the strongest legal actions possible against those who undermined the Monarchy.

A lèse majesté complaint was filed by a leader of the pro-government “multi-coloured shirts movement” Tul Sittisomwong who said the protesters had “once again crossed the line,” according to the Bangkok Post.

“I don’t mind if they talked about politics, the prime minister or the constitution because they have the right to do so, but not about the monarchy.”

The Bangkok Post reports that around 10 protesters will be charged with violating the Public Assembly Act and Criminal Code while 4 people will be charged with violating the lèse majesté law. Thai PBS estimates at least 16 people face charges for violating the lèse majesté law and installing the plaque.

Protesters installed a plaque on the forecourt of the royal parade grounds, aka. Sanam Luang, next to the Grand Palac. The pro-democracy plaque symbolically renamed the area Sanam Ratsadon, or “People’s Ground”. The plaque disappeared and the spot was covered with concrete less than 24 hours after being embedded by the protesters early on Sunday morning. Police say they removed the plaque because it would be used as evidence against protest leaders.

The Fine Arts Department and the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration filed complaints with police over the installation of the plaque, saying the protesters broke the law by causing damage to an archaeological site. The department says the plaque installation violates the Ancient Monuments, Antiques, Objects of Art and National Museums Act, as Sanam Luang is a historical site protected by law. The removal of another historic plaque in 2017, commemorating the Siam Revolution in 1932, when Thailand’s absolute monarchy was overthrown by a constitutional monarchy, was not reported by the same organisations.

Authorities also claim rally leaders broke into Thammasat University’s Tha Prachan campus and entered the grounds of Sanam Luang without permission. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration also asked police to take action against protesters who destroyed barriers and fences at the university as well as the damage done when installing the plaque at Sanam Luang, according to Metropolitan Police Bureau deputy spokesperson (the concrete has already been replaced after being torn out of the cement sometime on the early hours of Monday morning).

“The protesters damaged BMA properties and violated the Act on the Maintenance of the Cleanliness and Orderliness of the Country.”

SOURCES: Thai PBS | Bangkok Post

Catch up with the latest daily “Thailand News Today” here on The Thaiger.

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Crime

Police officer allegedly shot and killed a woman at a Bangkok temple

Caitlin Ashworth

Published

on

Police officer allegedly shot and killed a woman at a Bangkok temple | The Thaiger
PHOTO: Thairath

A police officer allegedly shot and killed a woman making merit at a Bangkok temple yesterday. The 35 year old police officer, Siriwan Sumredsilpa, turned herself in to police. Siriwan allegedly approached the 39 year old woman from behind and shot her 4 times in the head. She was making merit that morning at the Nimmanoradee Temple in Bangkok around 7am yesterday morning.

The victim, Linlada Phattanphan, went to the temple that morning with her maid and roommate, 52 year old Maneerat Srithornrat. As the 2 of them were about to head home, a woman – around 35 to 40 years old – came up behind Linlada and shot her multiple times at a close range, the maid told police.

Surveillance camera footage shows the shooter wearing a cap and face mask. The video shows the shooter getting out of a vehicle parked in a black SUV next to the victim’s car right when Linlada was about to drive home. The alleged shooter then then fled the scene.

Police say the shooter grabbed Linlada’s hands and neck before firing the gun. When officers from the Phasi Charoen Police Station arrived at the scene, they found Linlada on the ground laying next to her car in a pool of blood. A forensic team from the Siriraj Hospital responded to the scene and said the woman was shot with 9mm bullets.

Siriwan went to the Sriprachan Police Station in Suphanburi province later that afternoon and allegedly confessed to the shooting. Police say she shot Linlada due to a personal dispute. The Phasi Charoen Police Station is still investigating.

SOURCE: Pattaya News

Catch up with the latest daily “Thailand News Today” here on The Thaiger.

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading

Protests

5 protesters to be charged over a rally in front of the Thai Army’s headquarters

The Thaiger

Published

on

5 protesters to be charged over a rally in front of the Thai Army’s headquarters | The Thaiger

With impeccable timing, Nang Loeng police have summoned 5 protest leaders to appear before the Special Prosecutor’s Office at the Dusit District Court in Bangkok. They will be formally charged over their roles in a protest in front of the Army’s headquarters on July 20. At the time it followed an online exchange from an Army official criticising the students who had been protesting at the Democracy Monument days before.

The protest targeted Colonel Nusra Vorapatratorn, deputy spokesperson of the Army. Posting on her Facebook page about the Saturday protest, the Colonel said that rally’s participants should “focus on doing their jobs rather than joining the protest.” The Colonel later deleted the social media post.

Another army spokesman, Colonel Winthai Suvaree, spoke to the media at the time and stated that Nusra “had expressed her personal opinion” and that “she is no longer the deputy spokesperson”.

After protesting outside the Army over the contents of the post, 5 protest leaders face official charges of “violating the Emergency Decree, the Traffic Act and use of loudspeakers in public without permission. The 5 protagonists facing charges are human rights lawyer Anon Nampa, Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak, Piyarath “Toto” Jongthep, Suwanna Tarnlek and Panupong Jardnok (Mike Rayong).

All 5 deny the charges and say they will defend their roles in court.

The charges follow a weekend of protests, with up to some 30,000 people gathering in the Bangkok rain to rally against the government and confirm a 10-point manifesto which includes demands to reform Thai politics and the country’s monarchy. Specially the demands include the dissolution of the Thai parliament, standing down of the current PM and a new constitution to replace the 2017 Thai charter.

Today the Fine Arts Department has also says it will file charges of “trespassing on an archaeological site” after protesters yesterday embedded a symbolic brass plaque to replace another plaque that dates back to the 1932 Siam Revolution (when a bloodless coup overthrew the ‘absolute monarchy’ in Thailand). That plaque mysteriously disappeared in 2017.

The protesters responded this afternoon by saying that Sanam Luang is not an archaeological site, but a “public space for recreation and for vendors and hawkers”.

Following on from the support of the crowd over the weekend, the protesters are planning to stage another protest in front of Parliament this Thursday. A House debate on constitutional amendments is due to start this Wednesday.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World

Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page.
Never miss out on future posts by following The Thaiger.
Continue Reading
Follow The Thaiger by email:

Trending